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Assuming you are making an app for an iPhone, I would not have a keyboard short cut for edit, this adds in unnecessary steps as the keyboard is generally hidden inside an app so you are asking your user to bring up the keyboard and press key combinations. Whereas the edit button on the app is just one tap and is quick enough as it is. If you are making an ...


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Take a look at what your users want to get at. If you are breaking these down by category and it's a simpel iOS app, then consider doing a card sorting similar to passbook. Even iTunes and the Newsstand offer a much more streamlined approach over the cover flow. If users are sorting out available cards in a various category, it would be better to ...


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The cover flow responds well to hardly any real use case. Sure, it's visually nice effect to browse the items, but when designing for reality, there is no such use case as "a user browses the content." They are always making decisions on some criteria, whether actively or subconsciously. You could start by getting to the root of the user's decision making ...


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You have three options here (listed in order of growing complexity & amount of functionality): Top navigation in the header/breadcrumbs works fine for monofunctional app with two-level navigation. Bottom menu for cases with 3-5 main functions or pages Sidebar that slides from the left on tap by the hamburger icon. For complex apps with many ...


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I wouldn't opt for any of presented options. Two latter fall out of question, because CTA is too far and detached from the action it submits. First option has a doubled CTA, and doubling essential controls confuses users. There is also no need to show "Next": users know when it comes to confirmation, it's a sequence, a wizard of a sort. You cannot jump ...


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The first one is the best option: easy to reach and the colour makes it very easy to see where the 'save' options are. Option 2 is okay - but someone not as familiar with iOS may not see the button straight away as it isn't quite as obvious as the blocks of blue. Third one is a big no no for me - will take the user too long to find the button/if they can ...


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I strongly recommend that you put the T&C first, followed by the Facebook agreement, followed by the account creation. This is the most logical flow because the end user will want to know there rights above anything, and know how their personal information will be handled, with creating an account being the least important step.


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I think this is somewhat debatable. if they are agreeing to your Facebook sign in and you get the permissions, what happens if they decline the t&c? I would question if in this case and t&c should be the first thing that is shown to the user followed by account creation/facebook permission request. I would also like to know in what way you're ...


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I think i would say the obvious: the common patter for that now is [] I agree to the {Company Name} Terms and Conditions [] I accept the terms and conditions. where [] is a checkbox.


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The best option for T&C is use a check box with the link to TC, only when the check box is selected you can go to the next step. Another alternative is to show the T&C and have the Agree or Not agree with the display.


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First of all, items that are being downloaded now should not be clickable/available for launch/viewing. This temporal unavailability should be signified by item's content (title, caption, image etc) and background greyed-out and the cursor that doesn't change when hovering this item. Second, there should be a progress bar displayed. This is how Adobe is ...


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Depending on how many feed there are to be chosen from, you could also insert the settings link below the feeds in a separated area (maybe your customer also wants to display terms of use or other "not important" information.) SELECT FEED - Feed 1 - Feed 2 - Feed 3 etc. - MORE - Settings Just a thought, maybe it helps.


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For Android it's probably best to place a settings item within a 3-dot menu in the top right corner. However for iOS it's much more fair game. You could have a slide out right hand side menu with secondary links such as settings.


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The Settings should be in the header. Look at the Google Material design structure as a reference. A 3-dot menu doesn't take up too much space.


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Instagram's App, at least for smartphones (not tablets), has a kind of wizard style get forward to complete your new Instagram picture process. See https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.instagram.android


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The 10 Usability Heuristics are as close to a 'Bible' as you can get. Visibility of system status: The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time. and Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors: Error messages should be expressed in plain language (no codes), ...


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Yes, it's a normal practice. As you mention with an activity indicator and the option to cancel it'd be okay. A reason for this is because if something goes wrong you want to communicate it to the user as the first step after the "Submit" action. If you introduce more actions "in the middle" of that process, and that action can also have errors, it'll broke ...


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Yes, you want an activity indicator. Your typical user won't know what's going on behind the scenes and may assume that it froze if there isn't an activity indicator of some kind.


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How I will handle that is making the puzzle follow your finger... and add buttons at the bottom and a indicator in the bottom center



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