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15

Less an answer and more a word of caution: Be careful not to let your personal experience and preference cloud your judgment for what's best for the actual users of your products and devices. Which orientation helps them get shit done? Prefer that. I find it a little concerning that the first few answers are all: "I like portrait better. I like landscape ...


13

Check out Jakon Nielsen's thoughts on the issue. The video linked at the bottom is only 3 minutes long and is interesting, if not directly useful. General thoughts (no facts to back this up other than personal experience): If you need to fall back to a design for another platform, fall back to PC designs, NOT iPod designs. If you can get your hands on an ...


13

There is no hover equivalent on iOS devices. The most conventional gesture to interact with content is 'tap'. You could have the content boxes open a pop-up or overlay on tap (which would work better on iPad than iPhone). Using other gestures which have no strong established convention could just confuse users. But it might just be more graceful and usable ...


8

Apple's iOS guidelines say to "Think twice before hiding the status bar if your app is not a game or full-screen media-viewing app." I think their attitude is that if you don't really need the extra space, leave the status bar visible so people can see the time and battery life. Also, from same link above, "don't create a custom status bar."


7

This applies more to your general UI question: Think "touch, don't click." How would you (or your potential clients) use the app with their hands? There is a fundamental difference between pointing at something with a mouse and pointing at something with your hand. Perhaps make the most important controls on the side so people can reach them easily? ...


7

If you can provide a better experience on a different kind of device, do it! Things to consider: Don't make a page for iPads specifically but for tablets in general (touch and medium screen size optimized) Don't confuse your desktop users - it shouldn't be completely different from your standard website Always provide the option to switch to your standard ...


7

The only way I know to truly simulate an iOS device is to register as an apple developer and download the iOS SDK. It comes with an iOS simulator that will faithfully simulate both the iPhone and the iPad. You will of course also need a machine running OS X, as the SDK cannot be installed on a windows machine.


7

First, I think it's about how people think about their workflow. It's an emphasis on "how" instead of "where": http://www.malcolmgroves.com/blog/?p=633 Windows has been promoting the doc-centric view of the world for a long time. I remember that being one of the supposed big advantages of Windows 95, the ability to focus on your documents and not the ...


7

Let's take a step back and look at your business model. Should you even include ads in your app in the first place? Are they likely to be successful? For advertising, context is everything. In general, ads are most effective when the user has what is called "commercial intent", meaning they are looking to make a purchase. The next most effective ad is when ...


7

You can use a menu with options / information, with two interaction options: Option 1 (I consider this one more intuitive). Tap -> Opens the menu Double Tap -> Uses the item directly Tap option in menu / Tap close button -> Close the menu / Close the menu and perform the action. Option 2 (This one could work with power users). Drag -> Open the menu ...


6

I think Apple puts a lot of pressure to making their touch-based screen devices as accessible as possible. As far as I am concerned, iOS has pretty good set of accessibility features including voiceover, support for aiding hardware and so on. ATMac, website dedicated to disabled people using Apple products, once published a pretty good round-up of assistive ...


6

Well, you're not really having a UITabBar problem. It's a classic navigation design problem: what do I do with overflow when I have more items than fit in the available space? The answer to this question can be politically contentious! Because ideally what you want to recognise is that the immediately visible navigation items are going to be just that: ...


6

Apple's says (CHAPTER 5 -User Experience Guidelines): "As a general rule, transition individual views and objects, not the screen. In most cases, flipping the entire screen is not recommended. When you perform fewer full-screen transitions, your iPad app has greater visual stability, which helps people keep track of where they are in their task. You can use ...


6

Maintaining your current design... As mentioned there isn't a hover behaviour equivalent on iOS devices. Even if you implemented a 'follow the finger' behaviour, most users will probably be moving their finger off the screen, moving to the target and then touching the screen again. One approach would be to have small page curls in the bottom corners. This ...


6

There is good Question from before around general iPad design: Are there any good resources about designing touch screen interfaces? Design Considerations These are really high-level and do not touch on UI design in particular. Staff/Employees - Since it is an iPad kiosk I assume there will be people there. Employees are key to any business and this ...


6

First off, I'm not sure why you think that replacing an iOS switch with a check-box will free up a "significant amount of space" and what "better use" you could have for it because a switch is at most 3-times as wide as a checkbox. Secondly, iOS Human Interface Guidelines are very clear on the use of controls. They say people should interact in "gestures, ...


6

If you have a lot of skills/items you can have a help circle in a specific place in your UI that will be a target place for DRAGGING items to see the help / tooltip. Touch the potion Drag it to the help circle on the bottom right of your UI and release it there The help tooltip appear


6

I think you'd be surprised how smart users are, most of them are able to quickly distinguish native controls from web controls. That being said, as long as you don't deliberately try to make your controls look like part of the browser you should be ok (this is an anti-pattern that malware often uses to imitate system controls). In the Facebook and BBC ...


5

In most photo apps I know there the tap+hold or longtap event that triggers some sort of contextual menu with further options like export, mail to someone, etc. Look at mobile safari for instance. Tap and hold on a link and an action sheet with some actions appears. This is used widely in apples apps. You can see that in safari on the "+" icon (favorite), in ...


5

Ads on mobile apps sucks, and badly. Not only because you don't want user to accidently tap them (as @DA01 rightly said) and take them out of your app, but also it affects the performance. Having said that, You can try these two ad placement ideas 1) Show the ad when you are navigating or showing loading screen before showing a new content. 2) If your ...


4

The iPad screen is 1024-by-768 so to view images at 200% zoom with no pixelation you are going to need an image that's 2048 x 1546. Possible solutions: Find or write an image viewer that does interpolation between the pixels for the higher zoom values. The images won't be pixelated, but it will be blurred. Increase the compression of the images. This will ...


4

A good reference for this is on Safari's site. It goes on to say that: "The mantra for cross-device development is: one site for all is the ideal but it's not always possible. Whichever strategy you adopt, there is one vital point to remember: Mobile users are task-focused users. And so are all users Many developers and usability pundits advocate making ...


4

It's ok, as long as the element being resized is clearly marked as selected. If this takes place on a screen where you can zoom in and out, then you need to make sure that the user always knows what will be affected by his actions - the element or the screen. And this can't be done by the location of the fingers alone - you need to provide an explicit ...


4

What's wrong with doing all 3 ?! I am strong fan of appealing to different kinds of intuitions when guiding people.


4

Use a semi transparant overlay, similar to a modal screen. See attached. Though you'll probably need to modify the layout...


4

There seems to be an established standard for no border with iOS app icons. I see no reason to break this convention with your current design. The no border icon you posted even looks a lot better than the border one (although I do like the border on your logo).


4

The clues to the answer lie in the wording of the question. Should I allow...should I constrain it. i.e. You are asking if you should restrict the user activities. Typically users have an expectation of interaction with a map via familiarity with other applications. They expect to be able to pan and zoom. Often this functionality comes free with a map ...


4

I would suggest not - many cases for the iPad hold it elevated in landscape, so a user with the screen raised would not be able to use your calculator. I can't provide figures, but would suggest that looking at the most popular calculator apps should give you some indication about which designs are succeeding and failing on the app store.


4

I suggest you should use 'select+drag' approach instead. This is similar to 'double-tap-drag' described by PhonicUK but doesn't require immediate drag. User selects an item first by tapping it once, the item is then highlighted and ready for a drag operation. Other items won't accept drag until they are selected so scrolling is still available. I think ...



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