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There is some evidence that suggests labels above their relevant inputs is preferable to labels on the left of the inputs (http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2006/07/label-placement-in-forms.php) You should also add more space between the fields to make them easier to recognize as individual units. It looks like you may have some grouped fields there so ...


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In order to make the controls more usable I recommend having as few free entry fields as possible. Go for combo boxes, date/hour pickers, prefill the values where possible, offer partially filled templates and so on. This makes data entry take less time and decreases the mental load by using recognition over recall. As for the layout, you can spatially ...


0

Why not simply use an intuitive tri-state check-box column (if it's available)? It saves space, and properly represents your data (if/when users are familiar with such controls).


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Multiple interconnecting popups is in itself not a very delightful experience, since it causes confusion. For example, can I as a user step back to the previous popup when the next popup appears if I believe that my action on the first popup was incorrect? What happens if I accept the terms stated in the first popup, but cancel in the second, is the action ...


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To answer your question, the frequency of this action should be considered. Low frequency: Users do not remember their options when they don't use them regularly and so the options should be easily findable and understandable. Considering the screen real estate you have mentioned, and for users to easily understand their options, I would also suggest a ...


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You can use three radiobuttons with their backgroundcolor colored with Red = Out, Yellow = Undecided and Green = In (this because you mentioned a busy (tied) grid) and use a legend explaining the color meaning.


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Design for the micro-workflow Observations Most users will make a selection and move on, as you noted. Users are not very likely to deselect a choice, either immediately or afterwards. In and Out are the primary choices here. The undecided choice is an unbiased default. Null/default/undecided/unknown choices are often very difficult to design ...


1

Between your two mentioned options, the two toggle button option will be a good method. Advantages: clear affordances doesn't distract from the main content existing examples: upvote / downvote buttons across various sites like this (stackexchange), reddit, quora etc. [ p.s. since the elements would be inside a busy grid, implementing a design with ...


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This is one that should be tested because I have no idea if it will work. I wanted to come up with something that uses common elements and shows all options in a compact way. The idea is to leave out the "undecided" label by using two checkboxes. Why checkboxes? It should be common to people that if no option is wanted you just have to uncheck them. It's ...


3

There appears to be two issues at hand Explicit or Implicit Tri-state? Quite unanimously for reasons given explicit Tri-state is better Compact visualisation of explicit Tri-state Three buttons, radio button group, combo box all do the job. But another UI that helps communicate connectedness of concepts clearly is also the slider - or other similar ...


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Although some UI guides would suggest that check-boxes should only be used in cases where any combination of selections would be valid, I would suggest (and some designers seem to agree with me) that they are also appropriate in many cases where, given any combination of previous states and clicked state, it would be "obvious" what the desired next ...


2

Your solution is still a radio button. It's a radio button with three options: "in", "out" and "undecided"; of which "undecided" is the default. If you clearly show "undecided" as a third option, then there is no ambiguity to the user. There is no UX reason why you can't select one radio button option and then change it later, same as selecting toggle ...


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If you do not mind hiding the available options at first glance, you can also use a combo instead of radio buttons that could save you some column width. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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I would suggest a set of three radio buttons: one for 'in', one for 'out' and one for 'undecided'. Mutually exclusive toggles is likely to require lots of explanation and could leave the user confused: A pair of toggled buttons seems to offer 4 different combinations (A+/B+, A+/B-, A-/B+, A-/B-) but you are going to need to explain that there are only three ...


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First option is better, with the toggle. The reason why is because users given clear instruction on possible answers are more likely to understand and answer them (correctly) than when the instructions are obscured. In the case of the tri-switch, there are two visible options and one invisible option. Each has three states, but the latter has one option that ...


4

The natural arrangement for the relations between controls and their movements to the outcome from such action into the world in known as Natural Mapping. The above article, from Wikipedia, also using a stove top example; demonstrating poor mapping in control layout: and good mapping: Natural mapping provides users with properly organized controls for ...


0

The same depends on what your rest of the controls are, or in other words which hand you would be using the most while playing the game. If the game can be placed by just one hand, placing it on the right makes a lot of sense as most of the users are right handed. If the game needs to you use both your hand to control, the pause button should be placed ...


1

From the minimal amount of information I would say; roughly 90% of people are right handed, therefore will likely be using the phone with their right hand. If pausing is an important/prevalent part of the game put the button in the top right to be easier to reach. If you have more important elements or if the pause button is going to block important game ...


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It depends on how different those are and what is the business strategy for both features. To me, messaging and campaigns are two very different things. Messaging is a must-have feature for social service/social media, something with a conventional functionality that should meet users' expectations, whereas a campaign might very well be a killer feature ...


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Working on something similar, it may be more complicated than it seems to add multiple fieldsets with an auto-append way I would like to hear your opinions about the following issues: In the initial state should the user see that it is possible to add multiple fieldsets? The new line added should appear just when the user starts to type in the first field ...


1

You stress the importance of not having the search button at the top, but what if the bar and results still appeared from top-down upon pressing the button? Something like so:


0

I interpret your question to be the following - if that's wrong, forget this post :-( Why are all settings put into one single dialog, with a left side navigation, instead of providing a menu structure which allows to open (amodal) windows for different kinds of settings (e.g., viewing preferences vs. file locations, "diverse functional groups" in @tohster ...


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There are many reasons why UX designers make this choice A few observations: Settings are usually "out of flow" from the main app. For example, a music app's main flow is selecting and playing music. Settings like file locations, album artwork settings, and themes are not in the main workflow of the app. Settings are visited less frequently, which means ...


