Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

47

Because there is no feedback of the clipboard state. Pressing CTRL+C multiple times gives the guaranteed impression the right data is in the clipboard, just before the next action (CTRL+V, possible). CTRL+X does have visual feedback, as the data either disappears or changes view (in case of file). You are not the only one who does it.


30

What We Know So Far: The first browser did not use Backspace to go back a page: Several Mosaic menu or button functions have keyboard equivalents. Among them: b, equivalent to the Back button Source: http://www.uoxray.uoregon.edu/local/manuals/biosym/discovery/Html_Help/navigating.html First Netscape Navigator (evolved from Mosaic) Did Not Use ...


21

I can think of a few reasons. It's a simpler mental model. You copy something and you paste it. You don't paste the result of some transformation of the object you copied, you get the exact same object you picked up. Simpler actions are better in that they are more predictable and less confusing. It's called "paste", it's not called "remove formatting and ...


21

This is not a new pattern. The reason is simply that there's no feedback. You can't see whether the copy succeeded. That's why people tend to press it a couple of times, just to be sure. See the second answer to this question: Why do people clear the screen multiple times when using a calculator? Calculators obviously have a state, since they do ...


20

The answer is more trivial than you probably think - it's because h, j, k, l were respectively left, down, up, right arrows on the ADM-3A terminal which Bill Joy used when creating the original Vi [1]. [1] http://www.catonmat.net/blog/why-vim-uses-hjkl-as-arrow-keys/


19

You could try to approach this with an, "tell them about better ways to do what they are doing when they do it" approach. For example, if I am selecting text and clicking bold, that is fine, but if I do that over and over maybe have a modeless (non disruptive, out of the way) notification that could say something like, "Did you know you can press ctrl-b to ...


18

In general, yes, keyboard shortcuts have been shown to be effective. Some research suggests (1) that having keyboard shortcuts in a web app improves revisitation. In general, keyboard shortcuts enable power user activity. Keyboard shortcuts also improve accessibility. (2) You also have the evidence of what the major players in the field are doing (i.e., ...


18

Keyboard The Shift modifier is used for keyboard selection as well, and not just for single selection. No matter where you are, no matter how long the list, [Shift] + [END] selects everything from your current item focus to the end of the list, [Shift] + [PgDwn] one page (however that is defined). This also combines with the word jump of Ctrl where ...


18

I don't know how it started but I can add my two cents about what ALL my clients say: $%!$% what the @$#%#% just happened? Why did the page change? Now I have to fill in that form all over again. I would love to see this go away for good, and the first thing I do when building a form laden website is the following jQuery script: var hasfocus = 'false'; ...


14

The Insert key is a perfectly reasonable choice. I’d like to see that become the standard. Might as well start with you. If you are currently using Insert to toggle into overtype mode, don’t. Overtype mode does more harm than good, and that kind of use of the insert key is inconsistent with how other keys are used. MS Word abandoned overtype mode years ago. ...


13

I don't see the need for any new studies in this area. The issue is that people usually take the results out of context. You can't comparing using a mouse to learning a keyboard command and then using it. Apples and oranges. Let me summarise what we know. If you don't know the keyboard command, it is usually faster to use the mouse as it has a lower ...


13

Not a complete answer, but some thoughts about why drag-and-select is not so good. Dragging with a pressed mouse button is physically hard to do. You have to keep a constant pressure on the mouse button, and if it becomes too light, your work is undone. Too much pressure and the mouse can't glide well, and the cheap ones feel like they will fall apart in ...


12

If I were you, I would add tooltips like on Microsoft Excel 2010 and add help page with a list of shortcuts (something like this). I think that should be enough. Screenshot of russian Microsoft Excel, displaying tooltip when hovering over bold icon.


11

I'll put in an answer myself here... (Hopefully this will inspire to submit more research links...) Searching the ACM digital library and a few other resources I found a few related articles. Categorization costs for hierarchical keyboard commands (2011) by Miller, Denkov and Omanson Summary Previous research comparing methods of issuing commands ...


