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0

I imagine this would be an important thing to do in order to read the page, especially if the page is initially rendered in a language you do not understand (assuming it did not auto detect), so this should be in a prominent position at the top of the page. Typically you see this in the top right corner for websites (because corners are very prominent ...


0

I think there's a bit of context lost in your captures, but strictly basing on them, the answer is easy: in the old version, the byline could either belong to the photo above or what appears to be an ad, so it's totally out of place. Also, those giant social media buttons on top of an ad are really confusing, they're grabbing attention to something else on ...


0

I suggest it will be a multi selection drop down on the top of the settings, titled with ( please select items to apply settings to ) or something like that . but it also depends on how many items in average you will select . and does the settings change based on selected items or not


-1

Fixed headers are a very bad design choice from user experience point of view no matter what research says. 1% of the time they are useful when a user needs to navigate somewhere and 99% of the time they just sit there providing no utility to the user. Fixed headers are allowed only when they automatically hide when scrolling down and show up whenever the ...


1

You could take a page out of desktop ergonomics and go for a split keyboard. It looks like iOS has beat you to this concept for touch screens, at least for the iPad. If you're lucky though, they won't sue you. If you're very lucky, they haven't even patented it.


0

You may want to provide some more context, but a simple popup menu sounds like a good idea.


0

Have you tried shifting the values based on the number of digits? In other words, set the vertical offset for the single-digit numbers to remove the empty space and then move the numbers upwards as the number of digits increases. The plus side of this approach is that now, in addition to the visual- length-based sorting already present, height-based ...


12

One option you may try is to make the dark area variable, depending from the number of digits. This way the dark area will also work as a visual cue, indicating the magnitude of the number.


2

Scaling of text according to the size of the sample, on comparable images, more often than not results badly. Lets try to work around that. Small numbers (as in single digit numbers) might look too isolated and unaesthetic when appearing on a bigger canvas. This can be avoided to an extent by making the ten's place hold a value by default (0 in our ...


20

Are you restricted to using an angled corner? If not, a box would be much more simple & sleek. Otherwise if you are stuck using the angled corner, aligning to the top right rather then center is probably your best bet!


0

The folder/subfolder structure is very intuitive, because people work already like that in their file browser, and it maps also very well to the concrete worlds of paper files. Showing the file only once seems however a terrible loss of information that might mislead the user: he might want to discard a document because he thinks it's not used ...


0

As your question highlights, we can't always live in a perfect world. Sometimes there are just a lot of points in the navigation. I've had to deal with this in both consumer and enterprise contexts, and I'm happy to say I've found a simple solution that works. For the main nav, stick with the well-proven horizontal top bar or tabs. For the subsections, use ...


1

To quickly answer your question, I think this is an Occam's Razor scenario, where the correct solution is usually the simplest one. Instead of creating complicated usability layouts and absolute positioning, simply provide a position relative to a known point in space, like the front door, checkout counters, whatever. See mockup below: This way, just a ...


1

I think some of the confusion may arise out of the fact that, as it is currently designed, each "shelf" is represented as a single unit. In the view above, the entire "shelf" is active, though one side is actually inaccessible to the user in their current location. Perhaps if you somehow divided each shelf into two parts, and only showed the part facing the ...



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