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16

Acceptable? Yes, you can have no music, or maybe some generic noisy background if you want to add something to the full audiovisual experience. Now, unless you're really short on budget, I'd recommend you to use music for your app. The more original and in tune with your game, the better. Not only because you're creating a full sensorial experience, but ...


4

I have my phone on silent 90% of the time and a lot of people I know are the same way so background music isn't much of an issue for me. But I think its still better to give that as an option because plenty of people do listen to in game music, you should make sure of at least these things, The length of the soundtrack. How long do you expect an average ...


1

A soundtrack, when well done, tends to enhance any immersive media (film, TV, games, etc.) But from a UX perspective, be sure to add an option to turn it off. And, it's certainly acceptable to not have a soundtrack.


1

An alternative concept you could test: make it a two-step-process. Tapping on a line both plays the sound and activates the line (e.g. check mark at the left), and on the bottom you'll have a button saying "Send sound to Kyle". In this way, you account for the fact that the user probably will send the sound that he last previewed, and the send-action is ...


1

The position of the button depends on the use case and whether or not your toolbar is a global bar or specific to the current view of the app. The left side of the toolbar is typically reserved for actions associated with the current view of the app. In the use case you provided the toolbar is custom to this view of the app (only appears during profile ...


1

iOS doesn't have a default radio button. You can either use a third-party plugin to create a custom radio button like this or you can use iOS other default elements: a picker a switch


1

Usually this is done using a table view, which is basically a list of items as well, only with a checkmark instead of a radio button. Sometimes such lists are on a new 'page' in the navigation structure. How this fits in your navigational structure depends on the context.


1

None. Assistive Touch is built so users can drag it to wherever they like on the screen to not interfere with any app. Even if you chose to make your app "support" it, that change would also cause anyone else using the app without assistive touch to suffer. It's not a function that Apple allows you to scan whether it's active or not. Just don't do it.


1

Forget the "platform wars" and make the application user friendly from a touch perspective. The most important aspect you must try to achieve is to deliver a seamless experience across multiple platforms (make your app look and feel the same as much as you can on all platforms). As I see your application is not a very complicated so that shouldn't be so ...


1

You need to take in consideration the context of the UX. Is this app intended to be used frequently? What age range the average user will be? Whats the final purpose of the app? Icons can be good if there are few elements on your menu. If you have 10+ choices it might not be a good idea to include icons at all, it will be hard to read and will feel ...


1

Before you settle on a "Home" call to action review your task flows. If you are more than 2 levels deep and can't "cancel" or "back" out to the home screen you may have too deep a hierarchy. Try and do what you can to flatten so that you can utilize "back" or "cancel". "Home" is a non-standard action in mobile. This is a good opportunity for you to dig a ...



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