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1

I am also working on a financial application and we use a similar setup. For new persons who register by physically showing up at the financial institution branch, we send them out both a temporary username and a temporary password - via different channels. For eg. we would send a temporary username to the person's email address and the temporary password as ...


0

The idea of asking for partial number of characters is good but the user will tend to copy the password from the mail and will paste here. A partial input will make the user work more and i guess that is not required. In the other way around, if you get the mail id from the user while signing up, you can mail him/her a link which will ask them for the ...


1

There are a few strategies that can help you with deep hierarchies, some demonstrated in this screenshot (source): Hierarchical sidebar Probably the most useful one of all May involve 1 or more sub levels Tabs Limited vertical space could be an issue, specifically with dynamic tabs Vertical stack (scroll) Would be tabs are unfolded to panels ...


1

Representing the entire site schema in one page is a bit like search, as mentioned above, or an old-style site map page. Is this meant to be a guide to the site, or working sitewide navigation? If it's the latter, you could display the top levels (0-4) in the mega-nav and the lower levels in section nav. If the sections are really deep, you might want a ...


3

Both the options are good but Tree navigation is recommended. My suggestion would be add the search box above the tree navigation to access the menu item quickly. User can type 3 letter in the search box to get the respective page link.


1

From the 2. the tree navigation option seems the better choice. I'd add accordion behaviour(expand/collapse) to the navigation so unused elements of the menu will be hidden. Also, having breadcrumbs will give the user a sense of where they are on the application. You could also have selectable elements in the breadcumbs to allow the user to jump between ...


1

Remember what metrics are really used for - to gauge the direction and magnitude of change, not the actual UX. That is to say, all metrics are just different pieces of information that the UX designer can use to try and work out if the design changes introduced have the desired impact on the user experience. However, as with any change, it can also affect ...


2

A more advanced user of Google Analytics may know of methods that I am not aware of, but I can speak from my experience here: GA will allow you to (fairly easily) track behaviour trends, including all the things you mention in your question. Some work out of the box, others would require use of the "Event Tracking" tools. However, GA seems to purposely ...


0

The closest to a UX design language I've come across is the Generic Modeling Environment research from ISIS research center at Vanderbilt University. They explore how custom, domain specific languages can be constructed that then allow for systems to be modeled from multiple perspectives. Over the past year or so they've begun porting GME to the web and it's ...


0

Addressing a case of following users, it is suitable to individually have an add/ follow button for each item as it is a case of 'socially connecting' with an individual. Just a way to add a more human touch to the process. However, this isn't a one size fits all solution. Considering the above image, it is a not so optimal arrangement of controls. One ...


1

Yes the position of icons is critical in buttons especially if you are working multi lingual applications. Having worked on web applications with Arabic as the primary language, I can tell you it is important that the right-to-left culture or vice versa is reflected in all aspects of UI, including placement of icons.


1

It is not something that I have seen. One thing to keep in mind is that if you implement an uncommon feature on your site then you're asking users to learn a new mechanic and are increasing their cognitive load (perhaps unnecessarily). If it's only 2 categories, why not just have them both expanded from the start? If there were numerous categories I could ...


1

A very nice answer to a similar question is answered by @Emerson Rocha Luiz Why is it common practice to send newsletters from fake email addresses? Copying and pasting the content as per policy. 5 reasons of why use fake emails Most emails from mail marketing are from some automatic tool or 3rd provider. These tools sometimes do not have easy way to ...


1

Standards for wait times Microsoft has published standards for what your software can/must do during the first few seconds of wait time. You can begin reading the guidelines under the heading Is this the right control on this page (about progress bars) in the Microsoft Windows UX Guidelines. Please disregard that this topic is about progress bars, since ...


0

Why do designers do this? Concealing information in this manner helps designers display content in a way that's manageable and complies with relevant theories on how users seek/consume content. Is it good UX? Yes, see: Information scent Studies show that users will continue to search (read: click through) for information that is more rewarding than it is ...


0

Another reason for a Read More button is to allow the site to show an advert within the body of the article without creating a "false floor", which may lead users on mobile devices to erroneously believe the article to have ended. http://www.nngroup.com/articles/ad-placement-mobile/


0

Somthing no other answer has mentioned. Out of office emails When sending huge amounts of emails (more so for marketing emails than receipt type emails) there are a lot of messages coming back these can be tricky to filter as there is no standard email reply and word based filtering gets you some false positives


0

Scams (aka Phishing) This trains users not to trust a reply-to address as a vehicle for contacting the company. If you want to contact the company, visit their site manually or look up their phone number. Teach users that it's weird for official e-mails to contain contact information. Once they get used to this, they are at far lesser risk of getting ...


