New answers tagged

2

I think that weekly total sales also be different from each other. In order to show overall performance, two different interconnected bar-chart can be a good solution for your problem.


1

Pie charts are not good when you have to compare. Also, they have a limit of how many values to represent. I would recommend a horizontal bar chart. Comparisons are much more easy and you can have many values. Also, the names of the employees are much more easy to read. Keep the bar chart simple : Do not add grid-lines. X-axis values are not needed. Place ...


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Here I attach 2 options to display the information which you want. This is my idea and this is wire-frame only so don't consider it as design. I commented necessary information so please read it carefully. I hope you will have clear idea that what I am trying to explain. Images shown below are just for the example purpose. These are the screens :


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Welcome to UXSE. This is a good approch. But I have something different. Added one new feature hope you like it. Refer image:


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An idea: With so many potential variables, a nice feature might be to provide "templates" for the most commonly needed rules so a user doesn't always have to start from scratch. How much of the work can you do for them ahead of time? The user could modify, duplicate these preexisting samples to more easily customize a rule to do just what they wanted. ...


1

I don't believe there is a specific design pattern for your exact example. But you want to combine a Tunnel with the Wizard. You might also consider the Good Defaults pattern if you feel there is need to influence the decision of the user.


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Double clicking isn't intuitive, and having to explain that behavior through a popup is a waste of space on your form, plus it isn't always visually appealing. An idea I have in mind is to use "slide to delete" which most people are familiar with nowadays. Even though its less used on desktop the idea is the same that users can use mouse to slide the button ...


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Generally speaking, no. You're basically implementing a software equivalent to a guarded switch. This is not a pattern that the large majority of users are familiar with and it will cause confusion on initial use. It is a button that looks like any other button, but behaves differently. It is also unclear how I use the button. Do I click once, get the ...


2

I worked at Google for 2 years and we had many challenges using the Material design style guide for the non-mobile-only software applications that we were creating. The style guide is clearly for mobile and has no guidelines for how to apply it to non-touch-screen devices (laptop/desktop). Unless you're designing mobile-first, or responsive (assuming ...


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Lets look at this way. Arrow certainly indicates a sub-nav, but few things need to considered - 1) If your navigation has some other items that do not have a sub-navigation, then it might make good sense to add that arrow to differentiate it from other nav categories. A good example could be Amazon (check screenshot) - See how the "Shop by Category" nav ...


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I think Abhishek Sharma is on the right track. However, I also think the following isn't clear: When I look at the above, it's now clear to me that I've selected Create a live photo, but it's not clear to me what the Video | Photo option is for? I guess it wouldn't take long to figure out, especially if you're using it, but I do feel it's missing ...


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As per my point of view the notification banner two buttons needs to be changed. It must be like: So, that user do not confuse in refresh buttons.


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See the color: At very first look to this image, I can't able to see "Create A live Photo" as it is in dark color over the dark BG. Read more about Colors You have logo in pink color you can use grey color for inactive links. if you want to remove this small triangle you can remove it, it will look good without this also. Hope you understood the ...


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I think the cause of the confusion is your colour choice : the use of black and white is so mixed such that it is unclear to the user "including myself" which one is the highlight colour and which is the background colour. So, my advice : change highlight color, it should be unique and obvious .


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Using two different words for the export (e.g., export, save) is a little confusing. It's better to be consistent; make both export or both save. If you're going to specify tag free, separate that from the action. Here are some formatting alternatives: EXPORT | TAG FREE or EXPORT (TAG FREE) EXPORT | WITH TAG or EXPORT (WITH TAG) Watermarks are fairly ...


1

Why are you using 'Export' word in red button and 'Save' in text Button? I see a good approch. But Text Button looks very different, I thought it will have different funtionality. Both buttons belong to same group. So design keeping consistency. See above, it looks like both are clickable and are buttons.


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As a compromise, I suggest you put a visual sign: one arrow for a start (and only one) in a distinguished place, like next to the home button. That indicates that all the next buttons are dropdown menus. I said arrow for a start, but it doesn't have to be an arrow.


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Yes, you need arrows. All touchscreen devices cannot hover, so you must include information about the nature of a menu item, as it cannot be discerned or discovered by hovering. Some might argue you could/should detect if it's a touch device and then add the arrows. No. Because: A user might have their touch device set to spoof as desktop browser A user ...


8

It used to be that arrows were preferred as they provided a visual cue to users there was more to the menu if they clicked on / hovered over them. Over time web developers started making these menus activate on both a click and hover, in which case the arrows aren't necessary as users by default will click or tap on a menu item. If doing so then reveals a ...


0

Bit hard to say for certain without some images to go with your scenario. It's generally a good idea to maintain consistency for common actions, such as close. If you're using apps like OpenOffice, it's probably fair to assume your expected behavior is frequent (e.g., people use the devices regularly). So, I'd expect people to habitualize common actions ...


2

Chat bots are not a new concept, but still in their infancy. Thanks to deep learning they start to mature. A lot of user research should be done so that they can be accepted by the society and avoid being called stupid bots. Amelia is interesting implementations I know: a virtual call centre agent that uses deep learning which can successfully handle 60% of ...