0

Wouldn't a radio button giving the 3 options ("Option A", "Option B", "Neither") be the most appropriate for the first group? I know they aren't as 'sexy' as buttons, but it seems to me that that's what you're trying to force a different achieve input type in to replicating. The other two are checkboxes. I'm sure there's some visual design requirements, ...


1

Is there a best practice for laying out buttons with different functionality? Let's get back to this in just a little. First, let's look at (emphasis added): I have four buttons on my interface that all look the same but don't all act the same. So you've asked a question about layout, but at the core the real issue you're trying to address is ...


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Checkboxes are often used instead... For these kinds of togglable, mutually exclusive options. For example: But if you prefer buttons... A check mark inside the buttons provides a better toggle affordance, and is also more color-blind friendly: Radio buttons can also be used here for the exclusive buttons, but they (a) require an additional 3rd ...


0

Unless the button texts are confusing, i would go with BDD's suggestion of having buttons 1&2 joined. if the button labels do. It suggest they can be cleared I would add text 'clear' somewhere near the button row, when a button has been selected. Not before. And text 'clear',not 'none' or fri-state buttons, those might be confusing.


4

A cyclical button may be your best choice. I have doubts about segmented controls since they traditionally match the mental model of radio buttons: one choice must always be selected. You could add a "None" option, but that could increase the clutter and confusion on the toolbar. A three-way toggle may fit your use case better. It isn't a very common ...


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For what I see, you actually have 3 buttons (= actions). Button 1 Tri state button/toggle: Button 1 reacts to itself and Button 2 Button 2 reacts to itself and Button 1 Button 2 Boolean button/toggle: Button 3 reacts to itself (YES/NO, ON/OFF) Button 3 Boolean button/toggle: Button 4 reacts to itself (YES/NO, ON/OFF) Basically, you have 3 actions, ...


1

You should try creating a grouped button control. Something like this: When a user looks at the grouped buttons he/she may not immediately understand which one is on and which one is off, so you should add some color (active = green). If you think that this is not enough and if your design permits add some depth in order to eliminate any doubt when it ...


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I would join button 1 and button 2. Then you can have the one that is selected be a different shade than the other (for example, 'yes' is selected in the example below. When 'no' is selected it will become blue and 'yes' will become white). This will show that those two are mutually exclusive. Then for buttons 3 & 4, I would use the same 'on' and ...


0

I would suggest an interaction like the following. On the left side there is a navigation on top level categories, which as you scroll down or click updates the section on the right.When a new item is added you can show an overlay popup for customization. On the right side you keep a summary of what is going so far, and what else the creator has to fill (I ...


0

How about showing one question at a time instead of all four together. This way the form won't feel difficult to use and you can keep the user focused. Especially for the second question since it look a bit more complicated. As the options are selected you can show the running total in a sidebar.


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I don't particularly like it. And the reason has to do with the visual separation of questions on a page. In short, the voting buttons are presently the most distinguishing feature identifying the top of a question and act as a very intuitive visual separator between questions. I found that when the voting buttons scrolled with the top of the window, I got ...


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I feel like it would increase the likelihood of me clicking the wrong voting buttons because I'd have 2 sets of voting buttons very close together when reading near the end of a comment -- those for the current comment and those for the next comment. Also, like others, I find the motion distracting.


0

Actually we also met such problem with too much data display in a table and user requires to see more columns directly instead of horizontal scrolling. What I know possible solution and what we also tried in our design: Try shrink the column width, like brief the wording or value. Brief view with expanding option, to allow user to view more details when ...


3

Print icons go in the top right of your screen. In eye tracking terms, this is a strong fallow area, and makes a good place for secondary actions like printing. This is a scenario where there is a strong conventional design pattern, and you probably shouldn't mess around with it. If printing is the primary action i.e. users most often get to the end of ...


1

It depends on your page design. The best position would be the point where user provides the last mandatory detail. That is the area where the print or call to action button must be placed. And hence it depends on the design or depth of the page. If its above the fold, you can provide immediately after the last input that is suppose to be filled by ...


2

I have never designed with something like a television in mind, so you bring up a great question. For instance, is there any kind of standardization among TV sets for displaying pixels? Even if it expands beyond 1920x1080 in pixels, does it display websites at that resolution or do handle things at 2x (or even 3x, 4x, etc.)? I would expect that even with ...


0

A good solution would be to scale your website depending on the resolution. I suggest creating a div for your site then adjust the width using percentage depending on the resolution. Consider using ranges. e.g. if viewport width < 1500, site width = 70% 1440x900 | body |----------| | | |----------| | | |---site---| | | ...


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You should think of each device you expect your website to be viewed on individually so you can make sure your site will be viewed properly.


0

Your question is relevant and what I feel is you should never consider a particular fixed width / resolution while designing because you will never know when and where your site will be accessed. So what I think is it is better to give 100% width so that it will display at least neatly (not very much perfectly) but it will be acceptable. Also if you want to ...


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It's a good idea, but it needs some implementation tweaking I think With a fixed voting console, it's easy to see how the console relates to the answer (it hangs off the top left so users know it relates to the answer) Once the panel becomes sticky while scrolling, it visually detaches from that anchor so it's important to maintain visual-semantic ...


3

Having control buttons in a fixed position is something quite common on today's web experience. You see the top navigation bar fixed at the top of a lot of news paper site and e-commerce sites. More annoying for some users (who don't use an AdBlock tool), is the fact that advertisement banners, usually on the right side of the page and not inline with ...


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Personally I think it's a good idea although currently ther doesn't look to be much distinction between a question and an answer, which means the user could confused as to what they are seeing on the left hand side, maybe it needs better labelling or hierarchy applied? Also in the case of a long answer versus a short answer, it doesn't hang around long on ...



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