1

In the scenario you are proposing (drag and drop items from a long list), several factors must be taken into account. Every factor might present potential hurdles to the user. On screen real estate: is the target easy to reach? Check Fitt's Law. List item size. Unwanted scrolling: when reaching the bottom of the screen, the screen will start scrolling ...


0

A quick example of one of the possible problems - Suppose, you have a long list or say a visual from editor where all the sections are not being covered on the screen on current resolution of the system, then it will be difficult for the users to select a particular section and reorder them. Specially, when one will realize or need to scroll the mouse along ...


0

If we want to convey that a match will expire then showing timer is ok. The UI looks ok, add some sort functionality in the UI so that it's easier for the user to review data based on a specific set of parameters - by expiring time, by last seen time... etc. That will solve confusion to a greater extent The data should be sorted on the basis of who expires ...


12

As someone working in customer support, which of the following would make it easier for you to decide which mails you answer, which you forward to the technical staff, and which ones you ignore? If you got these e-mails to your contact address: Please implement feature X, we really need it! I bought product Y from you but it doesn't work Wow i liked the ...


2

Actually, there is one, but it's not what you think. Generally speaking, a no-reply e-mail is an anti-pattern. In my career, I've seen one example where two companies didn't use no-reply e-mails, and things went south. It's not a good reason to use no-reply e-mails, but certainly something you should consider when using support tools instead. Consider ...


1

Perceived lag = latency + framerate Response timings described by Nielsen is something different than perceived lag. While waiting for a page to load, user is expecting to see some delay and is not providing any constant input. While drawing a picture, user is providing constant input and is expecting immediate response. User is going to notice lag ...


1

I think this screen definitely needs a timer on a matchlist because users will be unpleasantly surprised when matches suddenly start to disappear without some sort of time tracker. The problem with the clock is that it is normally associated with hours or precise time (like an alarm clock), and here it represents all kinds of units: days, hours, minutes. I ...


6

This is a complex situation and I feel like a lot more info is needed. However, there's a part where an answer can be provided, and it's whether to mix (or not) the times. And the answer is NO. Check your own screen capture: you have 22h, then 14d and even 13m. And according to your description, these times are measuring different actions (one is for a ...


1

If it would be possible to usefully handle most of the kinds of replies people would likely sent in response to automated notifications, such capability will often provide a better user experience than any form of no-reply email. If, however, usefully handling such replies would not be practical, having an automated notification explicitly disallow direct ...


2

One potential reason that I didn't see in the other answers is that the original email may contain sensitive information (perhaps an account number or something). Making it so that the reply goes nowhere could prevent this information from being inadvertently left in as part of an email chain.


-4

The sole purpose of sending No-Reply emails is to convey important messages, information, balance sheet of a company to share holders... It is only to convey, it is one sided and does not need any answer from the receiver and there is no need for the receiver to reply for that email. If at all any doubts arise, there are other ways of communication to the ...


2

From my experience developing e-commerce sites I know a little bit about how this happens. Rather than looking at how 'Amazon do it' in some ideal scenario we need to look at how it has happened with real small/medium sized businesses in the last few years. Imagine a bricks and mortar business with some office server running some 'Exchange' thing so that ...


1

The no-reply can be beneficial to the user. The system used by a company might be sending these emails from a bot inbox which won't reply. Not having the no-reply, might allow the user to think that he can just reply to the email where he/she will not get a reply.


0

Many apps use a second screen for advanced options, usually accessed by pressing a button at the bottom of a screen with basic settings. At least, that is the most popular option on android and windows. I'm not sure if apple has a different standard, but from what I've seen during short uses of iphones and ipads, it's mostly the same. It might be a good ...


24

Personally, I find this really annoying and really bad UX. There is a large music equipment online store in Europe, which does it differently, and I always enjoy interacting with them. When you reply to an invoice, you do not get just customer-care@whatever.example or billing@whatever.example, no, you actually get a direct email to the customer support ...


1

From a UX perspective - the perspective where the recipient of the 'no-reply' email is the centre of the universe: No, there is no good reason as people are used to replying to emails (some will try anyway) and clearly this would be the easiest way to raise any concerns they have at the point they have just finished reading the email. Intentionally making ...


