Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

145

Option 2 is the best option, because you'll recognize your own language regardless of your knowledge of other languages (be sure to also provide charactersets if you support for example japanese) Problems with options 1 and 3 Option 1. If you don't speak / understand the current language you may not recognize your own language. In the example germans would ...


100

Option 2 is the way to go as you should always show languages listed by the way they are written in that language. It is the way both Wikipedia and most companies that deal in many languages do it. Here is how Apple handle it: Problems with the other options Option 1 is a headache to maintain as you need to have the name of every language in every other ...


58

I would imagine the typical user will only ever use one language version. The only time they will ever see another is if it installs in a different language and they have to change it. As such you should stick to the conventions for each language. It doesn't matter if it is inconsistent with others- afterall, if you were doing the Chinese version then it ...


54

Obviously, the first thing you have to ask is the language that the user speaks, because without that information, you can't ask them meaningful questions. However, a user is coming to the site with the intent to learn a language. If you show them a list of languages, of course they're going to choose the one they want to learn. The fact that the site has ...


44

Perhaps just the opposite of what you wanted but we have in a few cases of municipalities with diverse ethnicities resorted to displaying the top languages by name and adding a globe icon for other translations. You could also try making icons with abbreviations of the language name next the actual name.


42

In short yes - unless you are dealing with a technical audience. Instead, refer to what is required in this case. If it's name, say 'Your name is required'. One useful bit of advice that all UX people should stick to is 'decode your language'. That means remove technical jargon and get rid of code names for projects and abbreviations. Many UX people coming ...


42

You can actually pull a language preference from the user's browser. Using this as a default may streamline the process and remove one of your entry barriers. Details here: JavaScript for detecting browser language preference The flexibility you offer is fantastic but it's likely the user has already taken care of this on a more global level. By no means ...


33

I don't know about iOS as Apple does not seem to have international design guidelines, but I can tell you that for example Microsoft has extensive UI guidelines regarding capitalization in different languages (including Dutch) that indeed differ from English.


29

There is no good graphical language representation. Flags work in some situations, when there are limited choices (up to 4-5 flags) and no ambiguities. They fail for multilingual countries (e.g. India, China), and can look jarring for multi-country languages (e.g. English, Spanish). ISO 2-letter codes are often confusing and unfamiliar. For instance, BS ...


25

I see two different questions being asked: how to represent a language, and how to represent a country These are entirely two different things. Representing countries is easier because there is a one-to-one correspondence with flags, you can use an approach similar to this one: For representing languages, I like how the BBC does it, showing the ...


24

A "field" wouldn't just apply to the internet (or technical manifestations of forms). Any form where the user fills in spaces contains "fields" and it's common on paper forms (such as application forms, tax return forms, etc.) to see text such as *Please complete all the fields marked with a * *, etc. So I'd say this is a widely used term in the "real ...


21

Option 2 is the best, since user can always recognize its own language. There's is a small pitfall though. If you present language selector as dropdown, user won't see any values except current auto-detected language, unless he clicks it. And if user doesn't understand currently selected language - say, already mentioned Chinese, he might won't even notice ...


19

The short answer is no, don't use country flags. http://www.456bereastreet.com/archive/200604/indicating_language_choice_flags_text_both_neither/ The preferred method is to use the name of the language in the language itself (and watch out for diacriticals, language specific capitalization, etc).


18

Do not insert hyphens, not even soft hyphens &shy; (which only appear if the browser forces a line break). This is because the user might hand-write it or read-dictate it to someone else with the hyphen. Which would be inaccurate and bad. You could however use the <wbr> element to indicate an optional word break opportunity. This will tell the ...


18

Thought I might login some fruits as well :) Having clear and descriptive labels is always recommended. So to answer your question directly: Yes you should ask as an input field with a more generic label invites ambiguity. Placing a clear label (in this case questions) above each control helps establish clear relationship between what you are asking for and ...


