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1

In order to answer your own question, ask yourself how this UI works and dig deeper into what's being communicated to the user. What does each row do? The rows' function(s) should dictate their appearance. Are they clickable? Do they do something in the same page or link elsewhere? If they are clickable and navigate to a new page, you might want to ...


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Well it looks like all your important information is available in a clear manner to the user. As for making it less "dull," you could consider using different colors for the text and background. But I don't think there is a problem.


2

Like with most questions like this, the tl;dr is: It depends. The correct navigational pattern is largely contingent upon three things: App structure (IA) Leaf page functionality (IxD) Desire to enforce prioritization by the product team (Organizational) App structure If your app is structured such that you can support fewer than 5 first-tier leaf ...


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You have already highlighted the core functionality of tab navigation and off canvas menu. The only drawback I could think of with such design is the screen estate available for the actual content. However mobile phones are getting bigger so I don't think this would be an issue in the future. Whether to implement off-canvas or tab navigation or both ...


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The convention on iOS seems to be that if a field is editable, it'll have a disclosure arrow ( > ), and tapping that field slides in a new view where you can enter a new value or select from a list of options (for example, see Settings > General > About). You've already used a disclosure arrow in the Guests section, so I'd suggest just being consistent and ...


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You could do the mobile version of amazons 1click ordering, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1-Click) In your case would be interesting if it were a 1 swipe checkout. this will be only for returning customers as their previous purchase info like payment and delivery will be used


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I made a comment about precentages. you could attempt to do something similar to this: do NOT make this design. it has many flaws and should not be replicated on a real app, its just to show how big UI elements that take up a fixed range on the screen can look good


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I agree with the commenter who suggested making the buttons a percentage of the screen width, rather than a fixed size. You could also put the app in the middle of the screen and have some whitespace around it. Quite a few iOS apps do that. I wouldn't centre the layout, as it makes it harder for the eye to follow.


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If there is a Done button on the right top corner and the header is sticky (always visible) then that is enough to tell/indicate the user that changes will be saved only on clicking the Done button. Also, if the user uses back button of the phone then you can show a modal-box to check if user wants to save their changes or not (just to be on safe side). If ...



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