11

Delete sould not delete the row. Delete should delete the content of the cell. CTRL+Delete should delete the row. CTRL+Insert should insert a new row.


10

To facilitate the discovery of shortcuts you can provide information of some shortcuts when the CTRL key is pressed. In this way, when the user uses a basic shortcut (e.g., CTRL+C to copy) small tooltips can appear over the ribbon to indicate that more shortcuts are available. Another option to announce the availability of shortcuts is to indicate them in ...


10

It depends on what operating system you're used to. But beeing a Windows guy, I still think Mac uses the right shortcut. CTRL + F for find (where you also can replace), is the most intuitive shortcut IMHO.


10

Yes, this will improve efficiency. For desktop users, it will mean that users who are not yet in position to use the keyboard will be able to proceed without delay (which reduces your GOMS or KLM score). For touch users, it means that the user does not have to rely on the often rather fiddly native text paste controls. That being said, I am unsure about ...


10

How did this come about? In 2005 this was implemented on Mozilla Firefox for the following reasons: The backspace key was mapped to the browser ‘Back’ function in Mozilla for consistency with Internet Explorer. However, to improve consistency with other applications running on Linux, it was decided that this mapping should be optional—and set ...


9

It's an interesting approach that I could see some application for, however not in its current form. Change the way that it works so that it only creates a new field when some content is entered into the field and not when the field is selected. That way it is still possible to tab through to the Save button.


9

For the menus, the standard is to display the shortcut at the right of the command (and probably at the left for RTL locales). Example: Photoshop. For the buttons and similar elements, shortcut keys are not displayed for a good reason: there is no enough visual space for it. Don't forget that shortcuts should be configurable (especially if the default ...


8

I don't design desktop applications so I don't have much experience with options there, but I can give you some examples that might inspire. Gmail I've also always liked how Gmail does keyboard shortcuts. They're very simple, not requiring you to learn and use multiple keys at the same time and you can pop open a pane displaying all of them just by typing ...


8

The best way is to not force someone to use anything. Keep a configuration file and allow your application's users to tailor keyboard shortcuts to their liking. If you don't want to implement that however, go with standard conventions. For example, opening a new tab is usually Ctrl+T (DakotahNorth's right - Ctrl+N is standard for new window).


8

Key Stroke Modeling(KLM) that is part of GOMS method has some answers regarding this. According to an article by Jeff Sauro: Card, Moran and Newell brought in hundreds of users and had them complete tasks repeatedly. They decomposed large tasks like typing a letter or using a spreadsheet into millisecond level actions (called operators). They found just ...


8

What Apple decided to do with the "Cut and Paste" procedure in Windows is simply to combine them into one action, Move. Or: drag = move option+drag=copy With OSX the user applies direct manipulation by dragging a file or a group of files between folders, rather than selecting and cutting them out into some virtual un-graspable medium. Whether it ...


8

I'd like to first of all debunk the theories of lazy programmers and global shortcuts. Lazy programmers (but not the lazy smart programmers) would not single out keyboard shortcuts as a particular requirement they're too lazy to do. There's nothing hard about setting it up. Most programming languages and frameworks provide functions and convenience ...


7

Our admin [Rahul] said that his contact on the Google Chrome team had told him, "because tests indicated it was necessary". Knowing how much testing happens at Google before changes are rolled out, such a response isn't surprising. However, it's not unheard of them to reverse the decision based on negative real-world feedback. So, it might return in a ...


7

I answered a similar question a while ago, here are some insights from the relevant part of the answer: The big challenge about keyboard shortcuts is to make them learnable and discoverable. The former can be addressed by following conventions and "mnemotechnics", ie. HJKL for navigation, F for "Favorite" and L for "Like" and for the latter I can ...


6

Consider using Ctrl-N. For example, both chrome and explorer use Ctrl-N to open up a new browser window.


6

I wouldn't use the WASD keys for this purpose in this space. Most users will assume, even if an element is selected, that hitting a key will append a character or replace the current selection. And whilst WASD may be used for movement in PC games, that doesn't mean your users will assume the same convention applies to the web, which typically has different ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible