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177

Don't do it. A lot of people (myself included) open many new tabs rather than browse in a single one. If I suddenly have a noise coming from a tab: I have to find the offending tab When I do find it, I'm annoyed with whichever company / site it is I then close the tab There is no good reason to do on a website. In an app, I would still argue against ...


44

Answer this first: Is the user expecting it? To cite some actual recommendations rather than opinions, the punkchip article Autoplay is bad for all users is 3 years old but as valid as ever. The article should be read in it's entirety, but quotes the W3C’s specification for accessibility (WCAG 2.0). There is a small note in one of the audio criterion, ...


26

While I concur with all the others who recommend not doing this, there are some (few) products where start-up sounds makes sense: Hardware boot, where the Mac startup chime and the IBM POST beep codes both signify that nothing has gone wrong with the hardware (or, alternatively, that something has gone wrong with the hardware). Depending on the hardware ...


18

It's all about expectation and convention / consensus, also in some respect it's about courtesy to your user, and not irritating them. Web Pages - No, never. The experience of opening web page which plays a sound, is widely accepted as negative. You will be hard pressed to find a popular web page/app that does this, Generally this consensus has been ...


15

I would rather go with actual workers than models. If you are asking this question on UX Q&A site, I would give you the UCD approach rather than the cogsci approach to marketing. By using actual workers in actual working conditions, you run the advantage of being transparent and conveying much more information through the image than what you could ...


13

When the web was in its dawn in the early 1990's there where a lot of different animated gifs letting the user know the page visited was "under construction". There are numerous examples on any image search, such as this one: Since then, the web have evolved and changed a lot. The under construction sign isn't used and hasn't been used since the late ...


12

few thoughts general idea is: users click on/go for things that they immediately see they will benefit from contrary, users don't go for something that isn't clear (why would I do that?) by putting screenshots you are uncovering very essence of what's inside, and here is when you have to be 100% sure it doesn't suck, if a user sees that's cool, they will ...


11

I'll answer the question from a slightly different angle... The intention would be - evoking emotions on the user - make the brandname "stick" I think that's what needs the focus. There's two issues here: evoke emotion Sound can certainly evoke emotion. However, in the context of a user trying to accomplish a task, what are the emotions they'd ...


10

This was originally a comment, because I had assumed it was considered and not used prior to this question being posted.. At the moment, these are your URLs (with "summary" being a type of action, presumably): /region /region/{action}/{id} Your question is, what should you do if someone tries to access it without an ID, like this: /region/{action} I ...


9

Which one is the main point for each website depends on what strategy best suits their particular interest, product(s), and service(s). There is no universal purpose. Some of the more common purposes for a home page are: A portal entry point to direct you to other content (e.g. youtube) An introduction to your company and what you do (e.g. most ...


9

I disagree with @Tony, and think that there should be a landing page for this, because, as you say, it feels like a clickable menu. I suppose it would be ideal to have on this three blocks, with teasers of the latest news, the latest blog entries and the best case studies. I think you need more than the links - some information to justify the page, and ...


9

The goal of this sound is to associate the brand with the listener's experience on the site. The risks of this going wrong seem to outweigh the benefits. First, the person ended up on your site hopefully through a conscious decision. So you aren't giving the user any new, useful information by playing a sound. Meanwhile, there are plenty of scenarios where ...


8

The "Log In" form is where most people have come to expect to find it, and that makes the choice logical. They would have to have a good reason to put it anywhere else. The "Sign Up" form on the other hand is the focus of the page, and is laid out in a way that makes the most sense for that task. Once again a good choice. Consistency is a good thing, as ...


7

This article on landing page best practices has these UX-related recommendations: Ensure the primary headline of your landing page matches the ad visitors clicked to get there. Make your call to action (CTA) big and position it above the fold. Use directional cues to direct attention to your CTA. A landing page should have a single purpose and ...


7

I think it's ok to make guesses about where your users were trying to go, but always provide the correct HTTP response code to indicate that the item was not found or was "Permanently Moved" and consider showing a simple message on the page in case the user really was trying to go somewhere they thought was legitimate and are confused why you redirected ...


