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Write the code such that your build has a flag that switches URLs. Only release your build to yourself.


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Benefits of each option: Keeping the back button: Consistent with other pages in this app Consistent with a very familiar pattern on this platform Consistent behaviour with similar patterns on other interfaces (e.g. the ever-present back button on a browser). From any page, users can get back as far as they want using just one button Removing the back ...


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It seems like a basic, no frills UX that works. The first screen informs the user of their options. When users go into the app they are able to navigate elsewhere easily. It's simple and works well. It also looks as if the opening screen promotes the app. Person X likes it, and next time you login, or a few seconds later, you see that Person Y likes it ...


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Use BrowserStack and test them all. It's the right thing to do. It's a VM environment that you can get for less than the cost of one phone.


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Generally, I would pick the previous (current minus 1) generation ...although the decision will of course depend on the specifics of the app. Reasons: Apple does a lot of testing on the current vs previous generation. So apps that run on the previous generation are likely to also run on the current generation. There is a VERY large tail of users on ...


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How long will development take? Do a SCRUM type approach--you and 3 others come up with the time you think creating the application will take. Average those numbers. Then consider the timeline of new iOS device releases. (IE: Does it happen every 3 years, every 2 years, etc?) What iOS device will be relative when it launches? It will be easier to find the ...


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Very easy: The latest and newest device your budget allows. Technology will always go up and won't downgrade, so the older version you get, the less it will last. Another option is an iPod Touch + an iPad so you can cover a wider range of screens for around the same cost of a phone. But of course, you won't be able to use anything related to phone, so take ...


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To give you some arguments: There is this thing that a users thumb is often only half the size of their phones screen. Depending on the way they hold it, it can be hard to reach the top navigation. For that reason your solution will be better. A popular way of hiding a lot of links to a lot of different pages is the drawer menu, hamburger menu or off ...


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Quick critique: Feature-richness vs ergonomic minimalism is a key tradeoff here. You want the remote to be fully featured, but to be simple enough to use that it's not intimidating. That is a balance that most remotes do NOT get right. Circular shapes are problematic here. I understand why you would use circular shapes because they are 'friendly'. But ...


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I agree with the comments mentioning the need to capture frequently used browser functionality but given the controls shown in your mock-up (7-8 items) I think a possible solution could focus on the following: 1. Grouping controls in one location: By doing so you can remove clutter, preserve some room to scale-up if you need to include additional ...


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I'm a big fan of QR codes, but like many raw technologies when they emerged (the web, pagers, email) there is a process of socialization, awareness and productization that is still underway before they can be properly used. Unfortunately by nature this isn't something that can be fixed with an app (or purely with a UX approach). But, it IS something that ...



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