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Generally (always a scary word in UX discussion), the user will browse a page in roughly the following way Skip the header, Flick their eyes across the title Track any "Content-y" images left to right Scan down the top half of the left most column of text There's definitely a left-side bias compared to the right when it comes to images, but left and ...


7

A Five Second test. test can help inform you not just about where your users look but about what they comprehend, and therefore whether or not the particular page you're testing is effective at achieving your objective. In a Five Second test, you show a page to users for...5 seconds and then hide the page. Then, you ask them to say or write down what they ...


2

Depends on the screen and your approach. Center is the logical choice for big screens, with left being the second best. But if you're building a responsive site, your left option will become the top one on mobile, and maybe even the only one your site visitors will see, so I'd add the more important option on the left and if needed, make it stand out by ...


2

I would make it clear to the user that there are two steps and that "selecting a category" is a first step and a required step. Also I would use a radio button for the category selection as it makes it clear for the user that he is actually selecting a choice (rather than just clicking and bg color changing) download bmml source – Wireframes ...


2

My first point of focus is probably a search box. I might ignore it if I'm hitting the result of a web search, though, as I have already completed that aspect and expect the current page to adequately present me with the reason I clicked. I want to know: Why am I here on this site? What's the most important thing for me to know to get to why I need to ...


2

I think the main problem you are dealing with is the density of information you are able to display. Using cards or a table are both good solution once you treated the real problem - what is the most appealing for the user. First, I would clear some space by removing the redondant links to "details" / "read more". In the same way, the booking button can be ...


2

Alas whatever you do with those 3 buttons, it's going to be confusing for the user because they are all physically identical. 99% of the remotes I've seen in this century have rocker buttons for the volume control and a differently shaped button (usually smaller, because it's not used as often) for mute. That also allows one to figure out what he's pressing ...


1

Remove all borders and rounded corners and keep each cell a single solid color. The best UI is no UI at all so make sure that everything you add absolutely has a reason for being there. Even simple things like borders and gradients can cause friction to the end user. I'm not sure the keyboard is even required to be there. Perhaps consider having a way ...


1

I don't actaully dislike the use of the table. It is very expressive in the information that it contains so I get a good overview of the tours that the site offers. My suggestions to improve the table could be: Move the "book" column to the right, I won't book anything without reading what it is first so putting the emphasis on the sale after I've read ...


1

I'm thinking it might not appeal to you because it is a bit text-heavy. You could consider adding icons or imagery to represent each category. That might also give you some different options with the layout (for example, your icon/image could be to the left or above your text). Centering the Category title above the supporting text might make it look a bit ...



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