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3

The best approach I could think of to make the button stand out is after the in-app purchase, once the page redirects back to this home page have the button do a quick bounce effect as if it were just placed there and have the button be a color that contrasts its surrounds and other buttons, but not wildly different like a bright red. Just use the secondary ...


2

To require user account before use of a new and possibly unknown application may be a bad choice. Instead of two levels of users (free and premium) you may need a third level. This should be the one where users can try the application without signing up so they know if it’s worth the effort to sign up. Experienced user already have numerous of dead accounts ...


2

According to the latest human interface guideline, for an action sheet (as given by you), the cancel button should be at the bottom so as to encourage users to read through all the alternatives before making a choice. For an alert box: When the most likely button performs a nondestructive action, it should be on the right in a two-button alert. The ...


1

As you've discovered, the iOS Human Interface Guidelines document (or HIG) makes no mention of an accordion, however they do refer to the UITableView. This StackOverflow question gets the credit for that. There are also other accordion solutions, such as this one on YouTube. But I think your question isn't "How do I do this" but "Is it OK to do this?" That ...


1

A year ago when i was designing an application for time registration and planning, I designed and tested 24 hour selection widget like in below. Instead of select all, deselect all, creating patterns related to the context (day shift, night shift and holiday) worked quite well. After you select a template, you can change each boxes like toggle button - on ...


1

It seems, the conceptual model you provide isn't aligned with user's mental model. Let's step back from UI to UX. There are research which recommend clear time limitations for parents: Pediatricians: No More than 2 Hours Screen Time Daily for Kids Children should have two-hour limits on the time spent in front of screens Parents also aware of the ...


1

I agree with Andrew Martin above. The most important (or primary actions) should top the list. The other actions should follow. And the least favourable option should be place at the bottom. I believe this is even further exaggerated in the bottom example, where there is a noticable 'gap' between the primary action(s) and cancel. :)


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Looking at the two examples given, I'm fairly certain that the top option in each list is the one deemed most useful in the given situation. The first example asks the user to sign in so the first button offers exactly that while the cancel option is the least likely action and so is bottom of the list. In the second example the user is being informed of a ...



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