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3

When designing any UI, consider that each element that you place on screen should have a clear purpose and function. That said, displaying 2 different search fields will result into confused users expecting those fields to perform different actions. It looks that your main CTA is search, so you your challenge seems very similar to the one Airbnb faces. ...


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Two search boxes in the home page will confuse users; they will wonder if there are two types of search. Also, by adding a second search you will make the design more complex. You should have as few elements as possible in your design. If you want to emphasize the search in the home page you can use white space just like Google does.


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(consider this more user feedback than UX professional feedback) The and and or filters are too complicated. Use and only. The user is smart enough to know that city and mountain and sea view will have few to no results. This simplifies the design (Look at View and Internet, my paint skills are limited): It works out very well with Internet since you can ...


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I suggest a grid so the user have the choice to focus on one phone at the time (vertically) or on the features (horizontally) download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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I think you're on the right track here. You could, however, make a combination of both solutions combining both strengths. Place the new entry button at the top of each list, next to the title. This way the button doesn't need a label (like Actions), the position makes sense and if you'd like you can keep both the title and the button fixed of the top of the ...


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The more you can lose design elements that doesn't provide value to the reader, the better. Vertical and horizontal lines, fat headers with disturbing colours or boxes without meaning. If you can work with negative space (a.k.a White Space) for clarity you make your news site easy on the eye and less stressful to brows through where content stand out ...


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I agree with DesignerAnalyst. Two search boxes will simply confuse the user and as such could be considered redundant as they result in the same goal. Google themselves have the search in the centre of the page, but once you begin to type, the search moves to the top left.


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I think I would choose the option on the right as it is more common and understandable. The option on the left doesn't look good at all for me. If the problem is the space, you can look for another design but putting the text vertically makes reading difficult.


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I'd say go for a sub domain. by doing this it'll clearly differentiate the different part of your website and will refocus users from viewing/getting inspired mode into shopping mode. have seen this practice across some commercial websites.


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Out of your two examples I would choose the right one. The one on the left looks like one group rather than 2. If space is a concern you could try implementing the group titles as tabs like in Adobe Photoshop (see screenshot). It is very clear what options relate to which group and the user can choose which arrangement of panels to construct which are ...


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There's a reason minimalist design has taken over the Internet... it's easier. The fewer available actions available to the user, the less confusion. Duplication of any action is completely unnecessary as long as the available actions are obvious and intuitive. You, out of anyone should know what the user is trying to achieve, it is your goal to present ...


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Without knowing what kind of a news site you are developing and without understanding what kind of an audience you want to draw/keep and making assumptions for the same, I would cautiously suggest a combination: - With Example 2, you are able to let the content be the star by taking away any visually distracting elements of the page. - With Example 3, you ...


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It depends on page to page. When you want a user to do one defined action you direct him with a call to action button. Giving too many might lead to the analysis paralysis or in most cases it makes all if them look equally important and thus leading to lesser conversions.


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I think the most compelling argument for these types of layouts is that they are used specifically for sites that want to tell a story. They are narrative in nature and progress naturally from top to bottom with scroll in easily digestible chunks with lots of space for large impacting visuals. Some of the examples in this article from Smashingmagazine.com ...


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As with "web gradients 2.0", "tickered text", overly animated sites or the paralax effect, it's trend. However, "divided content" also fundaments on that people don't care if they have scroll longer pages, as long as they get to the part they want to read. Less clicking and carefully selected text in each "divided content" means that you're less likely to ...


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Another personal opinion: Think of it as a (perhaps animated) multimedia magazine experience Colors, fluid/animated and fullscreen / big elements is just the thing for the moment Fullscreen adds some air/spaciousness to the viewing experience Colors make each page/section stand out more. And more fresh/vibrant as oppose to old and dry "texty" I think ...



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