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3

First off, I prefer calling it a 'navicon', helps me to avoid hunger issues during working hours. Secondly, not all of your points are actually about the hamburger icon (3 & 4). The other ones are more about the navigation drawer in general. Anyways, let's commence.. People tend to show a lot of options with them. A lot of options isn't going to be ...


0

A brief excursus into this symbol's history: it was designed by Norm Cox for the Xerox Star console, in 1981. http://gizmodo.com/who-designed-the-iconic-hamburger-icon-1555438787 ...


1

Definitely sample 2 — it's much more economical in terms of real estate (doesn't waste space like sample 1). I don't see much clutter provided by the sample 2 but if you are worried about non-matching amount of rows, I'd merge Street and House number to eliminate one row in the right table. Many vendors do it, allowing one common entry form for both of ...


0

Material Design concept can probably help you. Its principle of layout by priority action which principal behavior is to have shadow between layout to show user what is over what help to differentiate object and add affordance http://www.google.com/design/spec/material-design/introduction.html So add little shadow at your button make is interactive by ...


0

It sounds like your dad is at least familiar with how to use a mouse (i.e. clicking the same link multiple times) This is a good place to start as I have seen people try and use a mouse for the first time and it is amazing how awkward a mouse can be to a first time user. This is why I think it is much easier to use the internet on a tablet for people who ...


0

One option I have seen used (depending on these icons size) is a small picture of a mouse (basically a vertically extended oval with a division on the top for the two buttons) within each image icon.


4

A few suggestions: 1. Make the Label Visually Part of the Button Labels are usually part of a button 2. Add a Light Border (optional) Highlights without necessarily adding depth 3. Group the Buttons Together Comfortably Make it feel like a group of buttons, each of equal importance 4. Use a Bolder Font Weight The icons are quite chunky, and ...


3

I agree with both Long and DesignerAnalyst that a bit of styling makes them pop more as buttons. While I like the icons in your edited version, I would suggest adding the text below the icon, for those who may not know what the icon means. Icons are great when their meanings are obvious, but I program in JQuery and Javascript everyday, and didn't ...


13

The problem is it's not flat enough Are they icons or buttons? This is a common problem with flat design (see other answers) but one possible solution I haven't seen here yet is to remove information until the only viable option is to click. Think tiles. ...And at this point it should also become obvious that </> never was a suitable icon.


2

You could also give a textual clue You could change "more information" to something more specific


5

material design is good but they're not flat perfectly. I recommend you this, my ideal flat button p/s : if you want people consider something is a button, you need provide them "label" and "icon".With these two elements, most of users will know "ah, there's a button, let's click"


8

How about using a visual cue that users are most likely used to: an underline? Below is an example with solid underline and a dashed one.


44

The problem with your buttons is that they are not raised above the background, so they don't seem clickable. I highly recommend the Material Design for details on how to choose between flat buttons and raised buttons, with exhaustive do's and don'ts. http://www.google.com/design/spec/components/buttons.html#buttons-flat-raised-buttons


7

On a mobile device, the current design trend uses this. Users have become familiar with the touch method to drill down for further information without having to be explicitly told to do so. Also, a "pointer" on a mobile device is redundant since there is never any other input device other than your fingers. Keep the simplicity and elegance of your ...


7

i thought of something like showing the first skill and let the user figure it out himself, that the others are clickable / tapable aswell (sorry I din't have much time on my hands to do this, but it may help) download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

A very good reason to put them on the right are for your users who are using screen readers. These users will hear the contents of the row and last the checkbox vs hearing a checkbox without knowing the content of the row. They then have to hear the content and backup to the checkbox if they need to select the row. For these users it is a much better ...


0

The title of your dialogue is 'Join us today'. If I encounter this on the web, I'd certainly assume that I am on a Sign Up page, and the login button would take me to the Sign In page. The two intentions of joining and signing in to an existing account are very different. I'd suggest keeping the two separate.


1

Wizards are very good ui patterns for :- 1) collecting info from user in a sequential (as well as non sequential manner) like a hotel/flight booking 2) Grouping of related input in each step like:- Product customization Name, shipping address in one step, Payment details in next step Summary and confirmation in final step. 3) It provides user ...


2

This may not be an answer to the specific question you are asking ("Any specific site, application or book...?"), but perhaps it can help... A drag-n-drop, graphical interface for Set-Manipulation should have a strong mapping of screen-geography to some aspect of the data being represented. When viewing a selection of Sets, the arrangement of those Sets on ...


2

Well in short - and I'm sure your team has come to this conclusion already - users won't be able to run all of these in one fell swoop. The closest you could get would be to mimic Excel-like functionality whereby users can add cell-level functions to manipulate the values. My gut reaction/solution: Grids. 3,000-5,000 records is a trivial amount. Minuscule ...


2

The requirements sound like a good fit for a spreadsheet-like application to me: the primary focus should be on the data - display as much info as possible about the records (5000 is not that many data, but you could use infinite scroll techniques) autofilter-like search on the data, saved searches and tick-box selection would provide the best way to ...


