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1

I can imagine two more ways (apart from the ones already presented) for this: Separating direction change from position change Left-Right for direction: The first consist in using left/right arrows to turn the character left/right without leaving the square. Forward-Backward for changing position/step: Then using forward/backward arrows to move to the ...


1

Why is there no standard layout for computer keyboards? Because there is no keyboard governing body mandating everyone build keyboards the same way. That and history...every computer design had its own keyboard designed for the particular needs of the hardware and software being used. Over time, keyboards have become much more similar than different, ...


12

An isometric view of a game doesn't have to be presented as a symmetric view. For example PacMania is pacman with a pseudo-3D isometric view, but still lets you use the left-right, up-down keys without ambiguity in their direction.


4

History shows a few approaches of handling isometric controls. The oldest game to use absolute isometric controls I can think of is Q Bert: This was usually played on the joystick - which had 8 directions, not just the 4 arrow keys. Interestingly, though, instead of using diagonal movement on the joystick. you were supposed to tilt the whole joystick, ...


17

Very few isometric games have a keyboard control scheme. The few I remember playing that used the arrow keys to move treated a single key as an orthogonal direction. To get diagonal movement you needed to press two keys like down and right. Some even mapped all 8 surrounding squares to the numbers on the keypad (except 5) so you had a full range of motion. ...


9

If you want it to be intuitive then you could be a bit clever about it. Add an item into the level a few squares away from them, and tell them to "Using The Arrow Keys, Move Forward Towards The Macguffin" Then whatever button they use to do this is the one you map to that direction. That way you're matching their own mental model of how the navigation ...


2

First, there is some standard. We have the QUERTY arrangement, CTRL, SHIFT, ALT and ENTER are arranged more or less the same. Your question is actually "why are not all keyboards have identical layout?". So it is the same as asking "why are not all toasters/refrigerators/ovens/cars have identical layout"? It may be all about money. Some possible answers to ...


1

The context menu key – along with the Windows keys – is the most recent addition to the PC keyboard. The Microsoft Natural Keyboard, released ca. 1994–1995, was the first one to include them "for future uses". That "future use" was the UI introduced with Windows 95 – the first to make heavy use of context menus. The latter were around in previous versions ...


1

Before mice, there was no programming method to show a context menu. When mice appeared, there was no right-click. When extra buttons appeared, then the context menu made sense whenever applications were programmed for it. A context menu key on the keyboard usually did nothing, and when it did, the mouse was a better interface to show the menu. Web ...


9

Back in the mists of time, before the mouse was so ubiquitous, most people navigated their file system using just a keyboard (I am old enough to have actually worked like this!). Opening files was simple: you left'ed, right'ed, up'd, down'd and tabbed your way to the file and hit enter. The problem came, however, when you wanted to do something with the file ...


1

It depends on the use case. Many laptops have done away with the key because of space limitations and the need to fit the arrow keys in the bottom right corner. Many full-size desktop keyboards have removed it in place of other keys. Frankly, most people don't use that context key. Here's why: most of us are right handed, so if we use it, we'll use the left ...


0

I would go with option 2, but instead of calling the button "Next Tab" I would be more explicit- "Continue to section Foo to continue entering information about Bar" (and with text that long, consider a clickable hyperlink instead of a button). Likewise, the Previous Tab button could say "Return to section Foo to edit your information about Bar". As for ...


1

In the years I have been Using computers (and typewriters for that matter), I have seen three schools of thought in keyboard design. I am going to call them the minimalists, the bells and whistles crowd, and the moderates. The minimalist battle cry varies from 'look at those clean lines' or 'nothing to get in your way' to 'save money' or 'save space'. The ...


5

I can't speak for everyone, but I'm a heavy keyboard user and I think I can count on one hand the number of times I've used that key. (mostly because my mouse was acting up/battery died). I think it is a key that just didn't have a really good (to many) purpose. PS pressing Shift + F10 still works as a keyboard shortcut. For what it's worth I fully ...



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