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From a design standpoint, however, drop-down menus are an excellent feature because they help clean up a busy layout. If structured correctly, drop-down menus can be a great navigation tool, while still being a usable and attractive design feature. drop-down navigation menus can be user-friendly. Recently Jacob Nielsen the results of his recent drop-down ...


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In 99% of the cases you don't need to keep multiple parent items expanded at once. Moreover, it is advisable not to do so, as you don't want the user to get confused about her current location on your website and eventually get lost. And yes, there are scenarios in which you would want to have all the items expanding without collapsing their siblings. Such ...


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"It doesn’t matter how good your website is if users can’t find their way around it." - By jerrycao Continuing with my answer posted just a day before. I stated that collapse menu's are better, and also gave some valid reasons. Note: Please read my previous answer(linked above), come back and continue here. Now talking about your case, I would ...


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Provide them shortcuts for expand/collapse all, then let them organize it from there (unless there's some explicit reason for them not to be able to expand multiple siblings concurrently).


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I've found that letting users choose when tabs open and closed is best, so I would leave it up to the user to collapse one menu, even when following a link in another menu. A scenario describing why would include users who might be navigating through different parts of the site multiple times. If I want to go to the pratius page, then artius, them to ...


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I find the top view better, but the bottom one is sometimes used by users with multiple monitors. Why not re-designing into a panels layout (like Visual Studio) so the user can decide which one suits him better? At the end everyone has a different preference...


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I think one of the toughest things to parse here is the typography. All that extra tracking plus all-caps is making this look like a jumble of individual characters, instead of recognizable words.


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Another **possible fix ** could be just swap the position of the form in the second case (where few addresses are already there). And make the entire address chunk/div clickable with different prominent states (hover, selected). Also you can change the visual style of showing it as possible options(in this case the position of the radio button). In the ...


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The design as you show it assumes people want to add multiple shipping addresses and then choose one for the current order. I think this is not the typical use case. Adding a new shipping address is needed only if it is not yet in the list of existing addresses: Either this is the first shipment, or the current order should go somewhere else. Having this ...


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You can ask the user to name the address by something at the end of the check out. So that for the next purchase, s/he can directly select the address from a drop down. In case of new address a specific and prominent button will be present with "Add New" label.


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In addition to the "it depends on the app" answer, i'll throw in this: "It depends on the user's preference". Therefore, if you want to really impress users, allow the option to do all 3. But of course this means more work. Also, you should consider if the side menu is something that you'd expect users to keep open more often than not. If so, then perhaps ...


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It depends on your application. Will you be using any information on the table when doing something on the sidebar? If so, I would go with Method A (with or without transparency). It also seems to be best practices for a few style guides (check Google's Material Design for Navigation drawer at https://material.google.com/patterns/navigation-drawer.html#...


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Adding things just to fill in space can lead to an increase in the user's cognitive workload, thereby making it harder for them to recognize what they're looking for, absorb information, or take an action. With that in mind, I would recommend you group your radio buttons closer and left align the title with the description box, like the example below.


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When elements are crammed together like tiles in a mosaic instead of overlapping like Windows 95, it's called a Tiling Window. You might also see it called Non-blocking UI, or Non-overlapping UI, or Non-Modal Interface or Non-overlapping User Interface. Tiling windows also tend to be in a tight relationship with the non-blocking philosophy which is ...



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