New answers tagged

0

I Agree with Daniel Brown when he says that "it's important that you know the persona you're developing for" Case in point: I am working on a similar problem, though my end users manipulate hierarchical data to verify its quality before importing it to a database so calls to action are quite different.This being said, I think the solution I am working on ...


1

Your hierarchy reminds me of the nested hierarchy of parent and nodes in iOS development(Xcode) interface. I have a windows machine and this is not to compare the two but from a pure user experience point of view, I find checkboxes quite confusing when there are too many children in the list. If you could highlight the selected child after selection, it's ...


1

Hmm.. The only UI that comes immediately to mind is the "Turn Windows features on or off" dialogue. You can see similar UI during advanced software's install process. It is similar your application in that: List of nodes Nodes can have children All nodes are "selectable" Note that different icons are used when all versus not all children are selected. ...


1

The Problem isn’t Having the Right Control For the purposes of visually adjusting a curve shape, any of your solutions (wheel, slider, buttons) sound adequate to me. The wheel is probably best because it is direct manipulation, and, as your testing revealed, users seem able to drag to the exact slope they want -it’s just that the curve doesn’t comply. The ...


1

The best I can think of is for you to use a logarithmic scale for the slider. They're not as uncommon as I thought - this Form Usability guide for Slider Interfaces recommends them for e-commerce sites. They also point to some example sites, of which Lens Hawk seems to have an implementation along the lines of what you're looking for. You effectively ...


1

My theory is that it's a way to improve their bounce rate. If an organization is obsessed with metrics, they start to think of up ways to lower their bounce rate. In this case, when users click on the Read More link triggers an event in Google Analytics and doesn't count against the bounce rate. Just a theory, I don't have anything that confirms that.


4

You should not do this. Users know about the back button. "The Back button is the lifeline of the Web user and the second-most used navigation feature (after following hypertext links)". Jakob Nielsen in 1999. Or a Firefox study in 2010: "Across Windows, Mac and Linux 93.1 percent of users clicked the button at least once over the course of a five-day ...


1

"How do I make it so that the images look like you can interact with them by clicking on them?" Answer: You don’t. This answer is already given by @dan1111 but I like to add the following: Is it really an issue? Then rethink your navigation. If you don’t use this as “functional" navigation, then there is no real issue here as long as the "real" ...


3

As per our friends here at UX.SE, I suggest using a drop shadow. It perhaps relies on the fact that it's surrounded by links anyway - but they indicate that there is something 'special' about the image by adding a drop shadow. This is not hugely different from Michael Zuschlag's answer, but turning an image into a button didn't feel right. A drop ...


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People sometimes get confused between whether it actually goes back in browser, or goes back to a preset page, for example if it just links to another page that the website thinks you've visited.


-1

I think placing a in page back button will not harm your usability. In fact it will support novice users which are still unaware of the browsers back button. It will surely not harm your website, it can only improve it.


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I mostly agree with adamsoh. Some audiences may need more 'spoon feeding' than others to navigate around though. In which case I would consider offering some extra on-screen navigation. If you’re worried the site may need that ‘back button’ there’s a good chance your gut feeling is correct.


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If your intention is to duplicate the exact same feature as the browser back button, then I would say a customize back button is a bit redundant. I can think of situation whereby a customize back button would be problematic. Say you access a subpage via url or bookmark, then the back button makes no sense at all. You also risk confusing the users on their ...


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You should NOT rely on hover states. Even if you’re not developing a responsive website, now that we have touch devices, the days of relying on hover states to imply "interactability" are gone. I think you have 3 options here: 1. As long as you don't have other animations, subtle movement is all you need to draw attention to the UI elements—and a user will ...


11

Movement might provide you with an option. The human eye is so attuned to it that it need only be subtle. On completion of the page load you could consider a rolling increase in image size and shadow depth on each image, across the chevron from right to left. This would draw a user attention in without having to "feel" the site. You then apply the same ...


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Hover-over Highlighting on hovering is worth doing, but, as you discovered, it’s not adequate by itself since the user has to make an effort to “feel” the interface to see what it can do, rather than just look at it. Hover effects also don’t do much for tablet users. “Rectangular Arrows” If you’re sure the problem is the non-rectangular shape, then work ...


