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0

or... Enter the two dates to compare prices on: ../../.... ../../.... [compare] Result: ../../.... ../../.... $35 $37


1

You could use: Initial Date ../../.... Comparison Date ../../.... Also Start Date ../../.... Comparison Date ../../.... or Base Date ../../.... Comparison Date ../../....


0

How about this.. with date 1 and date 2.. The idea is that you are comparing two different dates.. you clearly mention that as label/heading for the section by "Compare Prices".. and once that idea is set, then dates are just dates.. they could be date 1 date 2 etc.. you really dont have to call them anything else. OR dont put labels at all. Calendar ...


26

So the user is interested in the price history of a product? And this part of your website lets them see how much the price of that product has changed between the first date and the second date? What criteria do they use to pick the two dates? See if you can find a way to tie it to their workflow. As an alternative, and this doesn't directly answer your ...


1

Depending on a couple of factors: Assuming the user lands on a study case only from within your website, you can omit the title in the "Previous" and eliminate the repetitive entities in the next, e.g "Next: Brand 2" instead of "Next: [CASE STUDY BRAND 2]" Assuming that you go social and there is a case that the user lands on the study case from other ...


4

Let's call the container where your input boxes and their labels reside a 'section'. I would base my changes to the UI on the idea that users have a better experience when they can read through the entire section in a flow. Consider placing appropriate labels to facilitate that. Compare prices between _____ and _____. or See how the prices changed from ...


8

Assuming the rest of the form makes it clear how this is supposed to work, you don't need separate labels:


17

I think you're missing an element of the form. Trying to explain each individual field rather than the purpose of those two fields as a whole. Think of this from an accessibility perspective. If someone is using a screenreader to read out the elements on the page, so they get no visual cues as to the fields, what would they expect? Therefore I would go ...


2

How about: compare price at _____ and ______.


3

Ok, nobody coined this in both discussions, so here is something interesting for you to consider about the power of the opt-out. There was a rather famous study on organ transplant donations consent rates in psychology. …you will notice that pairs of similar countries have very different levels of organ donations. For example, take the following pairs ...


3

I would always use a positive statement because it is easier to understand, especially in the context of a checkbox. Mentally replace the checkbox with simply YES or NO. Then your statements are: YES: Send email notifications NO: Send email notifications YES: Don't send email notifications NO: Don't send email notifications I think the first ...


0

One of the UX 101 principles is to always allow users to recover easily from mistakes. Therefore, I'd never irrevocably delete anything. Put it in trash or provide an Undo, but don't ever immolate anything. People make mistakes. (They even make mistakes on those annoying "Are you sure you want to..." confirmations.)


0

"we should not then require "education" and indoctrination of the user to change their mind about what the word means. Right?" No. We should not educate or indoctrinate the users. Your application is not the place to do it. Distinguish between the metaphor and action. Trash and Archive are Metaphors just like Delete. You are not actually "deleting", just ...


1

Virtually every modern operating system defaults "deleting" actions to the trash, to the point that when a trash can is not used the dialogue often has caveats about how this action "can't be undone" or "do you want to permanently delete this from your computer?" There is enough inertia with the concept of "deleted things are moved to a quarantine location ...


0

A common way to handle this is by adding the selected country to a list of search filters, and then allowing the filters that have already been added to be deleted. Here is a rather crude example: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups After selecting a country, the drop-down is replaced with a deletable tag: ...


0

Personally, id go with "Any Country" simply because it implies that no filter would be applied to the selection. As far as the other choices, I agree that "No country", "...", and blank can sound unclear. Have you considered "None" or "Other".


0

Since this select is a filter how about "No Filter"?


0

The answer is simple actually: Yes, if a button says delete, it should delete.  A button should do what it claims to do. As you said in the comments, the word delete is used inaccurately too often and actually means that the subject is going to be destroyed so that it doesn't exist anymore and therefore can't be recovered. From an UX perspective however ...


0

Delete is weirdly ambiguous from the backend perspective it's true. I'd say the word delete is fine generally, but yes it does not at all seem final. The two tiered process of trash, empty trash is such a common convention now. Maybe, if it's a real delete, just go directly to calling it 'empty trash' from the get go (that's mostly a joke). If you want to ...


6

This could be solved linguistically: Trash You don't want it anymore, but if you accidentally drop something in the bin, you can still pick it out again. This is how many web-mail systems and cloud storage providers already work.


2

If a button says "Delete", should it not actually delete the file so that it cannot be recovered? Answer depends on whether the data that you are deleting belongs to the user (if it is consumer app and decision to buy & use the app belongs to the user) or an organization (if it is an enterprise app and user is told to use this app to run this ...


1

TL;DR - Of the solutions below, I think that the Gmail solution (#3) is best, especially if supplemented with a dynamic tooltip. (I might also replace the minus sign.) Its checkbox is supplemented by a dropdown (which I consider optional), but both are compact. The dropdown not only clarifies the "Select All" and "Select None" options, but can ...



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