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2

I'm not sure it is a standard per-se, but it is certainly very common. It's commonly known as "auto correct" but is really just a form of error correction algorithm. To illustrate the extent of what's happening, there are keyboards that take this much farther than merely looking at what keys you're pressing, and actually allow you to draw words: ...


0

Yes, this is already done by mobile keyboards although with varied results. The iPhone keyboards tend to do much better than Android keyboards at interpolation. If you have an Android device I'd suggest trying out the various keyboards available (Google keyboard, swiftkey, etc) to assess how they do interpolation and word completion. I am not as up to ...


2

Yes, it's a fact. I recall every usable key of Spanish and English layouts. It's just practice! I've asked myself the same questions you're asking here, but my solution comes without my awareness. In my first job they provided me with a notebook for programming and it happened to have a English keyboard layout. Then I realized that the distribution was ...


4

Why are keyboards still the predominant input device? Short answer : The keyboard has prevailed because its tactile properties, flexibility and efficiency have not yet been surpassed by other technologies. Longer answer: It all boils down to what exactly the keyboard was and intended to do! The evolution of the keyboard from the printing press to ...


2

I very much suspect that the foundation of your question is flawed. Whilst the keyboard is doubtless the primary input device for the Personal Computer, human interaction with computers is not bound by that limit. Just consider all the user experiences that a human may have with a computer every day. Communication/Entertainment: Smart TV Telephony Smart ...


0

The main reason is simply that the vast majority of tasks and time spent on a computer by any human deals with text. Most people don't use a computer for much other than reading or writing text in some form, be it logging on to myface, typing in the latest chicken pie recipes, reading a volume of "Lord of the Potters" or searching on yougle. For dealing ...


0

Maybe the keyboard already isn't the predominant input device anymore. An estimate that is already over a year old suggests that there are more smartphones than PCs in the world. People probably don't develop software or write books with them but they search the web, write email, blog, etc. Now, if you are a 30-something working in IT in North America or ...


1

In addition to legacy applications, some more recent applications use this key as a key that is unlikely to conflict with other applications. For instance, the XFire social gaming program has a chat overlay that be shown during full screen games. Games tend to have a lot of special key bindings, so XFire chose to use Scroll Lock + X as the hotkey to load ...


0

A one-sentence version of Turch's answer: Because you use keyboard by fingers. How many fingers do you have? Compare that number to the number of mouth (voice input), wrists (mouse). The more fingers you have, the more combinations can be done. What about touching screen and controller, they all use fingers? I haven't had a chance to use real touching ...


1

It takes years of practice to become a good touch typist. It's not something you can relearn overnight - so basically the interface has to remain physically the same to be usable. ADDED: And I therefore because one has a 'lot invested' in using a keyboard there's a tendency to stick to the keyboard if some other method requires time and effort to learn. ...


0

In addition to the above (useful for accountants &c) function, you need to realize that for many people it is not a "numpad", it is the cursor key pad, and it is those extraneous, awkwardly arranged, duplicate cursor keys between the alphanumeric and cursor keys that are the problem. I'd love to find a keyboard without them.


1

Love this question. Let's also remember that keyboards as a means of using the digits to communicate ideas predate computers by at least hundreds of years. I began studying piano nearly forty years ago, and about three years ago took up bayan, or Russian chromatic button accordion. Have been a rather comfortable and fast hunt-and-pecker for decades and just ...


2

The reason they have stayed essentially the same doesn't have a lot to do with UX. It's mostly due the market. If you're selling a text input device, you want it to be mostly interoperable with what people are used to and with the hardware and software they are using. There are variations, but the markets for those are small simply because most people ...


1

I think it's incorrect to claim that keyboards haven't changed. There have been at least 3 significantly different designs since the IBM PC was introduced. From the original design with function keys on the left http://www.vintage-computer.com/ibm_pc.shtml to the AT 101+ version with function keys on the top and those annoying duplicated cursor keys, to ...


18

Their usefulness scales beautifully with experience and developed skill Someone who knows only a little bit of numbers and letters can use a keyboard for a variety of tasks, even without knowing about the importance of the "shift key". As each button on the keyboard is labeled clearly with what each key will output when pressed, a person can guess quite ...


9

Keyboards are the ideal human/computer interface design until we can directly control computers with our minds. That's a bold statement, especially since most depictions of the future in popular culture show us all the cool ways we will be able to interface with a computer. To back that statement up, I'm going to define the problem keyboards solve first. ...


40

Rewobs answer is already excellent, but for a deeper understanding it's valuable to consider what alternatives we have. Chorded keyboard Already in the mother of all demos in 1968 an alternative input device was proposed: the chorded keyboard (though the concept is even older). The idea is that instead of moving your fingers to dedicated keys one at a ...


-2

Eventually speaking to a computer will dethrone keyboards. HCI experts have been saying this since the 90s. Better keyboard experiences have existed since the 30s (DVORAK) but the cost of re-learning to type is too high and convention wins out. In many situations, convention always wins. We have 60 seconds in a minute instead of 100. 12 hours in the morning ...


4

Keyboards have won and remain unchanged because of accuracy and they conveniently have an alphabet on them which is nice. A keyboard key has two states, pressed and not pressed, highly reliable and accurate. Spelling deficiencies and jumbo-hand syndrome can be corrected through either education or providing a keyboard which meets their size needs. Other ...


65

Because of: Familiarity: Everyone has more or less learned to use it and a lot of users don't even need to take a look at at individual keys to type. Although not physically, it's present and has the same layout across devices. Usefulness: You can perform an incredible HUGE variety of task just with a keyboard. Accessibility: It provides an accessible ...



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