New answers tagged

5

If I design a "Press any key to X" screen You probably should avoid doing this in the first place. Consider the following. For most ordinary people using your software, "any key", taken literally, certainly includes the key labelled Esc". "any key", includes shift. And caps-lock and num-lock. "any key", includes the key labeled SysRq (System ...


1

The current international standard layouts are all based on the staggered QWERTY type layout - We all recognise it as a keyboard for typing text into - so much so that it's often used as the icon for adding text to something. Dvorak and other standards have gained popularity in recent years but I think we are far from a point where they can be considered ...


3

Here's a part of answer. I'm gonna take a simple example. French language uses a lot of é and è. These characters are located respectively on the 2 key and the 7 key. In fact, there's used so often that, without pressing the shift key, pressing on the 2 or 7 key will print not the number, but the é or è character. This is different from an english ...


1

Numpads are on the right-hand side to make basic calculations faster for majority of the population. Numpad is redundant part of the keyboard, added to make basic calculations (addition / subtraction / multiplication / division) faster. Studies show that approximately 90% of the population is right-handed. Thus, to maximise its utility, numpad is placed on ...


1

I will add one additional item that the other answers have not hit on is that Blackberry has a multitude of patents covering physical keyboards making it extremely difficult to not infringe on their IP. Here are some examples- Hand-held electronic device with a keyboard optimized for use with the thumbs Ramped-key keyboard for a handheld mobile ...


44

While space is an obvious part of the equation, it's not the main one, you could simply have a sliding physical keyboard just as previous generations of smartphones and be a happy camper. However, physical keyboards had several issues: smaller keys than on-screen keys structural weakness short lifetime (the flex connector and pieces of sliding keyboards ...


2

The reason why apple specifically veered away from a physical keyboard was because of this question: "If I don't want a keyboard, why do I need to have one present?" This truly speaks to the idea that simplicity is key. A use case: I'm watching a video - I don't need a keyboard, infact, I need more screen space. But when it does come down to writing ...


0

I think it's because of the way we use our rectangles. Although not sure, I would be willing to bet that most of the time we are not typing on our devices. By not having a dedicated physical keyboard, we can repurpose different parts of the screen depending on the context of use at any given moment. This would also reduce points of failure on a device, ...


9

A keyboard has obvious costs: Increased device size. Reduced space for a screen. Mechanical complexity/manufacturing costs. The need to localize the keyboard to different languages. On the other hand, the main benefit of a keyboard was easier data entry. At one point, a keyboard was worth it despite the costs, for this reason, because touch screens were ...


33

What caused this decline in the use of physical keyboards? The iPhone What is the impact on the UX of mobile devices? This is a pretty deep question and is tough to answer objectively. I would argue that dropping the physical keyboard was a net gain. That the benefits it brought far outweighed the usefulness of the physical keyboard. As others have ...


4

This is actually a really good example of Darwinian evolution in action: The natural analog might be something like a flight-capable wing on an ostrich: The natural habitat for ostriches favours running for a bird of that size. A large wing would only cause drag and use energy and nutrients that would be better spent on powerful legs - many thousands of ...


2

In the past people used to use cellphones mainly to talk and text only, nowadays people doesn't use smartphones JUST for that, so you don't need to use the keyboard all the time but just on demand which allows to place a bigger screen to offer an overall better experience without losing any functionality. It's a cost benefit adaptation, you can emulate a ...


23

The main reason is versatility. A keyboard in software can be easily adapted to different layouts, different character/symbol sets and different cultures. In addition, custom keyboards such as Swype or Word Flow are then feasible. Physical keyboards add to the physical complexity of the device, have to be revealed (deployed) to be usable and are more ...


5

Most probably because of 2 trends in the smartphone industry. Phones get thinner and thinner, and losing a physical keyboard makes a phone a lot less thick. Screens on phones kept getting bigger, and started using touchscreen. The combination of these gave to option to type on your screen by tabbing a "digital" keyboard. The downside to this though, is ...



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