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0

I would not consider this being a user preference where you need to go back to a default state. I think it's more of a contextual thing where you set the fields to the proper type so that the corresponding keyboard shows up. For email, you'd set the type to "email" and the associated keyboard would automatically be used (it would contain the ., the .com, the ...


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Firstly, I commend you for getting some genuine testing done on your design. Many products don't allow themselves this and suffer with a poor performing site as a result. However: ...Several users found the contact form section very big and loud and wanted me to get rid of the background I was using on it. After thinking about this for a while and ...


-3

Its actually very good idea to ask user friendly questions rather than just simple label. This will surely work, as long as you split it in two sections one with the form & other with the contact information. You can label the form with 'Let us contact you' or 'Let us know you' When it comes to background, its way too loud. But its not just the contact ...


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That is quite a loud background, but I think there's a problem with the contact form as well. I don't think it's impossible to open with a contact form, but it doesn't work here. I'd pinpont the following (potential) flaws: The site doesn't follow social norms. You don't ask questions before telling people something about yourself, and why they should ...


1

I also design many sorting, filtering, enlisting interactions for work. I believe that if your system / code / technicalities can handle it, instant filtering is the best option for lists that are not very very long. It is essential to see the criteria and fiddle with them at all times. Having a Filterind menu on the left usually is the best solution I went ...


0

It seems that your filter fields are unnecessarily wide. If you make them much smaller in width, you can easily fit the three inputs into one row (though you might need to move the label to be above each field), and you will save a large amount of space. If you look at modern dashboard designs, you will see this is usually how they are done. See here as one ...


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Yes, as you suspect, the problem is with the "similar" (as opposed to "the same"). If you repeat part of the UI on different pages, from the users point of view it just stays in place; it is not "seen again, somewhere else". That obviously creates a strong expectation of perfect consistency. Because of that, even minor changes of the repeated part of the UI ...


0

I think it depends upon the question you are framing around these options. From your options I believe it is framed around some security related questions. General users tendency is to look for relevant options by reading them all and chose the most suited to them. I recommend "Doesn't matter" should be placed in the last of the queue.


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"Doesn't Matter" style questions and "Not Applicable" answers require a different science. It's important to understand that "Doesn't Matter" or "Not Applicable" used the wrong way could lead to an inability to collect data accurately. I actually created a video topic about this on YouTube if you wish to take a look and review: ...


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I would definately split the question. What I perceive the security to be, does not necesarrily have anything to do with whether or not it matters to me (I might say that the security is really bad but that does not matter to me because I don't use cloud services). Furthermore, quite often you only label the end-point of such a scale thereby making the data ...


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I would say Very Secure | Secure | Insecure | Very Insecure ||| Doesn't Matter e.g. separate it visually from the rest of the options.


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I agree with @Jayfang's comment, what does "Doesn't Matter" mean? I think your dilemma is that Doesn't Matter could represent both the middle ground, or just that the user doesn't know. Split them out like this: Very Secure | Secure | Average | Insecure | Very Insecure | No Opinion


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I think visually distinctive on the right would make the most sense. To me, it's an alternative to the other answers on the question. I wouldn't recommend placing it in the middle, because if someone doesn't have an opinion about something, you shouldn't count it as neutral (because neutral is an actual opinion).


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For me personally "It doesn't matter" means that I don't have a strong opinion towards Very much or Not at all. So in your case I would go for the middle, representing indifference.


0

You have a problem in your hands, and although there could be many possible solutions, in my opinion, there is only one that would really work. Reorganize the information/questions so they can be fitted on A4 pages. We can not tell you how to redesign the form because we do not know the contents, but what we know is that the people who has to fill the form ...


4

Complexity is a relative term. It depends on the context of the user and the tasks they are trying to complete using your interface. For example, the instrument panel of a Cessna 182 will look very complex to a non-pilot: Similarly, the instrument panel of a Boeing 787 will look very complex to a private pilot that has only ever flown a 182: The ...


3

This is related to what is commonly know as the vertical-horizontal illusion. What happens is that the horizontal line segment appears to be shorter than the vertical line segment, despite being the same length. One interpretation of why this happen is that it's due the the asymmetry of our normal field of vision (it's larger horizontally than ...


3

This is not caused by the pixel sizes, as the pixels on screens are supposed to be spaced in a way that the distances between the center of pixels is the same in each axis, otherwise photos and movies would seem squashed or stretched to viewers. If you take a post it note and place it on your screen, you should see the same effect as you do if you adjust ...


1

Because pixels are not square. Most of them at least. Depending on a complex combination of source of the image, components of the projection system, dimension of the screen, standard adopted on that device and kind of image that you are watching the pixels may be square or not, more over square pixels may be converted to non-square and viceversa. The ...


2

This is purely a matter of visual cognition - if the visual design makes it easy to group related elements, there is no problem putting anything anywhere, including buttons on a tab space. So long users can interpret the tabs as tabs and buttons (or other elements) as such, there shouldn't be a problem. In the top example, the distinction is fairly clear - ...


3

1. Aspect Ratio It depends on your screen resolution's aspect ratio. You'd need to adjust it to see the square appropriately. Sometimes this stretches shapes in an awful way. I've had to fiddle with mine at work for a while before it was fixed (sort of... See Eyeballing below) 2. CRT Monitors In the unlikely event you are using a CRT monitor, this can ...


0

I have found that you get better usage when your filters are laid out in the same pattern as the fields on your form. Users seems to like have the User Name filter field in the same place as the User Name data entry field. This will not work as well when you have dozens of fields on your form. It can be much simpler to give the users a single field in ...


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You could do either, depending on how you want to present the information. Do you want to emphasize "normal" or are you trying to emphasize the "non-normal" condition? Users will tend to scan from left-to-right - placing the object you want emphasize to the left would make sense as a result. Because the "normal" condition is common across all tabs, you can ...


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Personally, I like to structure my form so that my fields are vertical. This leaves a clean area to the right to put validation messages, help icons, etc. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups That said, you can have either way. No way is better than the other. As long as you have the Six Components of Web Forms, ...


0

There's a Gestalt law of grouping saying that elements close to each other are perceived as belonging together: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principles_of_grouping#Proximity . I would even go as far and reckon that it was this perception that made you ask this question in the first place... ;-) Thus in your example, "First Name" and "Username", and "Last ...



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