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They are neither language nor currency dependent, at least not solely. They are locale specific, which is a combination of language and location. So the best UX is to not rely on language alone, but check the user's locale and format the currency according to their preferred formatting. In your example of displaying USD to a French user, check what kind of ...


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Anytime giving a personal touch to any application is a great Idea. While designing any application for the user (web or software) the initial design should not focus more on the implementation, but it does not mean that you should totally ignore the implementation. Coming back to what you asked, if the base app uses terminology that justifies the intent of ...


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I think it makes perfect sense to present the user with something in their own language. It will make them much more comfortable using, exploring, and learning your system.


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If the company physically operates in the country in question, the subsidiary or branch office will have legal liabilities and contractual obligations separate of the main entity. Since there are separate legal responsibilities, it is probably safer to serve a site that was specifically designed to match those. It also simplifies administration. If there is ...


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I can not speak with authority on the subject, but I believe it is mainly due to legal reasons. Google for example knows very well when you're browsing a site in a language different from your browser settings: it even offers to translate the page for you. However, go to www.google.com and you'll always be redirected to the country-specific version. This way ...


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A good website might a) detect your browser language settings and provide you with your preferred language or b) if using your IP to get your location and thereby assuming a language, give you an override - which it remembers - to change your preferences. Have you set your browser preferences to show your preferred language(s)?


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I think there are multiple reasons: Convenience (I myself prefer to do financial stuff in my native language. I'm just one person, but many others share this opinion) Language barrier (a lot of people still do not speak English, of which most people assume everyone is able to read/write/speak English) Ads for your locale Not knowing there is a domain of ...


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In regards to your first question I'd say let the browser language decide but if it really matters to you then a landing page with a Spanish or English button before entering would be fine and then use that decision to determine which version of the site you show. For question number two I'd say it's going to be a bit of a novel experience UX-wise if you ...


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It is a good starting point, but not always accurate. There are different ways to detect the user's language. If the IP address is used it fails for traveling users. If the browser's language is used it still fails in internet cafes, hotel lobbies, etc. Yes, it is necessary to allow users to change the language. Be careful how you present the choices: it's ...


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The label isn't necessary, and in fact if it's spelled in a language the user is not familiar with they can't even find it. Keep in mind that the primary use case for a language picker is to allow people who can not read the currently displayed language to pick a language they can read. The picker needs to be self-explanatory for someone who can not read the ...



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