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0

Many pie charts have a few wedges which add up to more than 99%, plus a few other values which make up the remaining 1%. A normal way to handle those is to have an "everything else" wedge whose width is artificially forced large enough to be visible (maybe 0.2% or so), and then have a call-out listing the contents of that wedge. Such an approach would seem ...


0

We've already established that the person who asked the question wants a pie chart, so the answer should be focused on how to represent the information and values in that chart (whether it should be used or not is another consideration altogether). So in addressing that point, you could look at two things: Adding labels where appropriate (this could be on ...


1

If you have a bar chart and one of the columns is empty you don't hide the column (and the consequently the connected label). The same should be true for the pie chart. However, interestingly Google charts does the opposite and actually hides it by default - see this jsfiddle of a pie chart where the percentage of time for eating is zero.


19

Don't use a pie chart Your problem stems from the fact you're using a pie chart. Pie charts are simply not a very good way of representing data (see here, here, here or here for some discussions of why) and you've stumbled on one of the reasons why: they can't represent data with a value of 0. They're also almost impossible to accurately read the values off ...


2

The answer here depends on how the charts are being used. If the charts are historically factual (the data that they represent is fixed and will not change over time), extra legend entries for zero values are just noise that gets in the way of the users understanding of the chart. However, if the charts are constantly changing, you need to signal to your ...


27

Yes, show it. The data IS important. Others gave given good reasons (the inclusion of Oranges clarifies they HAD been taken into account) and suggestions (show percentages or numbers, show a thin line if >0 but v. low). Here is a clearer example of why it would be a bad idea to not include zero-sized elements in the legend: Assume we have 0 apples, as ...


2

I would suggest that if "0% oranges" is the main point of significance, then the pie chart is the wrong way to display the data. If, on the other hand, 0% oranges is no more significant than (say) 1% oranges, because you know your standard deviation is a fraction of a percent or larger, then I'd display a thin orange radius so readers don't think there's a ...


48

How about his. show the percentage in the legend: Apples (20%) Melons (80%) Oranges (0%)


78

Show the numbers. If the user selected three fruits to be shown, Apples, Oranges, and Melons, and only sees Apples and Melons in the pie and in the legend, they will wonder where the Oranges went. If the Oranges are shown in the legend but not in the pie, again they will look for the tiny slice of Orange with a magnifying glass. Therefore, show the ...


14

Definitely keep it in the legend. If you only have the two items in the legend it looks like you created a chart to show the comparison of Apples and Melons. For all the user knows there could be twice as many Oranges and you simply didn't include them in this data. Since Oranges are included you need to show that. A second reason would be if the user ...


0

By "open card sorting", you mean to let participants create cards for the existing functionalities (including new as well as existing ones) and the group these cards, I assume. Sounds like a good approach to me. I am a little worried about your statement "we are creating a new section", which sounds like someone in your company decided these 4 new ...



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