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34

I have faced this challenge a few times and I have found the best ways to handle this would be to use the methods highlighted below or a use a combination of them: Conduct some usability tests and get some data about the pain points experienced by users using that specific module: I have generally found engineering teams are more receptive if they are ...


18

Apple is making quite a few UI changes to their applications in their upcoming OS 10.7 Lion release, which might be a good thing to talk about. Sample questions: How did they come to the decision to make their desktop apps more like their mobile versions, and what have they learned from the process? What are the basic UI/UX rules that all of their ...


14

First: Hello. Welcome. Thank you for coming to see us today. Take a seat. Coffee. Put interviewee at ease. Then: "Tell me about the experience you had getting here today." It has no correct answer since the interviewer knows nothing about the journey. But the interviewee actually undertook the complete experience so should be very much in a comfort zone. ...


8

Here are some tips: 1. Know your self: Identify your core UX skills. You may be specilized in one or more of the following: concept design, interaction design, information architecture, graphic design depending on your school of training.IF you haven't already read Jessee James Garrett's 'The Elements of User Experience' and review the digram articulating ...


7

Will you be meeting any designers? I think generally good design is a mix of training and art--so you might want to ask questions that try to get to the heart of who these people are. For example: where do you turn for design inspiration? how do you know when you've got it right? what's the hardest part of doing design? Hope that's a good start...


6

Personas aren't about a particular system so much as they are about a need that users have and the way(s) they currently address it. Your questions depend on and need to fit into the problem-space. For example, suppose you are in the research department of an auto manufacturer trying to design the next great hit. You might ask questions about the last ...


6

Firstly, it is a difficult situation to handle well. If your client doesn't want you to do the user interviews, you need to help them understand the impact that will have on the end product. You need to find out what matters most to the person making the decision and frame the problem in terms that matter to them. Lets say that customer adoption is the ...


6

I did my PhD on how sensitive information is managed in healthcare and in childcares, so this is a very important question. If you are at a University, you must get this passed by your IRB. If anything goes wrong or if information somehow is leaked, then your university is the one who is held liable. If you work for an organization, I also suggest getting ...


6

Some pre-interview tasks I can think about: Ask the user to review your own product (website/application). Come prepared with a list of good design, bad design and improvement suggestions. Give a longer design question: Design an app for setting alarms and reminders. Keep the question simple enough that it allows them to show their innovation and general ...


6

There's a number of reasons not to do this. It could be considered spec work. It's void of proper context and, as such, becomes more of a subjective heuristic review, at best. It's void of processes such as competitive research, data analysis, etc. It's void of history (maybe there were legit reasons why things were implemented as they were) It's an ...


5

Question: Many of Apples designs are based on restrictions and limiting design choices to the simplest and most convenient products and software. This is often in contrast to competitors products and actually viewed as a "disadvantage" to Apple products. Explain why you think these restrictions often lead to superior products and how important the influence ...


5

If you had the power to change one object/device/software application you use regularly, what would it be? How would you change it? I would then listen for answers to the 2 questions I didn't ask "why change it?" and "what will the implications be?" Everyone can come up with ideas but few people can explain them well and see the bigger picture.


4

The less questions you ask, the better. For personas development one should use interviews of the *ethnographic * kind (Google for it). In these interviews the subject is encouraged to talk freely, unconstrained. This is the best way to detect their cravings and frustrations. On the other hand, a set of preset questions implies a frame in the interviewer's ...


4

One thing we always do is a design exercise that is abstracted away from the specifics our application. It tests the creativity and interaction design talents of the applicant. There are half a dozen different answers, and any are good, we just want to see thought process. The specifics of the test have to do with taking something with alot of values and ...


4

I've also found it handy to offer to pitch in and help out with any updates/modifications, if you are comfortable getting your hands dirty with code. When I offer to write the HTML/CSS/JS necessary to get the change implemented, I've found that our developers are often receptive to making the changes (its still work on their parts, but offering to help out ...


