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23

To select one option of a limited number of choices, Radio Button Inputs would be the way to go.


8

Ideally the modal is as tall as need be to contain its contents, but no taller. And that the viewport is taller than the modal. Now, if you're running into situations where you have so much content in the modal that the modal has to be taller than the viewport, then you have two options: let the page or modal scroll rethink using a modal in this ...


7

Yes Regarding sliders/carousels I say most definitely yes. Sliders are Lists of Information A slider (e.g., like slidejs) is really a list, or array, of information elements. In this case the elements usually consist of a full-bleed background image possibly containing a title, some descriptive copy, and possibly a link/call-to-action. The idea is you ...


5

If you make a distinction between a UI designer and a UI/front end developer, I would expect the latter to be competent with scripting to a decent level but the former not necessarily. If you are designing an interface that someone else will eventually implement and your JavaScript knowledge isn't brilliant, you have a responsibility to chat with a more ...


5

I'd consider using some kind of a star, maybe an 8+ point star so that it doesn't look like a some kind of a bonus counter. I've also often seen coins and diamonds or some objects thematically related to the game used as score icons but that may not be possible in your case.


5

This one


5

I find that the + and - signs that have been used in operating systems for a very long time are the easiest to understand. The triangle is a bad choice because it seems to point in the same direction even when rotated (because it has 3 tips). The arrow is okay as long as it is no just a triangle. Its inconvenient is that it draws too much attention. I don't ...


4

You're right, you can't have this happen on rollover on a button. The reason is actually quite simple: you don't wan't the menu to pop each time a user accidentally rolls over the button on her way to a different control. It would be extremely distracting and uncomfortable. So what you do is display the menu after a small delay. But that's the standard ...


4

A few ideas: a paper clipboard image (associated with someone writing down the score), a flip-over scoreboard, an abstract star/hexagon/shield, or a domain-specific reward (coin, treasure, heart, flower, horseshoe, etc.).


4

The question is whether your users need to know that there is a null column. If they do, then you can't ever count on them being "smart enough" to notice that the column is missing and deducing that it must be a null, so you must display it. Then you'll probably need to come up with a custom indication of null, because the third state of a tri-state checkbox ...


4

Don't waste user's time just because the visuals look good. 2 seconds is plenty of time to frustrate the user if it happens every time - and will make the site appear really slow because nothing appears to happen fast. It's important to provide feedback and confirmation of completion - but not to fake it like that. In any case, a lightbox is a distraction ...


4

Iconography is culturally specific, not universal. Which is to say none of these patterns are clear if you aren't familiar with them For an interesting related read, check out this report by Sandia National Laboratory [PDF] regarding iconography that could be used around the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste facility. That said, I'd use the 'hamburger.' It is ...


4

My idea is to present the information about minimum characters required in the autosuggest/autocomplete box. Like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups (the "X characters to go" should only appear after a second of waiting with less that 5 characters typed into the inupt)


4

There is a case for an approach as this (bear with me) in that you are allowing the user to explore and satiate the innate curiosity they have. However, it is never my go-to approach. I dislike hiding information from the user, and even worse distracting them with shallow animations. Content strategy would be the answer in this case. To keep a high level ...


4

Generally, there are just two natural ways to set up a 1-out-of-many choice in HTML: a set of radio buttons, and a select element. The latter can be used with a size attribute specifying the number of options visible in the initial size, or with size defaulted to 1. For usabaility, it is best to have all options visible initially, so that the user can just ...


4

Basically, mousestop would be used the same way as mouseover, but with one major difference. It only triggers if the mouse stops over the element. Or to say it more usefully it does not trigger useless events when the cursor enters the element accidentally because the user is just moving the cursor over the element or scrolling the page under the cursor. The ...


3

It appears that the icon they're referencing with content: "\f002" is intended to be a normal magnifying glass, per the FontAwesome docs: http://fortawesome.github.com/Font-Awesome/#icon/icon-search The FontAwesome site shows a blank spot in the WOFF file that loads:


3

My first question would be how frequently is a user going to want to see classes for multiple states? Maybe that doesn't need to be so large and multi-select but rather a dropdown. I would, however, have state come first (regardless of if it is multi-select) and have the city drop down filter to only show the cities in that state (or those states). This kind ...


3

Even I am in favor with the opinion that triangles are not used consistently and hence have ambiguity of usage and its significance. here is the example of different usage and significance of triangle usage in one website (YouTube). I am not denying the fact that here different widgets are used like drop down box, drop down menus but ultimately it has to ...


3

First of all, I would have removed the hover-state (on mouse over) to display the sub-options, A hover-action is often very sudden and surprising for the user (for smart-phones, there are no real hover - people see and tap) (1) And secondly, Do they need to know what will happen after they click the category? Visual clues are fine, but simplicity is key. ...


3

Definitively if you want to base a decision on the visual side only, you may be be falling short for the right solution. If you want to go the extra mile try this: Load the site with its categories and sections expanded. Then Collapse it after the site finished loading. This allows the user to get a good idea that the categories have content. They might ...


2

How about a tally score type icon:


2

The logic of your screenshot is fine. The layout is awful though :). The Gender dropdown is an especially nice touch :). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Another way to do this is to always have a blank form ready. Then in case the user wants to add another entry he uses the form, and once he presses Save, a new ...


2

I'm not sure your question makes a lot of sense (I'm sorry). UX is platform independant; you can design the UX of a chair, of a TV remote, for a POS terminal, as well as for a website. Even with website design, there are dozens of technologies that can be used to build the interaction of the site. You need to be familiar with the capabilities of the ...


2

Why don't you use compatibility check library like Modernizr http://www.modernizr.com/ Than based on your detection, decide what you load, so that newer browsers get the HTML5 goodies and all the rest get to work with jQuery UI.


2

HTML/CSS is anyway assumed by default for any UI designer, so there is no debate on the need of that. But just having HTML/CSS skills would not really be much of an asset, considering that most web pages nowadays have a whole lot of front end scripting to do also. UI designers, would need some knowledge of JavaScript/Jquery to manipulate the DOM objects, ...


2

Designers should understand the medium they are working in. Web designers, for example, should understand HTML, CSS and JS, and, ideally, how back end systems work. To what extent do they need to understand all of that? Well, it depends. Primarily, it depends on the size of team they may be working on. The larger the UX team, the more dedicated and ...


2

Below are 2 javascript libraries that can mimic your finance graph image. Highcharts - http://www.highcharts.com/stock/demo/ amCharts - http://www.amcharts.com/stock/ There is also an interesting jQuery plugin date range slider called jQRangeSlider - http://ghusse.github.com/jQRangeSlider/stable/demo/, although adding any kind of volume trending to it ...


2

It's a loading screen. It's shown to "entertain" the user when there is nothing else he can do. If showcasing the visuals/information is that important to the user simply then simply don't show it in the loading screen but elsewhere in the app/site.


2

Accordions have a number of problems. The other options tend to scroll out of the viewport if one item is open. Also, the options are never in the same place. And they don't handle multiple levels very well. It's really not that great of a pattern for navigation but it solves two important problems: Space. Accordions are a really compact master-detail ...



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