1

"Any specific site, application or book where I can find more about such an approach?" None I know of. Your best bet may be some Ph.D/M.Sc visualisation research thesis. To get the UX design right need to understand the Users Domain and create a model of this in the system that they can interact with. What not many people realise is that SQL is a textual ...


4

The first thing I'd recommend is to divide the inputs into digestible chunks. Make sure you're not presenting all of the open fields on one form. Bring the user's focus to one section at a time. For example, use gentle highlights or outlines on the first section, and disable or even hide the next sections. The second things I'd recommend is to acknowledge ...


3

I don't follow the current vendor-specific security-speak, but I can try to list some UX implications related to various security measures for log in dialogs: locking accounts, even temporarily (necessary against brute force password attacks) - link to the support service must be available, email notification to the user should be generated, admins have to ...


0

It is a right-handed world. It used to be that if you switched our right/left click buttons the arrow would point towards the right (opposite of the images cited). This supports that the arrow mimics a hand pointing while providing angular contrast. Without a reference, it is an extension of the desktop metaphor.


0

There are no magic pills in software design It is easy to think in terms of functions tied to elements on a screen. This is prone to wrong impressions and a failed product. While a 'mini-language' might be one approach, there are probably dozens of other approaches that might work. Software is only as effective as it's users and only as valuable as it's ...


0

The angle, the cursor is inclined at gives a better feeling of pointing something. A cursor straight at 90 degree would not provide a good effect.It provides improved appearance on low resolution screens. Also the position calculation would become a lot easier when done from the top left corner of the pixel.


0

Here is one use case to consider We have a app where we load the link page in a separate window. This is so current list view is still visible and the user can continue to monitor the list while researching the details page separately. This helps with multi tasking. Also the state of the list is not lost. Say you are scrolled down in the list. Of course I ...


0

It never hurts to show a selection of relevant information on the listing page, information that is appropriate when users are comparing between options. A single product page makes good sense for SEO and for link sharing, however you can still have a combination of unique product pages but also the ability for a product view modal on the listing page (as ...


0

Yes,couldn't agree more . Users like to achieve more thing doing less operations in any field as a matter of fact. But I tried to solve the problem with respect to the requirement , that has been mentioned in the question.


1

One should simply not use the same term for items that are not the same. Users will not understand why they get different functionality between the two instances of the term. Filtering functionality is not uncommon in apps, so many users will understand the term. For those who don't, are tooltips possible for the control, or explanatory text in the UI?


2

This is a standard verification scenario, the most common example of which is domain verification. i.e. when setting up Google Analytics a user must paste a meta tag in the homepage on the site to prove they have access. The key is to require a verification or confirmation step on Site A, and to make sure it's obvious from the interaction design that the ...


0

If you have a relationship / association with the other site you can frame them allowing your users to never "leave" your site (although in practice they do). * If you don't have an association with them then there isn't anything else you can do but write compelling copy explaining the benefits to the user for leaving and coming back. You can add incentives ...


1

Even though you will save space by combining both fields onto a single page, I would be inclined to present each field on it's own screen. The user elects to pay The user is prompted for password - the user enters password The user is prompted for OTP This way each page could have it's own intro text and help links if required. Otherwise you would need ...


1

When they enter all their details and click on pay, show them the password field as well as the OTP field. At the same time you should send the OTP to their mobile. When they click confirm or submit, they should be able to do the transaction. You are reducing the number of clicks. You are doing all operations on a single page. No complexity for the user ...


0

Don't The user wants to give their credit card info and delivery address (if applicable) and nothing else. Ecomms on mobile is already bad enough without these extra steps; think how simple a real-world transaction and then go back to this system and you'll see what I mean. you might find this link useful http://baymard.com/blog/mobile-checkout


1

Companies such as Apple and Facebook can somewhat get away with being trendsetters and dictating behaviour to their users. This is because they have such market penetration and users will spend more time using them than others. ie, if you propose a different 'Like' button behaviour on your low-traffic website than Facebook or Google+ do, then you are likely ...


1

for a first-time user, who never worked with any computer, its really confusing I don't think that's Apple's target demographic. For that matter, I don't think that, in 2014, that's any OS manufacturers target demographic. So, if accommodating that demographic results in a cluttered UI for others, it's understandable why they may omit it. As for ...


2

Without looking through the internet for help it is a steep learning curve for some new users. A massive part of Apple's product is having the support to complement it, in this case the Genius Bar, and also telephone support. I first got a macbook around 6 years ago, and I also struggled to work out how to rename a folder. I achieved this learning by ...


2

I think you're right to think about users who won't be interested in watching an intro video, as quite a bit of research suggests most users don't watch them, and even onboarding should be considered a last resort (Saks, A.M. (1994). Moderating effects of self-efficacy for the relationship between training method and anxiety and stress reductions of ...



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