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Card sorting is a great method for you to use to get a better understanding of how your users group the information or functionality available to them. Doing the open card sort will also help generate ideas for what to label the groupings. You'll definitely want to include more cards from across your product. There's also label criteria that you can rate ...


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It depends. What's the typical and expected duration where these issues are open? If they're suppose to be dealt with very rapidly, i.e. within minutes, Then option two showing duration first is helpful to emphasize that. On the other hand, if tickets are dealt with more in the days range or months, then the duration itself is less important. Difference ...


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It's common for developers to use past tense for implying dates (created, printed, deleted, etc.) because it's semantically correct and short. But there's no need to shorten the form labels as long as the form layout allows it. That's why I would recommend to prepend the "date" suffix. But in the end, this question might not be relevant anymore if you ...


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I guess this is another "depends-on" answer: If the designer has control over the labels (i.e., no user-created or user-named tabs) and over the space available (i.e., no resizing of panels and windows), the designer might choose the equal-width design. In all other cases, I would (as a designer) opt for the dynamic width, because it may display more ...


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The task of a label is to unambiguously identify the meaning of the value associated. The task of a label is not to be consistently worded with all other labels on the screens (and this probably reveals my preference :-). But apart from anyone's preferences (be it UXD, QA, or DEV), the ultimate benchmark is the user. Ask 10 potential users of the software ...


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Perhaps #7: Have icons or small images on the left of each block (aligned to the top of each block of text) that represent continent/world, country, city. You could tailor the icons to the specific continent country, and even city, but possibly three icons that just illustrate the level of "focus" is sufficient. (I'm not sure of the etiquette of including/...


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I'm sorry but icons simply aren't the primary content here. Icons are nice. Labels are good. Good labels are critical. If there are so many buttons or controls that it's a struggle to include the accompanying text, then it's the structure of the layout that's at fault not the inclusion of the labels. Take a step back. Lets say the labels are non negotiable ...


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I think you should go with help-mode switch because a lot of users are going to use it when they get lost and more advance users would understand the icons as longest is good iconography. Don't rely in first screen tutorials because it is been prove people skip those all the time. no matter how many animations you add they don't work trust me Force touch ...


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Firstly, do not change the values on either axis without alerting the user to the fact that they have changed. By changing the values you are creating a moving reference point which is not usually a good thing. It sounds like you're getting stuck with the idea that the axis markers determine the resolution of the graph. This doesn't have to be the case. You ...


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There's a very good read from Aurora Bedford on icon usability: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/icon-usability/ and there's a section arguing that "icons need a text label": To help overcome the ambiguity that almost all icons face, a text label must be present alongside an icon to clarify its meaning in that particular context. (And even if you’re ...


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Try to stick with the mobile-os standards. On Android, long-pressing an ActionBar/Toolbar icon will show the label as a small pop-up in every app that uses the default ActionBar/Toolbar. I can't speak for iOS, but most apps on iOS i know use a permanently visible label below the icon. Please do not try to create a layout that fits different OS's if you want ...


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If you need more space to show labels for the actions then I think it would be best to have less actions visible at one time and give them each enough space. This would mean being very clever in two ways Knowing what actions the user is most likely going to use to have them visible (this might be different for different users, and might even change over ...


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One solution would be to add undo buttons to every action. That way, users would become comfortable experimenting, with pushing buttons they don't fully understand. Once they tap something, the app would demonstrate the effects of that action, and give the user a better understanding than any tooltip would. At that point, if the button did what they want, ...


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Assuming that you are targeting Android and iOS devices, you should try to use icons that are already known to users and popular among the Android/iOS ecosystem. For web, you could use Material Design Lite or Polymer to do the same. You can see a list of icons following Material Design for Android here. Now, if you have any icon that is not accurately ...


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I've asked Your questions to our lead ux tester and she answered the next: That is a very good idea - and also proved to be useful - to let the user turn on textual controls or function titles alongside icons on their wish and that is even better when this 'help' switch is available on every page consistently at the same place - but if You put it ...



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