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0

The other two answers as they stand right now are good. I'd argue that you could make the entire "Card" a link to the item and then have a nice-sized button like "Sign up" or "RSVP" for the call to action. I'd also design out a hover state for the entire card to show that it's clickable and give an idea that it's going to the detail page, but also keep the ...


0

Well, you have 2 actions here (register and see details), so at some point of the interaction flow, you'll need to include those 2 actions. You have several way to do it, the obvious one is to have a link fro each one of the actions. Not necessarily a button, just a link should be enough. But of course, you have more options, and you have to consider the ...


0

It can be hard to visualize this without some type of example, however.... I'd do both, and see if it becomes visually redundant. A CTA is a great way to make the path clear, but at the same time, it can be frustrating to users when titles aren't clickable. Often times in e-commerce sites, users become frustrated when they can't click on just the titles of ...


2

If it's a website that has a lot of products in many categories, showing the category is a good way to help the user find what they are looking for. Example: when a user is searching for: game of thr Game of thrones in books Game of thrones in DVDs Game of thrones in eBooks Game of thrones Game of throubles Game of three and so on..


0

It's quite common on mobile keyboards now. Sort of. The line of suggestions is positioned horizontally over the keyboard not in the text. However, Victor's very efficient solution makes one assumption the everyday user does not agree with: that users want to type first and spell check later while editing. We aren't that concerned about craft, on the whole. ...


0

I would think about it on the basis of conversions (i.e. as a landing page). In the case of the Housing.com link the information could be considered by some to be, as you say, cramped and more difficult to digest effectively. In the case of AirBnB it feels more like a dedicated landing page in order to attempt to convert as many visitors as possible. ...


2

Its a nice question! I agree there is confusion among many people and drawing a line between all the branches is difficult. Reason being all the branches mentioned overlaps at one point or other. The answer actually lies in the names but due to their overlapping nature people do get confused. Even the companies while writing job descriptions. Understand, ...


1

This article is on the old side but can maybe point you in the right direction - http://pando.com/2013/10/18/smartphones-are-making-shopping-more-fun/


2

This question is a bit vague but take a look at The concept of Gamification. Gamification techniques strive to leverage people's natural desires for socializing, learning, mastery, competition, achievement, status, self-expression, altruism, or closure. Early gamification strategies use rewards for players who accomplish desired tasks or competition to ...


6

Its a visual indicator that his action was successful and system can use the jack now. It can be considered as a derivative of Neilson's heuristic i.e. Visibility of system status The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time. Though a popup is intrusive and not the best ...


1

Lenovo isn't the only one; Samsung and a lot of other PC makers do this. Their reasoning is that if your headphones don't work for whatever reason, the user isn't made aware of it at all. So the slight pop-up is an alert that yes, you're plugged in. Some of the smarter built computers also will differentiate between headphones and headsets (with a ...


0

In Britain, at least, there are architectural/plumbing issues in the past that we had to deal with. This guy explains it better than I could: https://youtu.be/HfHgUu_8KgA


0

Seriously – are you asking for a site review here? Well – here's my two cents: the site looks like somebody took a standard theme and put minimum effort in editing it. there is almost no 'real' content – that makes 'reviewing' your site even more difficult. I would suggest you spend some time working on your site! Then, if you have a specific question ...


1

I would divide it in public and private. BTW I'm not aware of mobile conventions (maybe top buttons should be inside a hamburger menu to save space or to have 1 control with all the possible actions in that page). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups An alternative would be to make the "Choose participants dialog" a ...


0

You didn't specify how much elements nav will contain. It's important because if there will be over 50 links stuffed in small navigation with minimal space between them, it may be a usability disaster. Based on my experience there are no difference what kind of presentation you use provided that you do it right. The most safest option is to keeping it ...


3

The example you're providing might work well if you have the space for it, but something like Chosen could work even better. In the example below, Chosen is the version on the right: This should also be rather intuitive to users, since this is how e.g. email clients behave when adding recipients.


2

You could use chat bubbles in a horizontal list (which is technically a tab) like on the facebook messenger app, with a small number within a circle to indicate the amount of unread messages Here's a chat plugin i found quite user friendly. Even being quite feature heavy, it seems easy to use. might give you some ideas www.spot.im


5

One thing I’ve seen more websites doing is changing the mouse cursor to the "help" style: Try it on W3Schools. This real-time change can help a lot because it lets users know that the area where they have the mouse is special. This is best combined with redundant display options that detect the user’s situation and show the tooltip in a way that’s going ...


