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0

Your clickable area doesn't have to be bigger than it needs to be to actually click, taking into account the size of fingers and the fact that some people don't have the motor skills with mice and fingers. From this article we see guidelines raging from 28px (Nokia) to 44px (Apple) but the article goes on to quote research here and here that shows the larger ...


0

Numeric Input Pattern, as suggested terminology from HTML5: http://html5pattern.com/ I see it as a Subset of a Numeric Input.


1

Companies frequently make this mistake for naive reasons. Examples: "our internal users should understand what external users see", "we should eat our own dogfood", "it's a cost saving", "it would betray our brand if we use other software". The truth is: the difference between internal and external users is the same as the difference between any two user ...


4

I am trying to come up with some common terms and definitions that are suitable to use for specification or design documents I don’t think i can come-up with a better suggestion than the one you mentioned "formatted' numeric input field" Its the best possible outcome and I don't think you should worry too much because its long, though you can make ...


1

You're right that there isn't a great mapping between the input boxes and the shape on screen. But, I would guess that other UX priorities dominate the layout issue here because: The x/y/rot/dimensions controls aren't used very often, so they don't need to be prominent (or even noticeable under regular use). They usually just need to be easily ...


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The term used for these format-constrained inputs is masked inputs or mask input. Here is a demo which includes a broad range of masks (date, time, phone number, etc). If you Google 'masked input' you will find plenty more examples. http://igorescobar.github.io/jQuery-Mask-Plugin/ And a screenshot for posterity in case the link dies in the future. It ...


2

I'm not sure it's deliberately obscure, but rather a victim of circumstance. For example, the UX team's requirements might have been: We need to show how long ago a post/tweet was shared, as it creates a sense of immediacy and relevance We need to provide a link an individual post/tweet We need to cut down on UI clutter for the majority of users 99.9% of ...


0

For 3D navigation in a CAD model or landscape, you are actually talking about 6 degrees of orientation, because you've got 3 degrees of translational movement (X, Y, Z) and an additional 3 degrees to describe rotational orientation of the view. If you also include zoom in and out, that's 8 degrees. I don't really like the Autodesk widget. Problems with ...


0

I'll answer the second question (what is the best 3d navigation method) as it's unclear to me whether you can freely/legally use Autodesk's cube. When the main task is manipulating an object, you want to be able to control the view in terms of perspective vs. orthogonal projection, and separately zoom/rotate/slide the object in all directions. For this ...


0

You don't like the term type so how about structured or structured input. Formatted is not a good as a date has many formats. If I understand what you are asking why not just use what is called in HTML - type Why not just go by the actual input type name and call them types The tech name as in <input type="text" The type values/names are pretty ...


2

These are units or formats you are talking about. For example a date is a numeric format that consists of three units: years months and days. It will depend on the context which term to use actually. Since the question got edited it is now clear that it is about inputs that guide users to a valid format. In that case guided/guiding inputs could be an ...


0

The "best practice" today is to provide keyboard shortcuts, but really design the UX so it is fully operable without shortcuts. Reasons: Cross platform - Most people want web apps to work on tablets and phones, where mouse-keyboard combinations don't exist. Even if you have a dedicated apps for tablets and phones, you still have a problem because users ...


0

Foregoing any visual controls in your interface has numerous issues. Such an approach breaks 3 of Nielsen's 10 heuristics most obviously. First, this breaks the concept of Graphical User Interface and user expectations of interaction. People are used to manipulating objects on the screen directly, meaning most people will expect to be able to use their ...


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As DA01 suggests, Apple and Amazon have probably done most of the research for you. "Be the first to review this!" adds a little cachet that is likely to appeal to some users. If your users are also signed in with a social network to the level where you can monitor their connections you might also be able to use "Be the first among your friends to review ...


0

Re: other options & considerations... For dates like airline or hotel reservations (usually later in the current year) I personally prefer the simultaneous ability to enter text or choose from a pop-up calendar. For a web-app there are jQuery plugins that can accomplish this pretty nicely, or just use the native datePicker control, which people ...


4

This is very straightforward: you have to use the standard date picker control for each platform as outlined in the appropriate design guide. Here's Android class reference, iOS class reference, and Windows Phone class reference. If you're working on a web app, it's still better to use native date pickers to minimize user confusion and provide a consistent ...


1

During my work, I found that most people (including me) like single fields together with a format helper label (_____ DD/MM/YYYY) best. It is easy and fast to type and everyone should get the formatting hint. Plus, it's easy to evaluate and work with afterwards in your program. Bonus: Most mobile devices have the common separators (/,.) present on the ...


0

I just wish to point out that there is a third option that in many cases (though not necessarily in this one) is better: Save the state of the form, but do not 'apply' it. So if for example the user comes back after accidentally closing the dial/having a computer crash/whatever he will be either presented with the form as he left it (option 3) or the option ...


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Version 1: PROs Is clear what the user is doing (saving or canceling) CONS The user could leave midway or something similar and not save. It gives the user more to think about (even if it is not much). It is the old way of doing things. Version 2: PROs It asks less of the user (they don't have to save or don't) Assumes that if the user edited, ...