17

The general principle here is, as Mervin stated, feature discovery (or accidental discovery). In this specific case, it's an edge case that we really didn't design for explicitly. The more general case is for people that don't have enough rep to vote and allowing them to play around with the interface and discover the capabilities of the site and the ...


16

As much as it pains me to say it (as a Brit), if you're not going to have any localisation go with American spellings. This will be the preferred spellings for the vast majority of users - either as native speakers (Americans far outnumber the British) or as second language speakers (though there are significant number of those who use British English ...


16

I think a user using an app like that (text rendered with no accents when accents are expected) would find it to be very unprofessional. As the accents play an important role in the language, leaving them out could: Cause users to just passed off as bad grammar. Change the meaning of what you are trying to convey. Look like gibberish. As for languages ...


15

The problems with this approach are: You're choosing languages to demonstrate this that have an arguably stronger association with specific countries, so the solution seems better than it is. You are also assuming that everyone that speaks Spanish knows what the Spanish flag looks like, which is not necessarily true. Someone from Nicaragua doesn't have ...


15

Assuming you handle the changing between language versions (as in the example of your first bullet point - sending a page) in a reasonable manner, then yes, you should consider having the language in your URL, but for a reason you've not mentioned here. Note: This generally gets referred to as 'language/region' because, more often, the two letter codes are ...


15

The thing is that in many languages (including Dutch and German), there is no such thing as title case. It simply does not exist, and theirfore "it looks weird" is actually already a nice way of putting it - it is simply wrong. As also highlighted by @the other one, it does not matter to the typical user how it is done in a localization that he does not use. ...


14

There's two factors here; the first is brand image, the second is that autocorrect isn't perfect, and mistakenly swearing at people is a pretty city thing to do. First and foremost, brands want to project an image. That's probably why, aside from legal concerns, Youtube doesn't allow pornography. Legal issues aside, Youtube can't be taken seriously by a ...


13

I am not aware of any heuristics or best practices since there are different use cases depending upon the countries you are designing for. However this excellent article Global by Design : Creating a world-ready web design gives some valuable inputs: Look at the scope of designing a global template (except in unique cases) : A availability of a global ...


13

Its going to be really hard to respond to this question unless we can see a screenshot of what your interface or site currently looks like. However here are some reasons as to why you are not getting a 100% right to left F shaped pattern for your site: Your interface might not be totally right justified as explained by this article : Our usability ...


12

This may be very subjective, but to me, the term "English version" suggests that the English version is actually somehow different from the other version - not just in the language, but probably in other things as well.


12

Stock reply: It all depends on the users of the site. :D Non-stock reply: I'm with you and your colleague. If you're of the opinion the user needs the option to translate, make it high on the page, so that a non-native speaker doesn't have to hunt for as long. I'd also make sure it doesn't have huge visual weight to detract for native speakers. There's a ...


12

No, don't do such a thing automatically. It goes against two very important principles of usability: don't surprise the user, and let the user feel in control. Typing in a different language is a problem users have to solve in many situations. Therefore, everybody who has to type in a second language has already chosen an application-independent solution ...


12

There are three concerns here. Relying on color alone is an accessibility violation as someone with monochromatic vision will struggle to figure out the level of color and understand if his password is weak or strong. To quote the WCAG site 1.4.1 Use of Color: Color is not used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, ...


11

As a UX analyst for multinational companies in the Arab world (where we have designed the same sites with an English version and an Arabic version) the UI elements are pretty much the same. There is no difference between using a drop-down combo box here or there or whether radio buttons work somewhere but don't work for others. We have noticed however that ...


11

This depends on language, as well as your definition of “accent”. In English, accents are mostly used in words of French origin only, and many people would even find “role” and “fiance” preferable to “rôle” and “fiancé”. On the other hand, in Vietnamese, accents are used heavily, form part of the orthography, and can be essential for uniqueness and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible