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And yet there are times when ALL the columns are necessary - and yet there are too many to fit the available space. I've faced that problem. Hiding columns doesn't work as the data is necessary. In one example I partially solved the problem by reducing the text in some of the columns. For example the user scans the columns to know which competitor (8 ...


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You could try using 5 steps rather than 100 then a phrase like 'at least' or 'minumum available'. By only changing your graph when one of the main chunks is completely full the user will only be able to deduce that there is somewhere between (in the example) 2 and 3 chunks of space available. Your graph for either 41% of 59% would look like this. They ...


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People can remember on average between 6 and 9 things at a given time. I think this is one of the reasons why most website like Amazon and Ebay show a number of suggestions that is fairly close to this figure. You don't want to overload your user with suggestions.


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Basically the number of choices given to the users should not be too many. How much depends on what the product is and what are the suggested products. Since, here its food, the lesser number of choices the more likely that people would actually make a choice. Sheena Iyengars famous jam choice experiment talks about choice overload. " At a luxury food ...


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I like your second solution better because: Office locations are consolidated into one column for one person. This reinforces the notion that the person works out of multiple offices. Out of the possible offices, there must be a main office and sorting by the main office makes sense One idea you could consider is allowing user to have the option to ...


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I just designed multiple screens registration form in the iOS app. First we wanted to make it as single screen but then after little research I find out that it is much more comfortable for users when you split all informations in logical steps (2-3). It could be even more effective for the app developer. Let me explain. When user come to the registration ...


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If you open Chrome's console and run showModalDialog() in it, it gives you this error: Chromium is considering deprecating showModalDialog. Please use window.open and postMessage instead. That makes it pretty obvious what the way to implement an exact replacement should be: use window.open(url) to open a popup window. postMessage is part of a Chromium ...


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Google does not support ShowModalDialog anymore, but it does not mean that you can't use modal popup anymore. Many javascript libraries/frameworks will provide you with modal popup. Bootstrap for example provide a modal popup example here: http://getbootstrap.com/javascript/#modals Modal popup can still be part of a good UX, the pattern of modal popup is ...


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I've had a thought about this in the past. First, consider a highly unscientific experiment I just did on myself (it doesn't have ethics board approval). If I go to the home screen on my iPhone 5 and casually swipe upward from above the "dock" (a gesture with no assigned function), the result depends on how I'm holding the phone. If I use my thumb, ...


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The design should be made in such a way that, it can perform equally well in both the case, i.e. user interacting with forefinger and user interacting with thumb. Best way to do this is, to leave enough room surrounding any action elements, so that user would not tap on wrong buttons mistakenly. Now when user controls with forefinger, his finger can ...


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Elements of User Experience is a must read. JJG's book is one of the few books I kept from college, the rest I sold. I always saw the difference as Where and How. With Information Architecture (IA) you decide what the logical place is for certain pieces of information. Where will the visitor look for that piece of information. Interaction Design is about ...


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Information Architecture - IA - in a literal way tells how the the information is architectectured or arranged or designed on any application. Ideally it shows the directions for a user to reach to a specific location containing the info user is looking for. And for that there are several things like - navigation, controls, signs, - which account for the ...


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A simpler way to look at the difference between the two would be to view Information Architecture as the part of the structure relevant to the content of the interface, whereas Interaction Design is part of the structure relevant to the flow/transition of the interface. I would have actually swapped Information Design with Information Architecture on this ...


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I am not aware of any books or articles, but I do have a few thoughts on principles. I would look more at the tasks that the user is performing rather than the type of interface that is being built. For example, which of the columns on this page will the user need to quickly skim before choosing which one to read/edit next? Or does the user review each row ...


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thank you for your answers, I can't vote up yet but the answers were both great and I have made a few amendments to the site in general. Please do let me know if you like / or don't like what you see. Interestingly, changing Products to This month's recipes are pushing people into the products page. Then when users go into all recipes they don't stay on the ...


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MFC/Visual C++ has Pushbutton like radio buttons. I think this could be the right answer for you. Imagine the MS Word buttons for Align to left Align to centre Align to right Justified all not pressed and you have the unset state you are talking about.


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If you have only two items, I can suggest a toggle switch like the O/I of Android.


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Two things I can suggest to improve that interface: Eliminate that lines between rows and use a different background colour for even and odd lines. The contents of sorting column should have a highlighting, like, marking it with a different colour in the background or changing some attributes of the text, like boldness / font, etc. UPDATE: U3. Make the ...