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NNG Has a great article on Making Clickable Elements Recognizable specifically for images: Ensure smaller images enlarge when clicked. Make all elements (e.g., picture, icon, text) that are associated with each other clickable. Doing so increases the target size and improves the probability of capturing an intended click. Avoid multiple calls to ...


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These images simply don't look like navigation (as you admit) and won't be perceived as such. Users just don't expect oddly shaped images to be clickable. I don't think there is any magic solution to overcome that. It may be worth rethinking your design in order to better conform to user expectations rather than trying to put a band-aid on the problem. ...


0

Both are front-ends, but for different kind of customers of yours. One is for your customer who would use your website to make an order or buy, another one for the the customer who would use your website to fullfil an order or sell. What you need to guard against is Both have different user profiles and task profiles, Both have different frequency of ...


0

This is one of the best example for snappy UI. But, there is risk involved with this approach. In general user tend not to wait for more than half a second for navigation. With this mental model, expanding a tab and activating contextual buttons/actions should be handled carefully. This could be effectively achieved by distinct visual design, ...


1

I wouldn't advise doing that. User usually perceive an expanded list of options to be a drop down menu. Sideways menu might throw them off. Implementation could be challenging too especially if your app needs to be responsive. You probably have to be extra careful when you placed additional components beside the 3 buttons.


0

If this person is doing or going to do design labors and you have time to spare (you'd be the first) and she can manage the workload... then it's fine. I've done it myself and is not an impossible task, just time consuming.


2

Same person? Ideally, but nearly impossible to pull off as nearly any software project of even moderate size requires a rather diverse team. Same entity? Absolutely. The ability to create a great UX is as much about the back end as it is about the front end. This is true both for pure UI work (consumer facing UI vs. admin facing UI) as well as the product ...


0

If your goal is to increase the clicks for "Link4" you could do two things: Contrast the "Link4" button against the others by making the background color different - for example orange or green provide good affordances. Move "Link4" to the leftmost or rightmost position. People can easily spot the first and last option in a list. In this case visual search ...


3

Network effects become obvious as you see your own network in the system grow. Give them reasons to play with User X. Some of these may not apply/may not be allowable depending on your game, but: If the game is competitive, share the top score or last score. If the game is cooperative, share the name of the last teammate they played alongside. Include ...


2

I found an article which was published on February 20, 2012 written by Jason Mick (blogger) "Neonode Patented Swipe-to-Unlock 3 Years Before Apple" Neonode -- a small Swedish phone manufacturer was the first to deploy the technology commercially.  And it also appears to be the first to have patented swipe-to-unlock. U.S. Patent No. 8,095,879. The ...


3

The gesture goes back at least to 2009, when it was already being used by Apple and Google, and especially Palm (webOS). I Googled ‘swipe to delete’ and restricted the results to pre-2010. I learned that the iPhone had it in Mail, while Gmail’s mobile app had ‘swipe to archive’. But, as far as I can tell, swipe-to-perform-an-action was used most extensively ...


0

If you do not handle e-mail confirmation expiration, someone could register with someone else's e-mail address and never confirm it which would lock the e-mail of the legitimate user if he ever wants to register to your website. If the user hasn't confirmed his e-mail address in the given length of time, you want to make it available again, ...


1

If clicking the verification link automatically logs the user in, then yes, the verification link should expire. Why? Because if the user's inbox is compromised a hacker can search for the verification email and then click the verification link to gain access to the user's profile on the website. The question then is, when should the link expire. Maybe not ...


6

1. Prove your app is awesome This may be obvious, but it's the critical first step. Before asking anyone to risk their social capital, show users why their friends will thank them for the invite. Let them enjoy something about the experience, build rapport with them, convince them that it's going to be fun with other people. It also doesn't hurt to build ...


1

I think you're on the right track but what's missing and what would make this really useful is for the design to empahise key metrics I've attached a comp This is a pattern I've seen elsewhere and addresses the use case "I have a loan amount in mind and I want to see over how many months I would need to pay it back at a rate I can afford" and brings the ...


1

There are several reasons to not add a tooltip that says 'Click...': It adds no reason for the user to take an action. It provides no context. They can click anywhere on the screen at any time. Why should the be interested in clicking that particular link? What is special about it? It's non-standard approach for prompting a user to take an action on a ...


