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One way I'm thinking is using the link icon along with a title: Linked to XYZ, and when user clicks/hovers on it; show more details of the linking in a popup, callout, or new page.


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In an answer to a recent question I suggested gradual engagement. Same answer applies here. Each request to the user for info should ask only for the info that's necessary at the time, and makes clear why it's necessary. That is, registering for a site might only ask for an email address and password. Ask for the user's mailing address only when they're ...


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Company wants to sell something and customer want to buy something, but the real factor is none of the users don't like to fill webforms especially the long ones. So you must careful when you are presenting a long form in front of a user. Few factors which will help you to build conversion forms. 3 Principles : 1. Make the from short and sweet, 2. Provide ...


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The usual method (at least on the Internet, so I'll assume your "product" is a web page) is to divide the form into smaller sections. If the user is trying to buy something, make a first page asking for the payment info, then a second asking for the delivery adress, etc. Try to keep the user informed on the number of steps required though (even if there's ...


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I understand the point of the client. They want the title and hero image to be together, to grab maximum attention. However that'll look look badly formatted: By inserting a bit of text and the full width horizontal rule, you create some white space and a bit more visual balance. The horizontal rule indicates the width of the content, which is a bit wider ...


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Your question has an answer in another UX question, Your desktop application, if it is built on system controls (not with it's own graphic style entirely) should use system font to be compliant to OS guidelines (weither it is Windows, Mac OS or Unix derivative OS) It is important to know what it is built for. If it uses a system controls to primarily ...


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It's always best practice to go with system fonts cos some environment/company's has restrictions on custom font download. OR Please go with what your design is demanding


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You have got two options to tackle the problem at hand. Either stick with a font that works best for the interface, or start with the system font, and let the users select the font they most appreciate from a list of available fonts (from the preferences tab, which takes this into a whole other domain, I'll let you do your own research). This way, those who ...


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Unless your app has a clear character or you have a brand font (Spotify for example), using the system font will make you fit in the system better. It's best to make layouts independent of font size, because those layouts will break for every change in text too.


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If you are bothered by the empty space you can also put the radio button on top of the description. You don't have to fill all empty space though, it all depends on the design and the rest of the panels. I like the idea of a description box, but would that be consistent with the rest of the settings panel?


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To me the main function of your form is to create or update a contact. So I'd suggest renaming it to: Create / update a contact. Then move the drop-down with existing contacts and the button to create a new contact to the top, side-by-side: [ existing contacts drop-down ] [ + new contact ] This makes the purpose of the modal much clearer. Don't show the ...


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A few points: 1) Make sure there is a default state so that if a user type is not manually selected it doesn't trigger a fault with the back-end, is saved into a findable default place/category/type, and the info is not lost completely. 2) What is the most vital information to capture? As this is titled "Add a contact" I suspect it's the user type and user ...



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