Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

This obviously depends a lot on the game itself. Think of the pace of the game. How fast do players need to locate and use the controls? If speed and skill is part of the gameplay it is better to have the controls designed and positioned to be used often and fast, and not having too much of them. Sometimes a game’s complexity is the game itself. A strategy ...


3

The best approach I could think of to make the button stand out is after the in-app purchase, once the page redirects back to this home page have the button do a quick bounce effect as if it were just placed there and have the button be a color that contrasts its surrounds and other buttons, but not wildly different like a bright red. Just use the secondary ...


0

Repeated elements can be clustered with another structure. Let's say you have: Archers, Spear-man, Swordsman and Catapult You can first select - a group of unit - decide on the ratio between base/bunker with the amount of resources. If you have visual cue for each group of soldier on your screen; you do not need four sliders at all. Of course, the new ...


2

To require user account before use of a new and possibly unknown application may be a bad choice. Instead of two levels of users (free and premium) you may need a third level. This should be the one where users can try the application without signing up so they know if it’s worth the effort to sign up. Experienced user already have numerous of dead accounts ...


0

I am more familiar with option 2 design. The quantity in option 1 is quite overwhelming and the button 'done' seems bit out of place(it took few more seconds to figure out). If one opts for input field, bringing in 'update cart' button will be necessary. Which is missing from both options.


0

You can use the swipe left or right option to have reorder list option and if you already have the swipe reserved for some other options then you can use it in same side as I showed in the attached image. If the user wants to reorder the list up by one or two steps then they can easily move it by taping the arrow up or down otherwise they can enter the value ...


1

A year ago when i was designing an application for time registration and planning, I designed and tested 24 hour selection widget like in below. Instead of select all, deselect all, creating patterns related to the context (day shift, night shift and holiday) worked quite well. After you select a template, you can change each boxes like toggle button - on ...


0

2 things come to mind when I read your scenario: Your users need to know: Why do I need to enter date frequently? (Implication) Your users need to know: How do I know I need to enter data? (means) Implication: If you design your app in a way where your user will know what the benefit to entering data is, they are probably more likely to do it. As for ...


1

It seems, the conceptual model you provide isn't aligned with user's mental model. Let's step back from UI to UX. There are research which recommend clear time limitations for parents: Pediatricians: No More than 2 Hours Screen Time Daily for Kids Children should have two-hour limits on the time spent in front of screens Parents also aware of the ...


0

If the entry is simply yes or no , Would it be better to show something like this ( e.g. food diary ) Did you have breakfast? slide to enter data or ignore if you didn't. You can say it in a more descriptive words but I hop the idea is clear. if you have two choices and one of them will make no changes, then don't ask the user to do extra work


1

I agree with Andrew Martin above. The most important (or primary actions) should top the list. The other actions should follow. And the least favourable option should be place at the bottom. I believe this is even further exaggerated in the bottom example, where there is a noticable 'gap' between the primary action(s) and cancel. :)


1

Looking at the two examples given, I'm fairly certain that the top option in each list is the one deemed most useful in the given situation. The first example asks the user to sign in so the first button offers exactly that while the cancel option is the least likely action and so is bottom of the list. In the second example the user is being informed of a ...


2

According to the latest human interface guideline, for an action sheet (as given by you), the cancel button should be at the bottom so as to encourage users to read through all the alternatives before making a choice. For an alert box: When the most likely button performs a nondestructive action, it should be on the right in a two-button alert. The ...


1

As you've discovered, the iOS Human Interface Guidelines document (or HIG) makes no mention of an accordion, however they do refer to the UITableView. This StackOverflow question gets the credit for that. There are also other accordion solutions, such as this one on YouTube. But I think your question isn't "How do I do this" but "Is it OK to do this?" That ...


0

c) Just log them into their existing account with no error message. (I just tried it and confirmed this is what StackExchange does.) Serving an error message and making the user navigate to the login page and retype their credentials is a poor experience. Once the user is logged in, it will be clear that they didn't need to sign up as they already had an ...


0

This flow can go into three screens: group list, group view with group metadata and a sub-groups list, sub-group view with metadata and a feed of content. A material design plus icon can store all additional functionality like editing, exporting etc, or if there's only editing, use the edit icon in the same place for editing the group description, image, ...


0

Remember that consistency across platforms is an internal company benefit--not an end-user benefit, as few end users walk around using both iOS and Android (and those that do are obviously already well versed in both so it's not a big deal to be consistent). You may have a very good internal business reason to keep the consistent, though (ease of ...


1

I did a small User Testing with your icons. Chose 5 tech-savvy almost college aged kids who stay nearby and showed them the icons with the labels hidden. This is what they had to say This is the distribution for each icon Music-3 Songs-2 Movies-1 Videos-4 Search-all 5 More-all 5 But, the TV icon was ambiguous TV-3? Screen-1? Track pad-1? ...


0

I think this discussion is very interesting. On the ux podcast by Per Axbom and James Royal-Lawson I heard they talk about the "hamburger menus" used on mobile devices and how often this icon is pressed depending on if the button had the label "menu" next to it or not. I googled it and came across this related article. http://exisweb.net/menu-eats-hamburger ...



Top 50 recent answers are included