Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Great question! This is a very common design pattern and it's one that sites screw up all the time (IMO!). Usually the objective is: Ensure the user sees the notification. Allow the user to get on with using the site smoothly after that. Don't p*ss off your users. This seems simple, but implementations often break the objectives! For example: Model ...


0

You could show both simple message and full message in one table view along with a filter button. On tap of filter button user could tick simple or full message then the tableview will be reloaded with only the selected message type. So this way you could provide user to see both message at once and separately as per users usage. Hope I got your query ...


0

I think a very similar challenge has linkedin when you are editing your profile. It gives you some visual representation of how much you have completed in your profile. To motivate you for more input, it constantly puts a prominent text box at the top of the screen, one by one, to ask for more input. For your case it does not perfectly fit due to the lack ...


1

The user story here would be: As a user, I'd like to easily locate to the next field where my action is required. Now there are many ways to satisfy this, but also quite a few assumptions being made. Visual inspection anyone? One of them, is simply by visual inspection. If you know a bit about visual cognition, you can design the interface in such ...


2

It is likely to give the content more height to work with. The various ui elements at the top and bottom of the screen, menu, address bar, favourite, other toolbar, footer, start-bar/dock and you end up with a very letter boxed view of the content. Particularly as websites depend on scrolling and don't have control of these other desktop level ui ...


1

I'm quite sure that there is no "optimal" card size, because as you say, it depends on the content and a lot of factors. For example, cards containing newspaper headlines will obtain better results with different aspect ratios than cards containing photographic thumbanails (e.g. pinterest). And for sites where user attention is directed towards a focused ...


0

To me it seems like there are two clear options: [ the ] bulk of the [ form ] [dropdown dropdown dropdown dropdown][submitbtn] or [ the [dropdown] bulk ...


5

If you want a logical way to display it, I'll go trough that And by the way, care about typo size if you go responsive, that's quite low here.


0

In relation to your question, I think that the solution two its more right than first solution (maybe the buttons All and None, like landonz said, would be better delete it if it not are necessary or found other solution for that buttons) but it have keep in mind the colors of buttons. There are accessibility guides for use colours in web applications (W3C) ...


1

This is a pattern that is frequently used on sites with a lot of articles (e.g. news sites). So it is "acceptable" in the sense that there are successful sites which use this pattern, and which do not allow users control over layout. The reason it is used: It breaks the monotony (or worse: disorientation) of a strict grid layout where cells are all the ...


0

In my humble opinion as the comments go my first reaction to this winform is that this something of the past and I should get out of here as soon as possible. It's nearly scary! BUT if the app is targeting a forum of guys who are madly in love with the windows xp(erience) then knock yourself out! That being said let's move to your specific issue. You ...


1

Your best bet is to start collecting data. If you can observe actual users, great. If not, simulate this using hallway testing. Go to somebody in your office with a single monitor. See how they perform the task. Now try the same with people with multiple monitor setup. Do you see any difference in their workflow? How different is single vs dual monitors? ...


0

One place I have seen vertical text used more prominently is the hotel sign. I think the justification here is obviously to have the sign stick close to the building and not obstruct the street and also a clear and quick reading for the oncoming travelers (without having to tilt your head while driving :-) ). I also think the length of the words, number of ...


0

Text has a strong top-to-bottom flow. If text is shown rotated 90 degrees counter-clockwise, that flow will move left to right with regard to the surrounding material. If text is rotated ninety degrees clockwise, the flow will be right to left. Text which is shown as a stack of upright letters will have a top-down flow, but will be harder to read, ...


1

I think what you're looking for is a "definition list" or <dl>. Those are for just this kind of scenario where you have a series of heading / text pairs. The attributes like "color" and "size" would be <dt> and the "blue" and "XL" would be <dd>.


1

@JonW the content you want to display fits exactly with the structure of table content - headers on the left, and content on the right, so yes, it is appropriate to use a table to display this information. To illustrate the point, try using vanilla html with this content and you'll see that the pattern which most closely matches your content is a table. ...


0

Top left on mobile phones is awful. For some reason, it is a standard now in iOS and Android (phones without physical "back"). Though it makes it very awkward to use with one hand. Assuming you use right hand, in order to reach the top left corner with your thumb is a pain, especially on 5+ inch phones. The only logical place for the "back" button is bottom ...


1

@JonW, please refer to the official HTML5 Specification. My personal opinion, and one that many have is that if it looks like a spreadsheet, then it belongs in a table. The HTML5 table page says this: Contexts in which this element can be used: Where flow content is expected. Precise rules for determining whether this conformance requirement is met ...


2

You shouldn't need to rely on something as rigid as a table to have consistency in a UI. How to present non-tabular content (which I agree this is) is a design problem, and can be solved with layout positioning, typography, background colors, and fixed-width elements. I think the Amazon example doesn't feel consistent because the heights of the sections ...


1

From a ux perspective there isn't a reason to avoid a tabular layout if it's appropriate. If you're concerned about it from a semantic web perspective then use divs to achieve your layout. EDIT: I, as have many people, have come to expect tabular data. It's quick and easy to scan information. For a clothing website that may not have every size and color for ...


0

Displaying just 1 will make the other lose a good part of its meaning. For example, unless the review is very detailed, **what would be your impression of a product with 1 start (or 5) if t has just 1 review vs one that has 500 reviews?* It's a very different situation! If you don't display the numbers of reviews too, you could be creating a possible false ...


5

It's not a lot of information. Amazon already do something similar. It's quite informative.


1

No one mentioned localization so far. UI Design guidelines recommend leaving enough space for longer wordings potentially coming with other languages. Vertical radio buttons have as much space as width of the section. But with 3 horizontal buttons you are limiting yourself to less than 1/3 of the width (3 radio buttons and 3 labels in one row) and it might ...


0

I think sequential form would be the effective solution for this problem. - It will force user to go through each step to complete process. - No mandatory steps would be missed. (Its problem in tab that we cant see under which tab we have mandatory fields so we have to go through each and every tab) - It reduces users cognitive load by dividing/splitting ...


1

The horizontal layout is much less readable. In my opition, this case is the only exception: (x) yes ( ) no (not to mention lay outs used in A/B tests, where two images are displayed horizontally with a radio button underneath each one) Even if the labels are "left/center/right", I don't see components being used that way. If we want to mimic something, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included