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0

I imagine this would be an important thing to do in order to read the page, especially if the page is initially rendered in a language you do not understand (assuming it did not auto detect), so this should be in a prominent position at the top of the page. Typically you see this in the top right corner for websites (because corners are very prominent ...


2

Quantitative and Qualitative research will be hard to find. The Norman Nielsen Group do have an article on some aspects of what you are looking for, and also contains some guidance: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/international-web-usability/ The best advice seems to be, if you can detect the users language, then use this to default the language selector ...


1

The question as to whether diacritics should be ignored in search functions will probably get down to personal preference/opinion. However, you may find the following useful: http://cognitiveseo.com/blog/6773/the-diacritics-seo-technique-a-tactic-nobody-is-using/ https://moz.com/blog/so-you-want-to-know-about-foreign-language-seo-mozinar-q-a Note: I have ...


0

Be very careful with linking countries to languages. This is one of the all-too common UX flaws of our time. Just because I'm in Switzerland doesn't mean that I speak German (Not least because I'm in the French part of Switzerland, but that's a different issue). In our increasingly international world people in country A who prefer language B are becoming ...


1

According to the Wikipedia entry on high/low context cultureL In a higher-context culture, many things are left unsaid, letting the culture explain. Words and word choice become very important in higher-context communication, since a few words can communicate a complex message very effectively to an in-group (but less effectively outside that ...


0

In my experience from English to Spanish your layout and design patterns need to be extremely fluid. Things like product description, prices and other content elements seem to take more real estate. This of course will vary from language to language.


2

Depends on the audience, and secondarily on the subject matter. If it has been determined, or it is presumed, that the audience would not be disconcerted by the presence of multiple languages on the same page, whether or not they are able to read every one of them, then at worst there is no disadvantage in doing this. At best it makes life easier for those ...


0

I also work on a multilingual website. I doubt Americans would have much trouble comprehending British English. However, our SEO boffins pointed out that American spellings ranked much higher in Google. So, even if you cast your pages in the Queen's English, make sure your H1s and page titles are in American.


4

Stepping back a bit, one key thing to understand is the difference between EN-GB and EN-US. Realistically, spelling differences are minor and not difficult to understand for either set of users - here's a (non-exhaustive) set of examples: Prefixes and Suffixes -ize/-yze Change to -ise/-yse. (e.g. synchronise, analyse) -or Change to -our. ...


-1

I would suggest to display the dropdown at the bottom of the page because: - changing language is not the primary user task for this page - the login form has a super low learning curve, most of the user knows how to fill-in such form even if is not written in his own language - as a secondary task is not overloading the user with extra information In my ...


3

For First Layout : If it is a responsive layout, where the Change Language will shift. According to me the second layout will work good. Beause its all in center, User will concentrate only in center he do not have to search for things here and there. Even Google, Facebook have launguage change, at the bottom of the website.


0

If both languages are supported equally, then put them both in the body of the email. If most of your readers are going to be reading it on desktop, you can try putting both languages side-by-side. This can be especially good if one language is read left-to-right (ex: English, Spanish) and the other is read right-to-left (ex: Hebrew, Arabic); readers of ...


0

Know your target. I think one solution is to send the email in the language of most user you have and at top of email you can put web link for web page in which there are translation for others. In this way you can accommodate most part of your public.


1

In most cases, yes it should, as pointed out in the other answers. This is reasoned in some length in a W3C post about language negotiation, and covers especially the localisation case where there isn't necessarily a one-to-one correspondence between different language (or locale) versions. Examples: A bilingual blog contains a news section in English ...



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