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1

Best way has fulfill two needs: Explain the user error Stop the error from occurring This is best done with an alert, typically. The language you use is up to you. I'd suggest something like "D'oh! You already have [taskname]" But be aware of the usability challenges associated with it. Does the alert offer a way to retain the data, meaning return to ...


0

iOS doesn't have a default radio button. You can either use a third-party plugin to create a custom radio button like this or you can use iOS other default elements: a picker a switch


1

UIPickerView You may want to use a UIPickerView for something like that. https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/UIKit/Reference/UIPickerView_Class/index.html UITableView There’s plenty of other alternatives that could be good, it really depends on the app’s structure. You’ll notice that lots of the options in Settings use a ...


1

Usually this is done using a table view, which is basically a list of items as well, only with a checkmark instead of a radio button. Sometimes such lists are on a new 'page' in the navigation structure. How this fits in your navigational structure depends on the context.


1

We have decided to go with "Need Attention" and "Archived". We tested it with our users and it works ok. We also tried "Active" before, but it was confusing, because the items we display can be "Active" and "Closed" regardless on their location in my app.


37

Create a repository with actions from where they can be dragged to days. The question is what happens when you try to drag an item to a day that is already occupied. Replace the item and send the previous one to the repository Swap both items. In this case, if you start with a preset for every day you don't even need the repository.


8

Try drag and drop.. have a table or placeholders for Weekdays and user should be able to drag and drop activities (Run, Rest...) for each day.. it would be quite clear to the user that he/she would need to select 1 activity for each day.


2

It is extremely complex problem, because your user may want to change picket combination. Imagine that he/she decides to do that in step "Sunday". One click needs to change one of previous answers. Also consider how people makes plans. For me I do plans accoding to time, not actions, so natural for me would be to assign activity to a day, not a day to ...


4

Since every choice must be unique, you can highlight this fact in your choice matrix after each selection, reducing the complexity offered to the user: Additionally, you can add a 'reset' button, letting the user start over if they want to start afresh. This is a multi-choice matrix, and unless there is an specific need to be different, the standard ...


1

One way to accomplish this would be to place a label, for instance the word 'tap' or 'continue' at the bottom. Users would see that and select it to continue. However, if in addition to that, you make the whole screen respond to a tap then, as users become more comfortable with the application they will know that they can, in fact, click anywhere.


2

On the other hand, Blizzard, one of the companies best known for their intuitive UI, has done this for their iOS Hearthstone app: Simply saying "Tap anywhere to continue" isn't out of the question if you don't do it every other second.


2

I got addicted to the addictinggames.com website for my flash game fix back in it's infancy and the complete list of games didn't have a scroll bar and watched them grow. I got the impression that in the game in question your going to be seeing the game over screen every 5 seconds until you learn the basic skills needed to survive. In that case my solution ...


3

In Material Design on Android it's common to make displays as virtual "cards" that overlay, say, the left 80% of the screen. The user swipes right to left to dismiss the card and return to the previous screen, which is partially visible behind the card. By visually layering the content, the user has a clear cue they can get back to the content below by ...


23

What's the issue with giving the user a predefined region of space with some sort of indicator that that space is where they should tap to continue - a button with an appropriate continue icon (the right-ward arrow is popular), for instance? From a UX perspective, you're removing a level of complexity by removing an unnecessary choice, namely where on the ...


4

I think this can be handled by looking at how you've prepared the user experience thus far. If the game has had several screens with small load-times up to this point, then the user will expect to have to do some waiting at these screens while the game loads/gets enough time to deliver a message, to continue. If you consistently have 'forced' the user to ...


3

If the elements are required for proper navigation then don't think about clutterness, You can provide any button to 'go back' or to 'continue' in minimalist design. I also suggest to provide the 'Re-play' option on 'Lost' screen to play again.


5

"On that screen, the user can tap anywhere to return to the gameplay screen." Without knowing what "gameplay screen" here are two suggestions. A common iOS strategy of presenting several view screens (gameplay and the one shown here?) is pushing and popping views via the navigation controller. That is if said view is a child of the 'gameplay view'. The ...


4

In the game "Two Dots", messages are shown in small dialog windows that have no buttons. To dismiss these, you have to tap on the background. Perhaps this solution could work for you.


51

There is no good way Here's the design logic: Backgrounds are perceived by users as backgrounds, i.e. inert and uninteractable. This is obvious. In order to communicate to users that the background is tappable, you need to tell them that. The most reliable way of doing this is to sign it, i.e. Tap to continue. Note that trying to do something fancy ...


6

There is an excellent article over at gamasutra which explains it all, but I'll go over what each mean Non-Diegetic In terms of game UI, Non-Diegetic is what you would normally associate a typical game UI, an overlay on top of the game. They have the freedom to be completly removed from the games fiction. Non-Diegetic UIs can represent health and ammo or ...


0

As some of the comments have already discussed, it's more important that there is consistency throughout the application for all buttons. The user's response will come from a change in hue regardless of whether you choose to illuminate the button or shade it. To answer your direct question: For the reasons above, I don't believe that either way is ...


0

Illuminated on Hover is Likey More Intuitive You make a great point about the physical metaphor to a shadow cast over a button, but many interfaces have standardized a depressed button appearance to be a darker button with a small shadow cast by the button's "container". A dark hover state that transitions to a dark depressed button state would not ...


2

That notification comes from software that is used on multiple lenovo laptops. In some cases, there is one audio port (1/8 inch / 3.5mm). The audio port serves as input and output. If you have a lenovo laptop with one port, further dialogue takes place asking what the device is (headphone, microphone, line in, etc.) For one port machines, I think it is ...



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