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1

Bob has, I think the correct answer. I'd add two considerations specifically for your site: If it's a new, consumer-facing site, then the consumer will already have a learning curve to climb with understanding your site. Making that curve more difficult by introducing non-standard/unusual control designs makes for a worse learning experience (and ...


15

The style of shapes can alter the look and feel of the application and thus change the user experience. Apple got praise with their rounded corner movement showing that a different style shape can lead to a better User Experience. Lets look at examples Which image is easier to follow? Which Image would you prefer to look at (aka is easier ...


0

I would think about it on the basis of conversions (i.e. as a landing page). In the case of the Housing.com link the information could be considered by some to be, as you say, cramped and more difficult to digest effectively. In the case of AirBnB it feels more like a dedicated landing page in order to attempt to convert as many visitors as possible. ...


1

I would recommend sticking with Bootstrap as it is more design-agnostic. Use it as a starting point framework and build it to your design specification. Material Design is strong in it's statement about how everything should look, feel, and work. This is great for google to create consistency across it's products but likely not a fit for you unless you want ...


4

Material design provides the following benefits for web apps: It is a comprehensive UX + style framework, so it can speed up both design and development. It promotes responsive, multi-client user interfaces, in the sense that keyboard + mouse is a first class input method alongside touch and voice. So if you need your web app to work with mobile/tablets ...


0

Essentially the Material Design is a visual language developed for mobile and tablets. The very essence of it is "touch". Don't think its a good choice for web apps.


-1

I personally do not like material design on the web. If you look at http://inbox.google.com, they have used material design, but I believe it is confusing to get around and also a lot of space is wasted. It is frustrating when simple task like opening a folder requires an extra click. It is just not meant for desktop platforms to be used with a mouse (well ...


6

Its a visual indicator that his action was successful and system can use the jack now. It can be considered as a derivative of Neilson's heuristic i.e. Visibility of system status The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time. Though a popup is intrusive and not the best ...


1

A "View" is a single display unit. This entire web page is a single view. If you open up an app, that entire page is a view. You may have other views that are easy to reach, but what you see (with scrolling) on a single page is the view. For web, it's simpler, obviously. Links typically distinguish between various "views", which are individual web pages. ...


1

Lenovo isn't the only one; Samsung and a lot of other PC makers do this. Their reasoning is that if your headphones don't work for whatever reason, the user isn't made aware of it at all. So the slight pop-up is an alert that yes, you're plugged in. Some of the smarter built computers also will differentiate between headphones and headsets (with a ...


0

Considering that this an e-commerce website it'd be very recommendable to give the search field more presence since it's very likely that the users will try to search for an specific product before starting the navegation through categories or other means that your site provide. Additionally be sure that the search works as expected, because in other cause ...


2

It's rarely a good idea to make up meaningful (non-decorative) UI elements just to balance out the screen. The point is usually to remove stuff, not to add stuff :). This is for all kinds of reasons - cognitive load, visual clutter, focusing the user on what matters etc. As to the problem at hand, you can tackle it in a number of ways. The important thing ...


3

The example you're providing might work well if you have the space for it, but something like Chosen could work even better. In the example below, Chosen is the version on the right: This should also be rather intuitive to users, since this is how e.g. email clients behave when adding recipients.


1

Revisiting this question and having resolved my problems I see that there were two issues preventing an accepted answer. Firstly, the fault was mine - I don't think I formed the question well. I was asking something too specific whereas really I should have been taking a step back and looking at the documentation style as a whole. I shouldn't have asked ...


1

Just an idea that might help or give an other perspective. Old conventions are often intuitive until the point where your target audience is to young to remember. Analog clocks work by rotating the wheel, just one wheel. You have to keep turning it until you reached the right time. Intuitive? Most likely, but efficient? Not really. To perhaps make it more ...


2

Quick critique: Feature-richness vs ergonomic minimalism is a key tradeoff here. You want the remote to be fully featured, but to be simple enough to use that it's not intimidating. That is a balance that most remotes do NOT get right. Circular shapes are problematic here. I understand why you would use circular shapes because they are 'friendly'. But ...


3

I agree with the comments mentioning the need to capture frequently used browser functionality but given the controls shown in your mock-up (7-8 items) I think a possible solution could focus on the following: 1. Grouping controls in one location: By doing so you can remove clutter, preserve some room to scale-up if you need to include additional ...



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