0

The call to action doesn't have to be directly under the link. Consider another option, to include a banner on top of the menu that links to the same page as link 4. Doesn't block the sub navi links.


0

I think a red (or another strong color) circle before or after the link label would be sufficient to draw attention, but since the stakeholders thought of text bubbles, they might want something more appealing to the user. In this case, I'd use a corner ribbon with a strong color and contrast between the background and the text color, or animate the button ...


1

From professional experience, I'd recommend two categories: create and search. If you want to view, edit, or delete something, your average user will first need to search for it. If you give all 5 options: search, view, edit, delete, and create; it's unclear the order of actions the user must take. Do I go to the delete page, then the search page for an ...


0

I think in this example a simple responsive(!) table with a fixed header would be the best option. Left column shows the AC model name, right column the running costs. This probably works well as long as you only have one name-value data pair, but it gets worse as soon as you try to add more columns - especially on small screens in portrait mode.


0

A simple way is to give the user an option to insert what's more confortable for him, like: ( ) Male ( ) Female ( ) Other: [Text field] -- if selected, opens the field below: -- How do you want to be called: [list to choose: Mr, Ms, 'no need for that', etc.] What do you think about this? :)


3

In a comment you say you're asking for male/female simply so you can address them correctly. I interpret that to mean you're corresponding with them as "Dear Mr Lastname" or "Dear Ms Lastname." So you could ask for that specific information. Here in the US we sometimes see registration forms asking users to choose "Mr" or "Ms" as a title, though these days ...


2

I have answered a similar question before. http://ux.stackexchange.com/a/85487/57766 If this data is crucial, and you have to ask, use "Gender". Biological sex is too sensitive as a subject and you might steer some of the TA away if you use it.


1

You are asking a question about sex/gender initially, so I'll answer that first. To begin, what is the point of the data? How will you and your company use this data? For example, will it help identify what types of advertisements to display? Anyhow, it's always good to start with understanding why you are doing something in the first place. This will help ...


0

For excellent form UX and Ui, take a look at Typeform. We do our own forms internally and we view Typeform as the gold standard. That said, both work. I'd argue that the tagging-look is better because there's a clearer distinction between what is and isn't selected. Checkboxes are also harder to click, and spending the time to build it so selecting the ...


0

Both the above answers are great. I will add that when possible I add extreme edge cases to my test panels. A trick I learned by accident. I was testing a mobile banking app for business people. I usually order panels from an agency that recruits them for us. The first bunch was mistakenly switched with a panel of non-business people for another project. ...


14

There are 3 cases. The destructive action Do you want to delete this file? Don't. Just do the action, and display a confirmation snackbar (non-blocking small widget somewhere where it is visible but not in the way of operating) that allows to cancel (then, either delay the action, or make sure you can revert it easily). The question can only be ...


8

I'm a big proponent of not showing messages blocking users from doing what they intended to do. The UX solution with confirmation popups came from the Stone Age of computer UX practices. It originates from a correct assumption that if we have a critical resource, we should not let users damage it by an accident. However, an accident is called that way ...


27

I'm surprised nobody brought up the Mac OS X shut down dialog. It presents you with an "Are you sure?" window, but has a timer so that if the user walks away, expecting the computer to have shut down, it will while still allowing the user time to cancel.


135

Yes. There is a very simple, effective heuristic that adjusts to the preference of each user. Place a check box in the warning message dialog that says: Don't show this message again Which can be improved further by stating where that dialog can be reenabled.


0

I'm fond of applying Steve Krug's maxim "Recruit loosely and grade on a curve". If you can't find your ideal users feel free to recruit other folk, but apply more weight to the feedback of people who are closer to your target group.


60

These are Confirmation messages - Windows have a fairly detailed page on their guidelines. The whole of that page is pretty useful but here's some excerpts (emphasis mine): Confirmations are most useful when the action requires the user to make a relevant and distinct choice that can't be made later. That choice often involves some element of risk that ...


0

How about putting each section inside a dropdown menu so only one section show sin full at a time, it will reduce clutter drastically and allow the user to find what he/she needs fairly quickly


1

Based on the UI attached, I'm assuming that you are toying with the idea of progressive disclosure; meaning some form of user activation to reveal the items that are available. There are circumstances whereby progressive disclosure would fit slightly better, such as form filling, check out process etc. In this case (a menu), a progressive approach would ...



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