2

Two suggestions: I would show the "Selected Group Title" and "Detailtext" as a tooltip/popover in the chart and change the background color of the selected group element (much more visible than indenting) This way you have all your information in one place (the chart) and don't need to look at different places fot the title, description, percentages, ... ...


0

Displaying just 1 will make the other lose a good part of its meaning. For example, unless the review is very detailed, **what would be your impression of a product with 1 start (or 5) if t has just 1 review vs one that has 500 reviews?* It's a very different situation! If you don't display the numbers of reviews too, you could be creating a possible false ...


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Why are keyboards still the predominant input device? Short answer : The keyboard has prevailed because its tactile properties, flexibility and efficiency have not yet been surpassed by other technologies. Longer answer: It all boils down to what exactly the keyboard was and intended to do! The evolution of the keyboard from the printing press to ...


3

I very much suspect that the foundation of your question is flawed. Whilst the keyboard is doubtless the primary input device for the Personal Computer, human interaction with computers is not bound by that limit. Just consider all the user experiences that a human may have with a computer every day. Communication/Entertainment: Smart TV Telephony Smart ...


1

The main reason is simply that the vast majority of tasks and time spent on a computer by any human deals with text. Most people don't use a computer for much other than reading or writing text in some form, be it logging on to myface, typing in the latest chicken pie recipes, reading a volume of "Lord of the Potters" or searching on yougle. For dealing ...


1

Maybe the keyboard already isn't the predominant input device anymore. An estimate that is already over a year old suggests that there are more smartphones than PCs in the world. People probably don't develop software or write books with them but they search the web, write email, blog, etc. Now, if you are a 30-something working in IT in North America or ...


5

It's not a lot of information. Amazon already do something similar. It's quite informative.


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A one-sentence version of Turch's answer: Because you use keyboard by fingers. How many fingers do you have? Compare that number to the number of mouth (voice input), wrists (mouse). The more fingers you have, the more combinations can be done. What about touching screen and controller, they all use fingers? I haven't had a chance to use real touching ...


2

It takes years of practice to become a good touch typist. It's not something you can relearn overnight - so basically the interface has to remain physically the same to be usable. ADDED: And I therefore because one has a 'lot invested' in using a keyboard there's a tendency to stick to the keyboard if some other method requires time and effort to learn. ...


2

Love this question. Let's also remember that keyboards as a means of using the digits to communicate ideas predate computers by at least hundreds of years. I began studying piano nearly forty years ago, and about three years ago took up bayan, or Russian chromatic button accordion. Have been a rather comfortable and fast hunt-and-pecker for decades and just ...


3

The reason they have stayed essentially the same doesn't have a lot to do with UX. It's mostly due the market. If you're selling a text input device, you want it to be mostly interoperable with what people are used to and with the hardware and software they are using. There are variations, but the markets for those are small simply because most people ...


2

I think it's incorrect to claim that keyboards haven't changed. There have been at least 3 significantly different designs since the IBM PC was introduced. From the original design with function keys on the left http://www.vintage-computer.com/ibm_pc.shtml to the AT 101+ version with function keys on the top and those annoying duplicated cursor keys, to ...


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Their usefulness scales beautifully with experience and developed skill Someone who knows only a little bit of numbers and letters can use a keyboard for a variety of tasks, even without knowing about the importance of the "shift key". As each button on the keyboard is labeled clearly with what each key will output when pressed, a person can guess quite ...


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Keyboards are the ideal human/computer interface design until we can directly control computers with our minds. That's a bold statement, especially since most depictions of the future in popular culture show us all the cool ways we will be able to interface with a computer. To back that statement up, I'm going to define the problem keyboards solve first. ...


41

Rewobs answer is already excellent, but for a deeper understanding it's valuable to consider what alternatives we have. Chorded keyboard Already in the mother of all demos in 1968 an alternative input device was proposed: the chorded keyboard (though the concept is even older). The idea is that instead of moving your fingers to dedicated keys one at a ...


-2

Eventually speaking to a computer will dethrone keyboards. HCI experts have been saying this since the 90s. Better keyboard experiences have existed since the 30s (DVORAK) but the cost of re-learning to type is too high and convention wins out. In many situations, convention always wins. We have 60 seconds in a minute instead of 100. 12 hours in the morning ...


5

Keyboards have won and remain unchanged because of accuracy and they conveniently have an alphabet on them which is nice. A keyboard key has two states, pressed and not pressed, highly reliable and accurate. Spelling deficiencies and jumbo-hand syndrome can be corrected through either education or providing a keyboard which meets their size needs. Other ...


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Because of: Familiarity: Everyone has more or less learned to use it and a lot of users don't even need to take a look at at individual keys to type. Although not physically, it's present and has the same layout across devices. Usefulness: You can perform an incredible HUGE variety of task just with a keyboard. Accessibility: It provides an accessible ...



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