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8

Ideally the modal is as tall as need be to contain its contents, but no taller. And that the viewport is taller than the modal. Now, if you're running into situations where you have so much content in the modal that the modal has to be taller than the viewport, then you have two options: let the page or modal scroll rethink using a modal in this ...


6

Yes Regarding sliders/carousels I say most definitely yes. Sliders are Lists of Information A slider (e.g., like slidejs) is really a list, or array, of information elements. In this case the elements usually consist of a full-bleed background image possibly containing a title, some descriptive copy, and possibly a link/call-to-action. The idea is you ...


5

I'd consider using some kind of a star, maybe an 8+ point star so that it doesn't look like a some kind of a bonus counter. I've also often seen coins and diamonds or some objects thematically related to the game used as score icons but that may not be possible in your case.


5

If you make a distinction between a UI designer and a UI/front end developer, I would expect the latter to be competent with scripting to a decent level but the former not necessarily. If you are designing an interface that someone else will eventually implement and your JavaScript knowledge isn't brilliant, you have a responsibility to chat with a more ...


5

I find that the + and - signs that have been used in operating systems for a very long time are the easiest to understand. The triangle is a bad choice because it seems to point in the same direction even when rotated (because it has 3 tips). The arrow is okay as long as it is no just a triangle. Its inconvenient is that it draws too much attention. I don't ...


4

You're right, you can't have this happen on rollover on a button. The reason is actually quite simple: you don't wan't the menu to pop each time a user accidentally rolls over the button on her way to a different control. It would be extremely distracting and uncomfortable. So what you do is display the menu after a small delay. But that's the standard ...


4

The question is whether your users need to know that there is a null column. If they do, then you can't ever count on them being "smart enough" to notice that the column is missing and deducing that it must be a null, so you must display it. Then you'll probably need to come up with a custom indication of null, because the third state of a tri-state checkbox ...


4

Iconography is culturally specific, not universal. Which is to say none of these patterns are clear if you aren't familiar with them For an interesting related read, check out this report by Sandia National Laboratory [PDF] regarding iconography that could be used around the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste facility. That said, I'd use the 'hamburger.' It is ...


4

My idea is to present the information about minimum characters required in the autosuggest/autocomplete box. Like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups (the "X characters to go" should only appear after a second of waiting with less that 5 characters typed into the inupt)


3

Don't waste user's time just because the visuals look good. 2 seconds is plenty of time to frustrate the user if it happens every time - and will make the site appear really slow because nothing appears to happen fast. It's important to provide feedback and confirmation of completion - but not to fake it like that. In any case, a lightbox is a distraction ...


3

It appears that the icon they're referencing with content: "\f002" is intended to be a normal magnifying glass, per the FontAwesome docs: http://fortawesome.github.com/Font-Awesome/#icon/icon-search The FontAwesome site shows a blank spot in the WOFF file that loads:


3

My first question would be how frequently is a user going to want to see classes for multiple states? Maybe that doesn't need to be so large and multi-select but rather a dropdown. I would, however, have state come first (regardless of if it is multi-select) and have the city drop down filter to only show the cities in that state (or those states). This kind ...


3

Even I am in favor with the opinion that triangles are not used consistently and hence have ambiguity of usage and its significance. here is the example of different usage and significance of triangle usage in one website (YouTube). I am not denying the fact that here different widgets are used like drop down box, drop down menus but ultimately it has to ...


3

First of all, I would have removed the hover-state (on mouse over) to display the sub-options, A hover-action is often very sudden and surprising for the user (for smart-phones, there are no real hover - people see and tap) (1) And secondly, Do they need to know what will happen after they click the category? Visual clues are fine, but simplicity is key. ...


2

Below are 2 javascript libraries that can mimic your finance graph image. Highcharts - http://www.highcharts.com/stock/demo/ amCharts - http://www.amcharts.com/stock/ There is also an interesting jQuery plugin date range slider called jQRangeSlider - http://ghusse.github.com/jQRangeSlider/stable/demo/, although adding any kind of volume trending to it ...


