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15

I find just using the colors as the demarkation a bit harder to understand. You can use a vertical rule to act as a placeholder for the goal, YTD or annual, depending on the day. Your focus should be the goal and how much over or under you are. What I mean is there is not enough value of showing the actual numbers when you are just bother to about the ...


11

I had a very similar problem recently, and did some user testing on it. The main thing that came out of it was that we should avoid colours that have a common meaning. So yellow was a bad option, and green represented 'good', not 'acceptable'. In the end we used grey as the neutral background colour, blue as the progress for 'expectation'; green as ...


11

The main issue is not with colors, although JohnGB has some valid points on this. i would go with something like this in order to avoid the confusion with colors.


10

They can be quite different. Off the top of my head: Intranet users can use certain information elements a lot - and will want to be able to 'sort' the interface so they can quickly get at the bits they use regularly Intranets can be vast & also dumping grounds for data which people will add - but then never get around to removing when its out of ...


7

I've encountered this issue many times across a couple of different places I've worked. Different people know the icon but refer to it differently. They may know the name but never refer to it in such a manner. The one time I saw true uniformity across all departments was that it was given a specific name like "The Hub" or as Cape Cod Gunny answered, "The ...


6

In my experience in larger organizations, the absolute ideal user interface for your intranet would be this: What are you looking for? [search term ] GO >> The reasons for this are many: most intranet use is hunting for one bit of information and then getting out intranets tend to be highly fragmented spaces and ...


5

I've been amazed to find that most of my intranet users are practically unaware that they're on a website or perhaps what that really means. My sample is of entirely non-technical users, unsurprisingly. In our case they accessed the application exclusively via a desktop icon we installed for them, so in a way it did function very much like a program. As a ...


4

One of the biggest problems with companies these days is the tendency to give things grand titles that no one remembers. How many companies have a project Zeus or other projects known only by a three letter acronym? These titles are there to glorify those who do the work, not to explain it to others. Intranet is a technical term. Xweb is a glorification ...


4

The less questions you ask, the better. For personas development one should use interviews of the *ethnographic * kind (Google for it). In these interviews the subject is encouraged to talk freely, unconstrained. This is the best way to detect their cravings and frustrations. On the other hand, a set of preset questions implies a frame in the interviewer's ...


4

This isn't always easy and you will most likely have to adapt whatever practice you decide on to fit your specific situation. If you're unable to observe people, or you're experimenting to learn about how to capture the right information, surveys can help you gain an initial understanding. The biggest problem with asking people why they do something is ...


4

There is absolutely no difference in usability testing an intranet site from a public web site. The questions are the same and the conventions are exactly the same on public web sites and intranet. The big difference is the target audience, which on an intranet are this group of people, instead of 30 year old males or women wanting to buy red shoes. The ...


4

I'm guessing this question will be locked, because it's a "shopping around" type question, but have a look at what Atlassian does. Their products are top notch. Intranets have fragmented anyways. So many companies focus on such tiny niches, that it's hard to compete with them by building a very general application that does it all. So again, look at any ...


3

There is a violation of consistency I think. There are controls with the same names( e.g. Home) that take users to different places in the ui and outcomes of controls (e.g. Search) are different. I am wondering if just showing one control (e.g < Organization x) to get back to the global app could work in your situation. If you are going to show another ...


3

My first question would be - why do you want to give the users a welcome page? Is it to give them context or some introduction/guidance/help? On that assumption how about the following: Design the first page after they have logged in to be the summary view of open and/or past tickets. But - the first time they log in or if there are no tickets have the ...


3

If you are looking to introduce a bias towards giving up, that's one way to do it. If you want to learn when people give up, give them tasks they can succeed at, but are difficult. Some people will have a harder time with the tasks than others, some will be very persistent, others will give up easily. It's highly individual. Success rate is an important ...


3

Default answer is probably to ignore it. If the user has the correct mental model for not logging in they'll not be confused by not logging out. Best answer is to do some quick research and find out if your users have that mental model. If they don't, find out what they are thinking and design your solution to help move their understanding to match the ...


3

You should allow the user to use standard practices to go back : Pressing Esc key should take the user Cancel/Close. Have a Back - icon followed by the context where it would go to. Have a CLOSE icon which closes the modal without change of State. Similar to #1. Clicking outside the modal should take the user back. Hitting the back button on the browser ...


3

I think this is a case where user research would be of valuable information where you should actually have a discussion with the different user groups and see what is the exact information are they looking for and what the cases where they want to dig down to the granularity of data. I have in my experience generally found that users usually want access to ...


2

can I answer my own question? • Pay special attention to the intranet homepage; it is essential to attracting users and communicating information • We need to gain a detailed understanding of internal workflows and processes so that we can presenting standard intranet information, including policies, forms, and procedures, much more-so than a standard ...


2

One of the big UX differences is that a public website has to sell the company, because it is the public face of the organisation. This means that it is often bright, loads of images, it is a publicity tool. And intranet is a tool for employees to use. You are not selling, so you don't need to focus so much on the look and style of the site in corporate ...


2

It is good to have a Users summary page with total number of tickets pending, resolved and with a create / search box with the same page. So that user will not lost or reduce redundancy in creating duplicate ticket and status on the already created ticket.


2

You don't say what kind of initiative it is, whether an add-on to an existing platform or something entirely new, but you will encounter complexity, so I would recommend a prototyping approach to learn about your users' needs as you progress. Similarly, you can develop your questions at each stage of the process as you learn more and your needs change. It ...


2

Observing (even a couple of) users or having them walk you through their tasks is really valuable. You seem to be aware of it but it cannot be stressed enough. You wrote that “interviewing the user is hard” but what does hard mean in this context? It still might be worthwhile to push for some access. You will need to talk to real users for the usability ...


2

Back in '97-98 I helped a major management consulting firm launch their first intranet. We did a lot of stuff wrong, but one thing we got right was the company directory. Each employee entry included a picture, phone number, email address, office location and area of expertise. We also allowed employees to edit their own profiles. Regarding your situation ...


2

I agree that intranet, especially given the vagaries of English and its inevitable confusion with Internet, should be avoided. The site my former company, a non-profit, used for this purpose (expense claims, logging hours for contractors, communications, etc) was called backoffice. It's easily-understood by non-techies, you can create a subdomain with that ...


2

As a SharePoint consultant (a biased one) you can always take a look at public facing web sites which will give you an idea what's possible. The only thing that differs an external web site and an intranet is the anonymous access. So turn your browser to SharePoint 2013 Websites: At this point, after almost one year since its preview release, we have to ...


2

"What do you need?" is certainly not enough and will lead to you receiving a lot of generic suggestions as your research group attempt to second-guess you and give you the answers they think you're looking for. Instead, focus them on common tasks - searching for a colleague's contact details, administering their employment - and look for ways to improve the ...


2

I agree with all of the answers here. I want to add another option you can consider based on option 2: Build modular content/data blocks. As the pain-point seems to be on the creation of assigned custom dashboards, can this not be dictated by the user? I recommend providing universal access to all content to start, then create a way for each person to ...


1

Similar to: what question should be asked to make a persona I had the same problem and didn't know what to ask users. After some research and thought, I came up with the following: Guidelines Use Primarily Open-Ended Questions Ask Naïve Questions Ask People to show You, not tell you, when possible Ask for specific stories,especially about anything you ...


1

I am mainly with Juan Lanus on this but, wanted to make some slightly different points/download. I think one to one interviews are best, and a semi formal interview is the best format. You need to realise you will always have the 'power' and part of your job is to allow the person to have control in the conversation. This is different to many other ...



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