4

Understand the intent of user Extract relevant information Good Analysis Converse with user in a natural way Understanding the intent of user is the hard part in natural language and there are certainty rate involved for this(in many cases). In addition to this; each language has its own specific features. Questions and commands are ...


2

There's quite a few good ideas/references here, especially to some existing approaches. Often, though not always, Apple's approach is a good place to start - but perhaps in your case it may not be. I get the impression (though you haven't actually said it) that you're working with an awful lot of data comprised of many many fields/variables. I agree that ...


1

It is hard to pin down exactly what is intuitive for something that has traditionally been dealt with by technical users (that won't necessarily find interfaces more user-friend compared to command prompts). There is a particular reason for this efficiency, as queries can be unambiguously specified and executed in a command-line prompt. Also, it probably ...


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Rename the "Cut" operation of the device to "Slice" or something similarly effective but not confusingly part of cut/copy/paste lexicon.


2

I think your analogy is a little incorrect: The pedestrian has every intention to cross on the correct signal but the system does not respond quickly enough for them. Button pressing is a programmed behaviour; we learn very early in life that when we press a button something happens - usually immediately. In the case of the crossing (also with lifts) we ...


2

As opposed to re-using pivot tables as I previously answered, this is an experimental UI that I thought of to handle the repetitive need for writing AND or OR. It relies on one element you must learn that ANDs are horizontal and ORs are vertical. It manages to deal with fairly complex Boolean logic though. Overview Assume that A, B, C, D, and E are ...


1

If you are using Material Design than it won't be a problem. Make a big card approx. 45% of screen height for Event and slim cards for articles. Use bright color for event card and some cold color for articles (all article must be of same color so that they will look like normal cards. It will be better if you use proper shadow and transition effect for ...


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One simple solution would be to use distinguishably different background colors for events and articles, and priorities would accordingly be set. This way, you'd be able to come around the space constraint, and as a bonus, would be able to create a particular theme, which could be used to keep the users familiar with the application if it's platforms are to ...


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My personal preference would be: keep the tabs on the left, use background color for the selected tab same as the inner box border color, separate groups of digits, e.g. 1000-054, use a gray x on each tab, which would be highlighted on hover to a red x, and a + sign on the bottom tab there are plenty of inspirations for vertical tabs, close tab, add new ...


2

Different Interfaces for two different functionality Example case: Car air condition interfaces As many example of car air conditions the first on/off functionality defined with a toggle button (light indicator); while heating adjustment element is defined with (knob and blue-red colors). Colors are not the only variable that you can play when you ...


2

Never depend on color alone for a critical interface component. Many people, perhaps upwards of 1 in 10, have some form of color-blindness that limits their perception of certain colors. Staring at colors can lead to our eyes/brains inverting colors, where you literally see a totally different color. Green become red, yellow becomes blue. Early astronauts ...


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Tabs are good Having persistently available tabs supports the idea of recognition over recall. It's theoretically harder for a user to forget language n when it's sitting right there in the UI. But not here Tabs should be relatively few in number (I like 3-7). Any control in too great a number can become noise and users will inadvertently block it from ...


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Tl;dr: On = green, hot = amber, off+cold = not lit. Read on to understand why. You need to encode to pieces of information which are not completely synchronized. There are four states to communicate: The kettle is off, the kettle is cold. The kettle is on, the kettle is cold. The kettle is on, the kettle is hot. The kettle is off, the kettle is hot. ...


2

Yellow = hot (the sun) and on (electricity, light bulbs, etc.) Blue = cold (ice, sky) and off (calming color)


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I had a similar problem with a project I was working on, where there were thousands of tags. How many are you dealing with? There are a couple of things to think about BEFORE doing an import that will aid your design: 1. Do we need ALL the tags? - or can they be cleaned up Often this can be the case where people have added countless spellings, plurals for ...


1

Since this is specifically for a kettle, they traditionally have an LED light to indicate when they're in the process of boiling. Once boiled, this light goes off. Your app could mimic this behaviour, and optionally show some muted text that says "Boiling..." nearby. If your app knows the temperature of the water, you could separately show a traditional ...


4

From another answer of mine, I highly suggest that you consider using "switches" that minimc real-world switches to clarify state: With these designs the state of the switch is very clear, so the colors can be fit to the application at hand.


1

Go "Grayed-Out" with the On/Off Toggle I would suggest using the "grayed out" approach for the ON/OFF TOGGLE, rather than color-coding. Rely on language, not color here. Not a great example, but bear with me please... I'm pressed for time. Ignore the orange... or maybe not... that (or a more benign color) may work. For the temperature, go for it with ...


8

I would like to point out that for ON/OFF there are unicode symbols, see: http://unicodepowersymbol.com/ ⏻ Power: U+23FB ⏼ Toggle Power: U+23FC ⏽ Power On: U+23FD ⭘ Power Off: U+2B58 In my opinion, the color code green = ON and red = OFF is not very widespread, and therefore the risk of confusion is low. As far as my ...


2

For creating relatively complex single table queries, pivot tables are very useful. Good stuff You can get SUM, AVG and GROUP with relatively little knowledge. By splitting fields across columns vs rows you get AND queries The totals give you OR queries You can properly 'build' queries - i.e. you can quickly see a master set, then add rows / columns and ...



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