2

The logic of your screenshot is fine. The layout is awful though :). The Gender dropdown is an especially nice touch :). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Another way to do this is to always have a blank form ready. Then in case the user wants to add another entry he uses the form, and once he presses Save, a new ...


2

I'm not sure your question makes a lot of sense (I'm sorry). UX is platform independant; you can design the UX of a chair, of a TV remote, for a POS terminal, as well as for a website. Even with website design, there are dozens of technologies that can be used to build the interaction of the site. You need to be familiar with the capabilities of the ...


2

Why don't you use compatibility check library like Modernizr http://www.modernizr.com/ Than based on your detection, decide what you load, so that newer browsers get the HTML5 goodies and all the rest get to work with jQuery UI.


2

HTML/CSS is anyway assumed by default for any UI designer, so there is no debate on the need of that. But just having HTML/CSS skills would not really be much of an asset, considering that most web pages nowadays have a whole lot of front end scripting to do also. UI designers, would need some knowledge of JavaScript/Jquery to manipulate the DOM objects, ...


2

Designers should understand the medium they are working in. Web designers, for example, should understand HTML, CSS and JS, and, ideally, how back end systems work. To what extent do they need to understand all of that? Well, it depends. Primarily, it depends on the size of team they may be working on. The larger the UX team, the more dedicated and ...


2

Accordions have a number of problems. The other options tend to scroll out of the viewport if one item is open. Also, the options are never in the same place. And they don't handle multiple levels very well. It's really not that great of a pattern for navigation but it solves two important problems: Space. Accordions are a really compact master-detail ...


2

I wouldn't really worry about the menu itself as much as about the whole concept. I think there is a better way to think about the problem you're trying to solve. What you are trying to achieve is basically to give users more specific categories as they narrow down their navigation. This is a very common pattern in UX. It's called Faceted Navigation (or ...


1

With regards to your concerns: Concern 1: I made use of jquery mobile to do exactly this. I didn't have any issues with the "smoothness" of the gesture on iOS. Concern 2: My personal opinion is that as a user, I want a consistent experience on a device, so when on a desktop I expect certain behaviour from using my mouse and keyboard and similarly when on ...


1

The final goal is to provide the correct product, right? From which you can derive both order and project. Each of those two solutions doesn't allow to directly enter product: user has to remember and fill the whole dependency chain. Why not just filter the data available for autocomplete based on filled values? E.g. user enter the order number, project ...


1

If you're comfortable with Javascript, why not just use a framework like Zurb's Foundation or Twitter's Bootstrap and add some of the interactivity to the otherwise static demo. You can also add some quick UI enhancements with JQueryUI or KendoUI. You might also look at something like Axure. Though it costs a bit of cash, it might be what you're looking ...


1

You can show small preloader near to button or input. For example, you need create todo list, you may made it like this: This solution have several benefits: Preloader does not take up much space. It's not big lightbox which expanded to whole page After-preloader icon display the status of operation, user can see status simply look to this icon ...


1

I think what you are looking for is what Jared Spool calls a "super designer." http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2011/05/31/why-the-valley-wants-designers-that-can-code/ There are quite a few of these types of people out there. They have decent design chops and can code what they design (although, frequently someone else does it). This has the advantage of ...


1

This isn't a situation where you can say "yes, all UI designers should/shoudln't know javascript/jQuery/coding/whatever". And I can't disagree enough with people who insist it can actually be harmful for your designers to know how to do things! Instead of asking "should they know it" you really need to look at your team's needs. Do you need high fidelity ...


1

As per my knowledge UI designer is a person who will only create the design using an image editor or similar method. They do not need to have any technical knowledge. And the web developers (UI related parts will be implemented by front end developers) will do the coding to provide real web pages according to designer's sketch. In this case a UI designer ...


1

Any one who's participating in the frontend development of a site isn't really worth much if they don't know the basic jQuery for manipulating DOM objects, using plugins and doing things like slideshows as you said. Heck a lot of designers are limited if they can't implement the slideshow they've put into a design. HTML/CSS isn't a challenge days, they ...



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