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3

The reason for this is that you most likely are more familiar with left-to-right (LTR) languages, so your engrained progress is moving from the left to the right. People who are more familiar with right-to-left (RTL) languages such as Arabic or Hebrew, are likely to see a progression from the right to left as moving forward. You can see this in common ...


10

The thing is that in many languages (including Dutch and German), there is no such thing as title case. It simply does not exist, and theirfore "it looks weird" is actually already a nice way of putting it - it is simply wrong. As also highlighted by @the other one, it does not matter to the typical user how it is done in a localization that he does not use. ...


13

I don't know about iOS as Apple does not seem to have international design guidelines, but I can tell you that for example Microsoft has extensive UI guidelines regarding capitalization in different languages (including Dutch) that indeed differ from English.


33

I would imagine the typical user will only ever use one language version. The only time they will ever see another is if it installs in a different language and they have to change it. As such you should stick to the conventions for each language. It doesn't matter if it is inconsistent with others- afterall, if you were doing the Chinese version then it ...


1

It's less optimal than running a test with users who are both knowledgeable in the domain and native speakers, but it's still a very good test to run, and the results will be conclusive, as long as the users have good language skills. I've done it, and I had positive results. The big advantage of this test is that the users will have somewhat higher ...


1

I can't speak to all of your concerns, but here's some thoughts: Don't include all the weights. When I download Noto Japanese, the files are 30 MB uncompressed, but it includes 7 different weights. Choose the weights you want to use (e.g. maybe you only need Regular and Bold, 4.4 MB each) Use the Google early release API. If any other sites decide to use ...


1

While I agree that culture can & should drive decisions about content, colors, themes, imagery, etc, I'd argue that from a UX and technical perspective the language has a much greater impact on the outcome. I work with language learning products (designed primarily for a U.S. English-speaking audience) that generally share a common UI across more than ...


0

Multicultural person here (Russian + Kazakh + Czech + French). As someone born to the culture anthropologist mom, I strongly believe and know empirically cultures influence not only the surface differences for everything — UI included — such as color or CTAs but most prominently the user thinking, and that ends up in a core objectives differences. When ...



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