0

Is there any UX reason to send invoice like e-mails from no-reply addresses? Clarification to the customer comes to mind. The customer recognizes it's generated by a computer and not by some division of the company. Although this computer may or may not be part of the 'Customer Care' division, this is of no relevance to the customer.


71

It might not have many UX reasons... ... but it is benefical for the company. I start with companies that have a large community, for example amazon. They have 244 million users and therefore many e-mails to send and to reply to. Most of the sent e-mails probably are automatically generated shipping confirmations telling you not to reply, because this ...


7

Think of it this way, That order you just received in the mail you didn't like one little part of it, so you emailed back with some small 'issue'. Imagine how many other people are doing the same. Now imagine the effort it would take to complain about that small part if instead you had to go through a series of pages, support tickets or something along ...


3

Well, it's an anti-pattern actually as it totally disrupts the flow of any human being. I think it's something that is overused and IMHO can totally be ommited. One of the reasons I've heard was because some people (like marketeers) hate to sift through dozens of out-of-office mails. Another reason is probably because some companies apply a very rigorous set ...


1

My thought is, try implementing a way to have a swipe from the right to the left of the screen go from Basic to Advanced. It lets more advanced users know it's there without having them go into the Settings app, toggle a switch, quit out of your app, and relaunch to see the Advanced control set. Do it similar to how SnapChat's "chat" system works; in order ...


5

So the chosen answer, while good, is incorrect as regards this particular screenshot. I am actually responsible for implementing the button in the screen shot. I can't speak for every site but I can say that the thought process (as far as I know) is basically the 3rd option given by tohster. QZ only shows the read full button when you navigate directly to ...


2

In the vein of all good UX design, think about who is using it and what their goals are. If your user is a designer with several years of experience in Adobe products, they will expect more nuanced control and fine tuning, and will accept more of a learning curve. If, on the other hand, they are less experienced with design software and just want to create ...


1

It depends on the reason you are using an icon in addition to the Text. In the examples that you have mentioned, I see two different reasons why the icon has been included Icon is being used to visually represent the task. Like you have done for the Shortlist button. Over time users would recognise the icon and not need the supporting text for their ...


5

I had a similar situation when I was designing an accordion menu. here you can find the related article. For navigation items such as previous and next I would use the icon based on the direction i want to point. (right placed icon for next, left placed icon for previous). For other cases left aligned icons feels more familiar.


1

To me, it depends if it's to perform an action or for the flow. For the flow, you'd want to "point" people in a timeline direction (as with the next button, where the arrow is after the text), where it a "back button" than the arrow would be in front of it, as per convention. The position of "actionable" icons, to me, doesn't seem to affect a whole lot, as ...


17

There are a few reasons: Robot defense. Content sites (e.g. news sites) sometimes use these buttons to provide a rudimentary defense against content scrapers. By showing only part of the content they prevent scrapers from loading the page and parsing the article. This is obviously very crude, but it is still effective. Affirmation of user intent. ...


7

Quite the opposite, there are several good reasons to do it. Take a look to this article (I don't fully agree with all of it, but you'll get the gist of it) They are important for several reasons, most importantly because they allow designers to compress content on the home page. By compressing content, you fit more content in less space. This means ...


0

The UX question is about interface design. Knowing what your minimum, maximum and average results are is essential to create the right design. The reason I'm asking is that it's a question that comes up again and again in my system design so maybe others will have had the same. I think the real answer to your question has nothing to do with post codes ...


0

As always, it depends, and to me it would depend on the target audience. Our western culture reads from left to right, eye trackers will also back this up, we start at the top left, and we end our "scan" at the bottom right. Those are the place where you'd put information like logos or other stuff you think is important. In some other countries, people read ...


0

It all depends on what you're going for. In terms of straight usability the logo has to main purposes: It tells people which site they're on. Most people hit your site through search engines, so they'll be dropped somewhere on a random page of a random website. This is why the tagline, which explains what your site is, is below the logo. It functions as a ...


0

You're fine putting it in the centre, as long as there's symmetry. Take for example my own website, it uses a centre logo mainly because 1: The logo is symmetrical 2: The navigation is 3: The style allows it. Most of the time it depends on how complex your navigation is and the complexity of your theme. Minimalism tends to favour centred logos, whereas ...



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