2

The examples you give are all achievable using first order set logic without the need for nested operations. They can be described using a form with 3 simple fields: Using this interface, the set operations you describe can be created as follows (click image to expand): If you also need nested operations, this is also doable...leave a comment and I ...


1

I can't really see the difference between this and a boolean rule/query builder, e.g. like the one described here. Let's use cars and look at your examples: Include red trucks. Include red cars and trucks as long as they're of Chevrolet make. Include red Chevrolets and Chevrolet trucks, but exclude vintage cars. download bmml source – ...


0

personally i like the IDM tool-tip. you can let the first tool-tip appears automatically . then you can navigate with arrows or buttons . however every time there should be a way to backup and a exit form the tool tip. because for a experienced user of your application might get irritated. and now a days newly updated Firefox browsers use this type of ...


2

There are some sound answers here but I would like to add to it by saying that if you are that dependent on users reading what is in your tooltips, it perhaps should not belong in tooltips, but already visible for your user.


1

Long-press is akin to a context menu and is predominantly used in Android. In iOS I have only seen Long Press in WhatsApp. Its good as one gets more real estate on top of existing ones. But yes it is not very intuitive and needs a bit of discovery. But I guess a little bit of discovery and learn-ability is inevitable. Also Long-press is more heavy on ...


13

Observations Browser implementation of tooltips is not predictable. Some browser show tooltips immediately, and some show them after a delay. The position and styling of the tooltips is not predictable across different browsers. Users often miss native browser tooltips because (1) they are small; and (2) most browsers require users to pause the cursor ...


9

There's a simple and classic solutions for this. You just add a tiny icon letting them know there's a helpful tooltip waiting for them: There a are many occasions where you want to help first time or rare users, but you don't want to clutter the screen with lengthy explanations. Tooltips are a greta solution, but as you mentioned, many people are not ...


0

There are a few ways to approach this. Consider an intro tutorial for the first time a user interacts with the application. It could quickly show them what they can do and how to do it. Check out toggl, new users are given a tutorial on how to do everything. The down side to this of course is that it may mean your application may be too complex and you may ...


1

Just an idea that might help or give an other perspective. Old conventions are often intuitive until the point where your target audience is to young to remember. Analog clocks work by rotating the wheel, just one wheel. You have to keep turning it until you reached the right time. Intuitive? Most likely, but efficient? Not really. To perhaps make it more ...


1

App design is new as a profession so I have borrowed wisdom from a much older profession for getting design perspective: method acting. User stories, psychographics, and personas are very common approaches to the initial/ideation phase of app design. I've found that they are helpful descriptive approaches, but I've found it more powerful to spend time ...


0

Why? Because of all sorts of reasons outside of UX. But I'd ask the reverse...why would you have both a temperature and quantity option? When showering, there usually isn't a gradient of amount. It's either on or off. No real need for a spectrum there. As for temp, temp is created by adjusting the individual amount of cold and hot. In otherwords, the ...


1

I think the following activities can help to expand the perception of every UX professional: Usability testing (as much as you can) Constant research (new studies, trends, recognized blogs, etc) Participating in communities like this! Knowing your app use cases.


3

You're right in not making decisions based upon your own assumption. What you could do is usability testing with actual people. The best test would be conducted with 5-7 (or more) testpersons from the actual targeted audience in an environment they will be using the app or at least in an environment where they are comfortable. If you don't have time to ...


2

If you mean apps to use in your development, yes, there are many commercial and pretty good tools like AppSee, Heatmaps.io and so on. I don't know and I doubt there's anything free other than free trials for those commercial apps. If you mean research, there's a lot scattered around the web. The old and classic mobile UX research by Mozilla is always a good ...


0

I had a very similar task to filter a set of data in 6 dimensions. First it is essential to understand the data and the possible filter combinations. Is there some hierarchy, specific order of filters, which may lead to a "lock" of filters? (example: adding filters, then removing a filter "in between"). To give an interactive experience on "building" a ...