4

Two questions for me: How do you show your designs to engineers? Please demonstrate an example of that? (show docs or whatever they do) At first, I thought "Show us a design document!" but then I realized they may not use design docs at all and might pair program with engineers and not have documents at all, who knows?! So the essence of the query is, ...


4

Similar to: What are good questions to ask when interviewing intranet users for persona development? Had the same problem; didn't know what to ask users. After some research and thought, I came up with the following: Guidelines Use Primarily Open-Ended Questions Ask Naïve Questions Ask People to show You, not tell you, when possible Ask for specific ...


4

This isn't always easy and you will most likely have to adapt whatever practice you decide on to fit your specific situation. If you're unable to observe people, or you're experimenting to learn about how to capture the right information, surveys can help you gain an initial understanding. The biggest problem with asking people why they do something is ...


4

(a) require low effort on the part of the participant I would use observation, since its a very reliable method and has very low impact on the users. You don't have to interfer in their work, just observe and take notes. If you feel you need to ask a user being observed what she did - go ahead if the timing feels right, if not - wait until a less ...


4

The only thing will truly give you enough context to evaluate a candidate, imo, is their process and ability to explain it. It also depends on the responsibilities of the position. UX is such a broad term that it has different tasks associated with it depending on where you are. Is the position more research focused? UI focused? etc. If there is a more ...


3

etc is no good here - We have no idea what you specifically mean by etc. location, occupation, biography, salary, online activities, hobbies, tech level, mobile comfort, social app use. In relation to 'the system': motivation to use the system, system goals, system domain knowledge. When you are putting the persona together, you can add a photo. Likes ...


3

Well - you'll be looking to sell yourself or your company to the right hire, because the right hire is going to be the one who has to make a choice between you and someone else. http://www.usefulusability.com/5-steps-to-an-uber-user-experience-job-description/


3

Have you considered talking to chess instructors? They should be able to give you a top-10 list of common problems beginner chess players face (across different age groups). This way, you don't have to limit your app to only address the piece-movement problem. You can even expand it to include simple chess puzzles, or introduce the player to the other chess ...


3

It depends on whether the various stakeholders have contrary interests (e.g. environmentalists and fracking companies), and on whether there would be a likely overlap between their areas of interest. Having a broader more diverse group will generally give more insightful results, but is also harder to manage in terms of conflict and even representation. If ...


3

Find a way to do your interviews through the "gatekeepers" that are telling you that you can't do direct client interviews. In my software design career, I've run into this exact problem more than once. While initially frsutrating, it doesn't have to be an impediment to your design process. Make a focused effort to figure out exactly what you want to know ...


3

I've just been asked to do just that but been given the task prior to the interview. It's not the first time. It is a great way to filter out those who are UX and those who are more interaction designers. I've been given a scenario and asked to review that against the existing site and then recommend what the next actions would be. The main problems may be ...


3

Yes. It is possible to be too logical in UX design; i.e., to over-analyze a problem. That's one reason why developers tend to be bad at it. Simpler is almost always better. UX design is more than bridging the gap between designers and developers. From my point of view, UX design is about making things easy and understandable for the user; i.e., UX ...


2

ok--I thought about it a bit more. I suppose to really learn all tricks and tips could take years. But if you can just ask one question, what about "what are the basic design principles that are the foundation for your UI designs?" I believe they may have a few answers. The follow up question might be "Where do I go to learn more?" I.e. where can I go to ...


2

Another Question: Apple employs a heavily regulated system in regards to the apps that are available in their app store. Their main competition however does not, and allows everything in, regardless of security issues how potentially distasteful the app may be (Dog Wars for example). With the rise of computers controlling cars, and entering many new areas ...


2

I'd ask employees what they see as the biggest contrast in process/methodology between the Apple way and the ways they've experienced at other organizations. I'd ask Steve what is plans are for cryogenic preservation so that we can be assured that Apple will be able to remain innovative for centuries to come.



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