6

The most important thing is here whether page rendering is blocked by the image download (or if the page is incredibly ugly or unusable before images load). In your specific example the rendering isn't blocking anything (though the text shifts a bit for me in Chrome). Remember that rendering time is more important than total download time; this is "Time to ...


6

The landing page of your site is a chance to grab people's attention with something that they are likely looking for. You are choosing to not grab their attention with anything, and when you don't demonstrate why staying is interesting, people will leave. As it stands now, your landing page amounts to a menu. I don't see anything that you are gaining by ...


5

Sometimes, giving the user straight options won't help. For example - I could be a real-estate agent on a tour (making me both a tourist and a real-estate agent), so which one should I chose on your site? The "thing" you need here is a Natural language UI, give the user a short paragraph, let him fill in some blanks that best describes his visit to the ...


4

As much as I generally hate About.com, I must prescribe to the opinions here: Pros and Cons of Adding Sound to Web Pages. Even if it is a little dated with its 'Invalid HTML 4.01' commentary! "You should always be careful when you use sound on web pages. After intrusive advertising, sound that turns on automatically and cannot be turned off is one of ...


4

It depends on what the typical user has come to your site/app for. Redirecting to the homepage may not be the best option when a user profile is available for example - where the information displayed is most relevant to them. A good example of this would be the current MySpace (not the new MySpace currently at the invite stage), The user may navigate to ...


4

Most mouse scroll wheels are better at vertical scrolling than horizontal scrolling. A simple vertical list is the most accessible arrangement, and that also translates easily to tablets and phones. So unless there's something compelling about horizontal scroll in this case, I'd go with the simpler solution.


4

Yes, there is evidence that in some situations, long landing pages (essentially what you described) have a significantly higher conversion rate. In short, removing other decision options gets a person to scroll down and actually see more of your site than they would have if they have to actively select each page that they want to see. This has consistently ...


4

Why not make the main page do the separation for you? Use nice big box/tiles/whatever to let the user decide why they are there on the site. Here is how codeacademy labs divides it language platforms: Here is how cydia lets you setup your environment based on your area of interest:


4

That depends. Each case is unique. Encourage or force users to create an account can enhance or reduce the value of your website, but for sure just this point will not make your site be so much better. Some projects, like Wikipedia, try to keep simple to receive contributions and do not really force you to have an account; but still offer a good ...


3

Depends upon the context of site, like whether it is a personal blog or a start-up portal. A Coming soon message , with at least some graphics , at least the logo. This will add more credibility. Also, if your site/product has a fixed launch date, you can go ahead and add a nice count down timer . Additionally, If there's a broadcast account for your ...


3

Document Hierarchy First, you have to understand that the Home Page originates from the concept of a document hierarchy. Where the top most document is referred to as the home, and all child documents in sub-categories are it's descendants. To navigate from any given point in the hierarchy to the top was to return Home. Document Structure When Applicable ...


3

Who is Casey Kidd? Why should I care? Oh great, another college kids senior web portfolio project- There aren't enough of those gunking up the internet. Unfortunately, these are just a few of the thoughts that went through my head when your site came up. Unless I knew who you are, or deliberately searched for you or your music, I would instantly bounce ...


3

I would argue that if you have the ability to fall back to a page that may be useful, you should do that rather than give a 404 error. In your example, falling back to /region when someone enters /region/summary gives the user the opportunity to select what they may have been looking for. This interrupts their flow much less than it would have if you have ...


3

Firstly, just to restate, The homepage can be different as long as the 'feeling' of the brand is still the same. Couldn't agree more. In my opinion, the current homepage doesn't provide the same feeling. On the topic of design, your app might be flat, but you can still have skeuomorphic elements. Take spendee for example (http://www.spendeeapp.com) ...


3

All your 'hard to find login' examples have one thing in common: the login buttons are in the same place. Top right corner. This is an excellent position because it is the norm. Most websites put the login button top right and most users expect the login button top right. Your question is based on the assumption that the buttons are hard to find. I guess ...



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