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They don't any more. They used to because it is the most mechanically simple implementation of temperature control. However, this is only historical. None of the other answers mention the legalities of this. The International Building Code (what most US local codes are modeled on these days) mandates that all new shower controls must be temperature ...


-1

It is funny that there are so many answers to this question without getting one that has to do with the actual function of a shower valve. Let's go over the 3 examples that we have as examples already: 1. This shower system has electronic mechanisms to calibrate the temperature and flow. The pros include easy user interface, looks cool (maybe because ...


1

In Australia, most showers have separate hot and cold knobs, and the more modern remainder are 'mixing batteries' like what tillinberlin describes. There are some big UX problems with hot/cold taps: When turning on the shower it takes time to adjust the taps to get the right temperature and pressure. People must be taught to turn on the cold tap first and ...


3

I found it very amusing reading all these answers which I assume were written by people in the US. I live in the UK and visit France and Spain very regularly. I believe a resident of any of these countries would be appalled to find a hot/cold shower in a hotel room in Europe - I have not seen such a thing for many years. All the talk about the the ...


0

This question assumes that “temperature” and “quantity” knobs are easier to use. And yes, those types of controls are easier to use for me at least, but for my elderly mother, those types of controls have never been easy to use. My mother could never tell which knob was for pressure and which knob was for the temperature. Part of the problem I think is ...


2

Some systems in South America (called "calefón" in my country) require certain level of pressure to get the hot water running (for example, you can turn the knob 30º without the "calefon" getting activated in order change the water temperature), so in that case it's a device limitation.


17

I can honestly say I have never seen a shower that has separate hot/cold knobs like you describe, and I've lived everywhere up and down both the east and west US coast. Every shower I've ever seen has two concentric wheels. The inner one controls temperature while the outer one controls pressure. Here's what they look like (although the labels around the ...


97

You are totally right As with many other devices (eg the QWERTY keyboard) the hot/cold tap persists not because it's the most usable design, but because of: Cost since proper temperature control requires an electromechanical feedback loop design, or calibrated thermostatic valves which needs to be periodically adjusted or replaced. This drives up the cost ...


28

I suppose it's mostly a question of how much money you want to invest into your fittings. In most cases you'll have one pipe for hot and one for cold water. The knobs then just open and close those pipes – I can hardly think of any easier / cheaper solution. However there are actually different solutions that do exactly what you describe: Visiting Canada ...


11

Hot and cold knobs work great, and everyone intuitively understands that turning the knob makes more water come out, ie more water pressure. The practical reason is it gives maximum control with the fewest parts. Also, the range for usable water pressure is not very large, and dedicating an entire knob to it seems to be a waste. Your solution would require ...


2

I think Facebook login (or any firm login) should not be mandatory. eCommerce is all about trust. Your users may trust your firm, but may not trust Facebook or others. Therefore, making firm's login mandatory may lead to a customers loss. On the other hand, some users would appreciate not to have to fill once more the usual personal fields. In this view, ...


1

I think Interaction Design1 offers quite a solid classification. Evaluation strategies include: User testing - any method that requires users. This includes controlled lab experiments, interviews, questionnaires, user observations, field observations, remote testing, etc. Inspections - done by experts, largely by means of reason. Includes cognitive ...


0

I would think about it in this way: Source of information: if you are looking for existing knowledge or information, or extending existing knowledge or information then it is a research activity. If you are generating new information or repeating existing procedures or protocols then it is a testing activity. Person conducting or carrying out the activity: ...


0

this is for a student project so I am just looking for ideas on how data from all of the requirements gathering and evauations are collated, there does not seem to be a set format


4

Don't do it There are several reasons: Pull-to-refresh is a very common mobile UX idiom. You are asking users to unlearn the idiom and learn some other behavior in its place, which is going to feel unintuitive at best and annoying at worst. You are asking the user to slide vertically to delete horizontally, which is going to feel very weird since there ...


1

I don't think deleting letter by letter is a good thing : User doesn't want to pull for 10s if he wrote a long word/sentence. Besides, the idea to coming back few step backward by deleting some characters in the search is nice, just do it according to the size or syllabe by syllabe. EDIT : Don't forget to add a simple visual content to make the gesture is ...


0

Why not have a sticky search button somewhere within the UI? (preferably at the bottom so the users can tap it faster)



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