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Let's start with why.... Your content is center-aligned today. So as users navigate down the page, they expect the next piece of content to be center-aligned. Today you have a big green, center-aligned button. It's not getting noticed enough. Why isn't it being noticed? Hard to tell exactly without looking at the exact content, but it's likely that: The ...


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According to Fitt's law: the time required to rapidly move to a target area is a function of the ratio between the distance to the target and the width of the target. You can also consider the Gutenberg's Diagram, but according to research study by Nielsen, this terminal zone concept isn't really that useful, although in my personal experience it works ...


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Best practice You'll find a lot of info out there about CTA tests and theories. But you're not going to find a whole lot that tells you what to do with horizontal alignment. The reason is, it depends on your design. The norm If your colleagues want to talk about what is more common, then you should align right, as you suggest. This is used more often than ...


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What will the CTA be doing? Depending on what pressing the button will do will likely lead to a different placement. Such as, if it's leading to another page it can be meaningful to place on the right for a desktop design as most desktop OSs use next/ok buttons on the bottom right. One could argue a neutral centre position can work in most cases.


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I think you should design both, why not? I think a navigation that works without burger menu is better for visibility, but sometimes it's unavoidable on mobile platforms.


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Flyout elements can be distracting. If it has to happen you can consider just sliding it out from bottom to top but make sure it doesn't cover the sharing options. While the real estate is limited, one alternative is to also have a sticky section on mobile (it'll be consistent with web experience). Perhaps at the bottom of the page.


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Of course there are plenty of arguments for and against both sides. I would put it this way though. "Do you believe that negative-positive placement is the best? No or Yes?" The point being that "Yes or No" flows better when spoken, which likely explains why positive-negative button order was chosen by Microsoft. On the OTHER hand, negative-positive flow ...


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Your two suggested solutions represent two very different types of interfaces. The list approach uses a "conversation" metaphor, where the user indirectly "talks" to the application, while the second approach uses a "model-world" metaphor, where the user can directly interact with domain objects (in your case "cards" and "decks"). Using a model-world ...


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I'd recommend to go with boxes first, probably your amount of "decks" will increase with time, so you could actually add the feature to select both views in a future upgrade. Boxes fits perfect for little amounts of items, but eventually a user will find more useful to select from a list. I also noticed the boxes have a star, is that a "favorite star" to ...



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