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1

A floppy disk had a pretty small capacity, and could generally only store one thing or a small set of things. 5 1/4" floppies, notably, had plenty of room to write vs. the amount stored. (Leaving aside the bit where writing on a 5 1/4" floppy with a ball point pen was asking for disk damage.) Likewise, because they didn't store much, you usually had a LOT ...


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Two reasons: Flash drives are, in contrast to floppy disks, seldom used to store data permanently. They are used for temporary storage mostly. E.g. transfer data from one computer to another, hand over a large collection of photo's to another person etc. For permanent storage we use harddisks and/or cloud storage these days. Floppy disks where often used ...


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I'm not sure about this, other than the incredibly small drives seen here: and gimmicky flash drives like so: Most flash drives have plenty of affordance for labels: Of course you would have to add your own labels though, which is likely because most people outside of the technology sector don't carry multiple flash drives so they don't need to ...


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1. Pre-filling a text input increases cognitive load The function of a text input is to get text from a user. We need to tell a user what kind of text we are expecting and this can be done using labels, placeholders, inline hints, etc. A label directly above the text input is the best way to communicate what a user should input. As you have already ...


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This is a long discussion. For starters, this is a mobile driven solution, and like with almost anything in "mobile first" scenarios, there's a lot of voices attacking or defending the literal translation of these mobile solutions. First of all, I'd strongly recommend you to read the why and how the floating label pattern was created, by his creator. As you ...


0

Original Question: "When to use TWO and When to use 2? Each Electric battery provides Two kWh of plug-in energy storage for $700. or Each Electric battery provides 2 kWh of plug-in energy storage for $700" Your question falls within Engineering or Technical writing and not Chicago or AP style. When referencing Technical writing, as in a formula, always use ...


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I think they are a perfect solution, as the interaction is right where the explanation is of what you'll fill in. Its as close as it can get, so there should be no confusion as to where one should click to start editing. It's the most natural mapping :-) Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_mapping_(interface_design)


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MS Outlook could be of use in this situation:


4

You could update the labels to read like the sentence in natural language. Use default values for the secondary field so the user isn't forced to provide input. Frequency [ weekly v] for [ 2 ] weeks [ monthly v] for [ 2 ] months Or allow mode selection for termination [ weekly v] [ for v] [ 2 ] weeks [ weekly v] [ until v] [ {next week's ...


3

Why not just set the label relevant to the selection from the first menu. So if they choose "Weekly" set the label to "Weeks" so when they pick 7 they'll know they're setting "7 weeks". Same for Daily/Days, Yearly/Years. You could also test putting a # sign or "Number of " in front of it so it will read "# weeks" or "number of weeks", that way it will ...


6

"Repeat this event until" and then have a date selector. edit: date.


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1 kilobyte (kB) is 1000 bytes 1 kilobyte (KB) is 1024 bytes (some confusion) To address this confusion 1024 bytes are called a kibibyte(i.e., kilo binary byte) or 1 KiB. Google unit converter reference


0

I see there being two obvious solutions here: 1) You can just wrap it so it'll go to the next line (not very pretty probably) 2) Have a tooltip that show the full title on hover (this is done common enough that your user may expect this to happen).



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