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I have used Tab for Tab keypress, tabs to represent UI element There are different cases of user interaction here. Jump tabs in sequential order Jump tabs in non-sequential order Visibility of status on next tab expectation Having a Next button at the bottom of every form communicates the upcoming status of the screen. But, when the interaction is ...


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You can also try other keys than the "traditional" Arrow/WASD, like: QWAS 1245 (Numpad)


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For completeness`s sake, here is one possible solution to communicate the controls to the user I played around with. By showing the user the control keys directly in the level, I try to minimize the confusion, as the user is reminded of the control scheme at all times. It is noteworthy that this seems not to work as well with the arrow-keys, as an ...


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Using the up arrow for either northeast or northwest seems fine to me. Which? It doesn't matter As others have mentioned, the feedback loop is so fast that the user will figure it out quickly. But: Up arrow = northeast This seems the most intuitive, because (English speakers at least) associate forwards with right. And if you're still worried: Make the ...


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I think the Pacman example shows the answer. The confusion is in the way the figure is standing. If you set the figure in a three-quarter view, and give the figure a (three-quarter) face, it then becomes obvious which way is forward, left, right, etc.


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Learned helplessness is going to forever be your enemy. No matter what you do to make your login form super-efficient, there will always be some other forms out there. As soon as a user tries to tab on a poorly designed login page and the focus jumps to some random link, or completely fails to appear, they will fall back on their trusty click-to-input ...


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I can imagine two more ways (apart from the ones already presented) for this: Separating direction change from position change Left-Right for direction: The first consist in using left/right arrows to turn the character left/right without leaving the square. Forward-Backward for changing position/step: Then using forward/backward arrows to move to the ...


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Why is there no standard layout for computer keyboards? Because there is no keyboard governing body mandating everyone build keyboards the same way. That and history...every computer design had its own keyboard designed for the particular needs of the hardware and software being used. Over time, keyboards have become much more similar than different, ...


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An isometric view of a game doesn't have to be presented as a symmetric view. For example PacMania is pacman with a pseudo-3D isometric view, but still lets you use the left-right, up-down keys without ambiguity in their direction.


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History shows a few approaches of handling isometric controls. The oldest game to use absolute isometric controls I can think of is Q Bert: This was usually played on the joystick - which had 8 directions, not just the 4 arrow keys. Interestingly, though, instead of using diagonal movement on the joystick. you were supposed to tilt the whole joystick, ...


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Very few isometric games have a keyboard control scheme. The few I remember playing that used the arrow keys to move treated a single key as an orthogonal direction. To get diagonal movement you needed to press two keys like down and right. Some even mapped all 8 surrounding squares to the numbers on the keypad (except 5) so you had a full range of motion. ...


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If you want it to be intuitive then you could be a bit clever about it. Add an item into the level a few squares away from them, and tell them to "Using The Arrow Keys, Move Forward Towards The Macguffin" Then whatever button they use to do this is the one you map to that direction. That way you're matching their own mental model of how the navigation ...


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First, there is some standard. We have the QUERTY arrangement, CTRL, SHIFT, ALT and ENTER are arranged more or less the same. Your question is actually "why are not all keyboards have identical layout?". So it is the same as asking "why are not all toasters/refrigerators/ovens/cars have identical layout"? It may be all about money. Some possible answers to ...


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The context menu key – along with the Windows keys – is the most recent addition to the PC keyboard. The Microsoft Natural Keyboard, released ca. 1994–1995, was the first one to include them "for future uses". That "future use" was the UI introduced with Windows 95 – the first to make heavy use of context menus. The latter were around in previous versions ...



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