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Mosaic Interface Since "tiled" implies regularity, I'd call that a "mosaic" interface to include tiles of various sizes/orientations.


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I've not specifically heard it used for UI but I think the word to describe it is "tesselated": Wikipedia article (includes many forms of tessellation/tiling) Google Image Search If someone said a UI was using "tesselated irregular tiles", I'd understand a Win8/Flickr photostream/Pinterest type layout.


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When I first saw your old page my eyes scanned the links "how it works" and "Products" before hitting the logo. That indicated the end of the navigation for me and I went down to the "Get started" section. Looking at the new site my eyes scanned "Products" and "Recipes" and I since that was what I expected on a cooking site, I felt the urge to click ...


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I have a few more questions to get a better understanding of the user activity. In the previous design, of the users that clicked the 'Get Started' button, did a majority complete their purchase or navigate to other pages within the site? After going to the recipes page, are users proceeding to the 'Get Started' (order) page? What percentage of users view ...


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I recently tackled a similar problem, and this is what I came up with: The basic search box works in realtime for queries containing the search terms entered. Clicking the Advanced Search button bring up the second dialog where users can enter more complex searches like date ranges or things that don't contain a search term. The input fields vary based ...


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It's the symbol representing a paragraph - which is what you do when pressing ENTER. You use this mode to see what formatting you have in a word document do make a flawless formatted word document. You can deselect this using the button with the same symbol in the ribbon, like this:


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Look in the Home tab in the Paragraph tools. The same paragraph symbol should be there, just click on it to deactivate it. These symbols indicate a new paragraph on screen but not in print.


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Mathematically speaking, flipping an image is the same as scaling it by a negative factor. Many drawing applications (e.g. Illustrator, SketchUp) let you flip an object in this way-- you scale the object to zero, and then keep going out the other side. The pinch gesture could be made to work this way, although it could be somewhat tricky to do with one ...


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When our sales people asked for a feedback mechanism in our TV app to determine our net promoter score, we went through this thought process as well. We identified a few objectives: Don't interrupt anything the user might be doing at the moment. Make it trivial to click away/ignore for users that are annoyed. Be concise, short and polite. Don't produce a ...


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A lot of your bullet point depend on the design and intention of the website or app. Like for instance "interaction: revealed on a page or as a pop-up". This depends on the design. Is there room for a feedback form or a label that will take people to a feedback form. The same goes for design. The message and tone of the feedback request depends on the ...


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I'm not going to go deep into details, mate. Current screenshot does look a bit overwhelming. Yes, I would add an initial step with options like "Import" or "Manual". 1) "Import" option would link to the Import Form that would also include a subtle link "Go to manual form" 2) Upon filling in the Import Form and clicking "Continue" I'd send user to the ...


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I always like to support the most common behavior as much as possible, then treat the secondary behavior as an alternative to that. For example, if most users send to a work group, then show that option in the form by default. Add a little link or toggle to change the form to allow for send-to-individual. This saves most of your users from stopping to make ...


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How about graying out (disabling) both the inputs until the user has selected one or the other mode (via radio button)? Then you enable the appropriate additional element(s). That way, the user can see "what's coming up" without actually being able to enter anything, and can plan their course of action better (they can see what data they'll be asked for once ...


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Instead of an error list, place each error by its UI control If the errors and warnings you refer to are all related to UI elements on the screen somewhere, then it would be useful to have all the errors located by the UI elements they relate to; so if there's a problem with the third checkbox in the seventh tab, put the warning by that checkbox. The ...


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I guess with any content and interaction with the user, you can take either one of two approaches. The first is to show what is required to resolve any issues that will impact on the user's workflow, and allow them to discover additional details as required (progressive disclosure). The alternate approach is to show everything upfront and reduce the content ...


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I thing that the solution depends heavily on your application design and visual architecture. However what i can think of is a kind of a variation of the error list from VS. If there're errors you could have a notification on the top of the window: Which could then be expanded if needed: When user clicks on one the item on the list, he gets navigated ...


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I have seen this done many times with a message console window within the app (like your visual studio screenshot). If you want to go down this route, but don't want to take up space by having the message console always visible, you could keep it hidden by default (can be opened from the view menu), and display a toast alert to notify the user of an error / ...



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