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1

Why is there no standard layout for computer keyboards? Because there is no keyboard governing body mandating everyone build keyboards the same way. That and history...every computer design had its own keyboard designed for the particular needs of the hardware and software being used. Over time, keyboards have become much more similar than different, ...


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There is some evidence that suggests labels above their relevant inputs is preferable to labels on the left of the inputs (http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2006/07/label-placement-in-forms.php) You should also add more space between the fields to make them easier to recognize as individual units. It looks like you may have some grouped fields there so ...


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In order to make the controls more usable I recommend having as few free entry fields as possible. Go for combo boxes, date/hour pickers, prefill the values where possible, offer partially filled templates and so on. This makes data entry take less time and decreases the mental load by using recognition over recall. As for the layout, you can spatially ...


2

First, there is some standard. We have the QUERTY arrangement, CTRL, SHIFT, ALT and ENTER are arranged more or less the same. Your question is actually "why are not all keyboards have identical layout?". So it is the same as asking "why are not all toasters/refrigerators/ovens/cars have identical layout"? It may be all about money. Some possible answers to ...


1

As @Peter has already said, most users will probably recognize the pattern regardless of what text it contains but you could always test out the theory by printing out a bunch of mockups with your text, his text and no text, and then just spend an afternoon in a coffee shop or shopping mall asking people to look at them at random and tell you where they'd ...


2

The first question I would ask is why does he suggest using this? I find most fears about 'Users won't recognise ...' are unfounded: in both cases you have a form and a button; there is a good visual association between the two and it's just the wording that has changed, so users are likely to make the association. 'Sign in' has the benefit of being ...


1

https://developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/ios/documentation/UserExperience/Conceptual/UIKitUICatalog/UIDatePicker.html http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/controls/pickers.html They are just called date pickers in iOS guidelines. Android generally terms them Pickers for both date and time. These are just customizations of already existing ...


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It's known as picker or spinner. First example looks like a custom designed one, but it can be done with this tutorial, your second example is the native iOS6 picker (now it has changed to a flat look)


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The context menu key – along with the Windows keys – is the most recent addition to the PC keyboard. The Microsoft Natural Keyboard, released ca. 1994–1995, was the first one to include them "for future uses". That "future use" was the UI introduced with Windows 95 – the first to make heavy use of context menus. The latter were around in previous versions ...


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Before mice, there was no programming method to show a context menu. When mice appeared, there was no right-click. When extra buttons appeared, then the context menu made sense whenever applications were programmed for it. A context menu key on the keyboard usually did nothing, and when it did, the mouse was a better interface to show the menu. Web ...


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Back in the mists of time, before the mouse was so ubiquitous, most people navigated their file system using just a keyboard (I am old enough to have actually worked like this!). Opening files was simple: you left'ed, right'ed, up'd, down'd and tabbed your way to the file and hit enter. The problem came, however, when you wanted to do something with the file ...


1

It depends on the use case. Many laptops have done away with the key because of space limitations and the need to fit the arrow keys in the bottom right corner. Many full-size desktop keyboards have removed it in place of other keys. Frankly, most people don't use that context key. Here's why: most of us are right handed, so if we use it, we'll use the left ...


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In the years I have been Using computers (and typewriters for that matter), I have seen three schools of thought in keyboard design. I am going to call them the minimalists, the bells and whistles crowd, and the moderates. The minimalist battle cry varies from 'look at those clean lines' or 'nothing to get in your way' to 'save money' or 'save space'. The ...


1

The modal part looks correct, although more info is needed. For example, if you're simply adding the summary data to a data container (in this case a modal) you could simply use a box container and drag and drop the summary data (buttons? Text? Actions?) As for your other elements, they are tabbed content. The first one even shows a vertical tabbed content ...


0

It really depends on when the problem is, if you are not happy with the 'look and feel' of the ui then you need to work with the users to find out what they want/need form the ui - shown them what you have done and many try some low fidelity paper prototypes. Don't be afraid to print out you ui let them draw in it. If you are not happy with Glade+gtk as a ...


2

"Request a feature" is quite an abstract concept so I don't think there would be a clear conventional icon to use here. Here are my suggestions: You could think about a speech bubble to represent the "request" part. A light bulb is another one that could work as it suggests a new idea. A rocket is a bit of a strange one but could suggest ...


5

I can't speak for everyone, but I'm a heavy keyboard user and I think I can count on one hand the number of times I've used that key. (mostly because my mouse was acting up/battery died). I think it is a key that just didn't have a really good (to many) purpose. PS pressing Shift + F10 still works as a keyboard shortcut. For what it's worth I fully ...


0

I'd suggest to be more direct. start by explaining abbreviations. While they're obvious, always consider the user doesn't know about them with those abbreviations explained, use them to create sets. So NO will include all sub sets of Norway. And similarly, since Finland set ISN'T EMPTY, you need to create a sub-set for Finland as well now, keep this in ...


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You stress the importance of not having the search button at the top, but what if the bar and results still appeared from top-down upon pressing the button? Something like so:


3

Consider separating out the number entry from the units


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It would seem to me that the bell icon is fairly common for "notifications/alerts". Not quite sure why it was adopted as such, but one theory could be that bells have historically been tied to either time notifications [(church bells or clock towers)][1], warnings, or event kick-off. Might be a bit more abstracted these days, like showing a floppy disk for a ...


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Three reasons: New information comes onto the page. Information leaves the page Something on the page reacts to the user Whenever one of these three things happens on a page, that's a good time to consider adding an animation to demonstrate What Is Happening/Going to Happen/Has Happened.


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The model that springs to mind for me are the widgets used in graphics tools for defining gradients, particularly those that allow for multi-stop gradients. Take, for example, Pixelmator. You start by defining the start and end stops of the gradients - the first and last colour. You can then click the mouse anywhere over the body of the gradient to add a ...


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I would suggest an interaction like the following. On the left side there is a navigation on top level categories, which as you scroll down or click updates the section on the right.When a new item is added you can show an overlay popup for customization. On the right side you keep a summary of what is going so far, and what else the creator has to fill (I ...


0

How about showing one question at a time instead of all four together. This way the form won't feel difficult to use and you can keep the user focused. Especially for the second question since it look a bit more complicated. As the options are selected you can show the running total in a sidebar.


2

I'm a fan of using a dashed underline to indicate a tooltip.


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A tool-tip is not the UI you are looking for As you correctly state tooltip is suitable for information on a specific item. Not the intent of the whole UI. What you want to do is present an option for "in-line help" on the UI here are ideas on how to do this include interactive callout, embedded text or icon download bmml source – Wireframes ...


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This answer is merely a proposal for the same question @user1938107 asks. Originally, I wanted to discus it with you people and then I came along this treat. I took inspiration from the SolidWorks interface and came up with the following controls:


1

I totally agree. I like optional radios, i think the best way is just to implement optional radios! Even though they are non standard, Its better for some use cases because it makes it easier to skip things (leave everything blank) and deselect things especially if there are a lot of radios and all you know is you want to undo your choice. Also having ...



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