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35

Yes, it's bad design for its lack of signifiers (signs in the world that offer guidance). You can't distinguish what device it belongs to by just looking at it. You can't know its purpose without trying it out. It does't show its state clearly. Could we establish a clear relationship between one state and one temperature easily and consistently? I don't ...


17

Wikipedia seems to be popular with the information so far... :) So here's info from the history section of the page on caps lock The Caps Lock key is a modified version of the Shift lock key that occupies the same position on the keyboards of mechanical typewriters. An early innovation in mechanical typewriters was the introduction of a second ...


16

Yes, Use of grey scale for depicting temperature is not at all a good idea. The photograph shows clearly the change in intensity as the knob moves from white to grey. But it doesn't communicate the purpose of intensity, specially knowing that this knob is for adjusting the temperature, I think they got it all wrong. A simple color depiction would have ...


5

Combining the answer by @pzw and the original knop, referring a bit to @AntonioMarquis : we don't have to mix the colors to get the idea of 'temparature' across. These knobs might, indeed, be hiding in dark places, so let's keep a fair amount of contrast in the graphics. Just adding some (solid) color would do the trick. I also chose light blue instead of ...


4

It may be related to QWERTZ keyboard layouts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QWERTZ And you probably see it on most keyboards because you live/work in a country (Germany, Austria, etal) that uses the QWERTZ keyboard layout. See the orange countries in this pic. ...


4

The reason for this is that you most likely are more familiar with left-to-right (LTR) languages, so your engrained progress is moving from the left to the right. People who are more familiar with right-to-left (RTL) languages such as Arabic or Hebrew, are likely to see a progression from the right to left as moving forward. You can see this in common ...


3

Interesting question. It depends on the maturity of your users. The scrollbar is good option to give your users a hint about the amount of content that is remaining to be viewed. By the size of the scroller handle. Showing it persistently need not be the case. As the user is interested in the content. This can appear when the user is swiping from left to ...


3

Question: should login/signup appear before or after the navbar? (question clarified by OP) In short: If it's in that top right corner, then it doesn't matter very much. Here's why: Top-right consoles are rarely perceived by users, because the F-Pattern shows that users rarely scan that corner unless they are specifically looking for something. ...


3

While it is probably not overly relevant, on a mechanical typewriter the shift lock key tilts slightly down and in direction of the typist to lock. Given its small size (it is smaller than the regular shift key) and the considerable mechanical force one has to employ with one's pinky (and the typical pinky inclination one row above the usual shift row), one ...


2

How about combining Total and Sum as a single field? Like this download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The input field for the selected item gets enabled. The other option is disabled. You'll probably need to come up with a better label than "totalling method" though.


2

Hope that you already are familiar with Don Norman. I think your question/topic is closely related to Normans Gulf of Evaluation and Gulf of Execution. We always want narrow gulfs in UI. To accomplish that, we can work with Normans design principles. I think it all comes down to making UI's that has as low required mental model for the user as possible. ...


2

As others have mentioned, the downward arrow seems to be a particularity of German and Austrian QWERTZ keyboards. There is a standard for depicting the function keys on a keyboard, part of ISO/IEC 9995. You'll see there are two possible symbols for Caps Lock, both of which point upward. The standard considers the different types of Shift and Caps lock ...


2

This type of form interaction has been coined by web forms guru Luke W. as "selection-dependent inputs". He talks about it here: http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?764 and http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2007/02/selection-dependent-inputs.php The biggest issue with this interaction style is that it can disorientate the user, if it is not done properly. ...


2

I would use the word clone. I am a developer and that is the word we use. In many development languages that is exactly what clone means. If it was just temporary the term developers would use the term impersonate. For lack of something better I would use the technical term. Please see the comments. The OP asked be to add that as an answer.


2

I don't see any common use case to show both the inches and millimeters at the same time, while showing them at the same time may cause confusion. Visuals such as colour aside, I would keep the switch and the question, but only show the "Size in inches" if the switch shows inches, and similarly for millimeters. As an aside, I would use "inches" not "IN" on ...


2

On a login page, what is the order for most important fields for all the users? (Irrespective of whether they want to stay logged in or not) I think most of us would have it this way: Username/email Password Login button Keep me logged in option Now going by this order, it won't make a good UX (or even pratically possible) to have a 'Keep me logged in' ...


2

This is a "it depends on the complexity" type of question. At the end of the day, you want to dedicate just enough real estate for your persistent navigation that is easy for your users to understand. Any more will take away space from your primary content, any less will be too confusing to use. For a site with a relatively simple navigational structure ...


1

I think the faded item will clearly say "there's more stuff over here", and the way you get to items partially off the screen is, by standard, the swipe. The scrollbar would be useful to show how many items are off-screen (one screenful? a dozen?) and where you are in the horizontal list, but that's clearly a secondary need.


1

If I was a user and had that layout in front of me, I would try to swipe using the images first, and if that failed I would try to use the scroll bar to scroll along. I do, however, consider myself an advanced user of technology. Having both options will let more advanced users or those who use touch devices primarily use the swipe action, and the scroll ...


1

It could be a good design. A lot of times users would think an A/C temperature needed to be a specific number. The truth is that the A/C should be set to something comfortable. In an office environment this leads to people "fighting" over the A/C setting. It also leads people to set the setting when they are not supposed to. For example setting a dial to ...


1

Why not look at it from another POV. Why do we need a checkbox "Keep me signed in" at the first place? It does nothing more than just toggle a setting right? Why not add 2 confirmation buttons? One with the text "Login and never ask again" and one with "Login and please nag me again next time" (maybe do something on the labels??) Clicking the first button ...


1

"Cascading dependencies" between user interface components.


1

I can think of two ways Search for the right word : "Match" Provide a warning/note : Stay with "Copy" but put a warning message explaining that existing permission would be deleted and selected user's permission would be copied.


1

I think 'import' or 'transfer' are the best terms to describe this, because you are essentially transferring data from one source to another, and 'importing' the new settings to the user.


1

Long-press is akin to a context menu and is predominantly used in Android. In iOS I have only seen Long Press in WhatsApp. Its good as one gets more real estate on top of existing ones. But yes it is not very intuitive and needs a bit of discovery. But I guess a little bit of discovery and learn-ability is inevitable. Also Long-press is more heavy on ...


1

A system design presents two aspects, the controls user needs to operate in order make the device or system function and the the domain user is operating in. The paper Domain Models for User Interface Design by David Benyon compares different valid techniques for designing the model, but clearly concludes The objects which users think about and ...



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