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Essentially this question is about the difference between usability and user experience. User experience is about how the user feels. Improving usability by removing unnecessary cognitive load etc. is essentially removing friction from the process so things move along smoothly. However this does not automatically lead to a good user experience. Filling out ...


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If you have to read the conversations later on, if it's like a log, then I think it makes sense to left align it, it would be much more difficult if it was left/right/left aligned. That's how they do it here for instance : https://botbot.me/freenode/django/


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25 columns is just to much yes. I'm liking the second solution where you give the user control of the columns. I had a similar situation where I thought some columns were irrelevant. A quick survey told me however that most users looked at different columns effectively making every column relevant. My solution was a quick test where I let users pick the ...


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Speaking personally, I find the Posts management screen of WordPress to be pretty well organized in this respect, and considering its market share one could argue it's reasonably battle-tested: Schematically in case they ever change it: [Screen Options] [Help] Screen title [Add New] [Status Filters] ...


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This article showed up the day before yesterday and I think it could be to your liking. Summary: The guys at Zeebox, a social network for TV, used a side menu with hamburger style menu in their new design around a year ago. People loved the new design, but user engagement was down. Time on site was almost halved. They changed it back and six months later ...


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As JonW said; i think you trying to ask if it's a good idea to put it in the upper left and I think not. There are ergonomic issues with placing things there (see picture below). A swipe from left to right could work however and is a common pattern (though you should still inform the user about the whereabouts of the navigation). Placing a commonly used ...


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My guess is that your users "feel" that the application crashed because, once the still has been taken, the Accept Page substitutes the Scan Page, which implies 2 issues: it makes the screen modal with two states: the Scan Page and Accept Page, forcing the user to know the current state of the screen. You don't seem to have a clear transition from one ...


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A shot in the dark but anyways :) Image 1 is Scan page, image 2 is Accept page, image 3 is Scan page with a miniature of the recently captured image from Accept page. The basic idea is to give feedback that something is being captured (image 2) but even when the image has been taken, give feedback of what was being done and captured (image 3).


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You could combine your flash with a camera type "click" sound to indicate capture, but I don't know if your particular equipment supports sound. Perhaps there is a way that you can expand upon the flash idea though. How about making an animation that mimics a mechanical shutter closing and then opening again, something like the image below? EDIT: Since ...


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You are blending two distinct concepts here: The development of ideas and the propagation of ideas. The examples you have listed were all developed through a great deal of user research over many decades of interaction design. "Swipe" and "double click" did not emerge out of the ether, they were developed by industry leaders through an iterative process of ...


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The water faucet. (Or possibly the electric socket - see below) I read it as about interfaces to complex technical systems - the system providing clean water by means of pipes, pumps, filters etc is certainly complex. And a device to regulate volume per time of water by interaction of typically rotating an element should qualify In terms of numbers, it's ...


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Reduce learning curve by [carefully] appropriating things your audience already understands. It's not easy and it's best done with a dedicated investment in understanding your audience. Skeuomorphism is just one example. Creating convention doesn't always require a reduced learning curve. But, it is rarely achieved without a hefty investment of time, money, ...


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Before one can understand the why or how, they need to understand the what. To understand the what, people really need to understand the differences between: Convention Best Practice Standard Based on this article, here are the differences: Definitions Convention an agreement, implicit or explicit, among a group. My practice is mine alone, ...


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About the menu: I agree with Dave, that you could perhaps explore possibility to have it vertical, albeit you could gain more with simply restructuring and hoping you can fit all menu items in one row and still have only 2 levels. However, another alternative would be to have the top navigation contain only the most primary and sought after links that most ...


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I would entertain thinking slightly differently and exploring a vertical side navbar. Perhaps, provide some organization to the navigation links. Two or three categories may help the user better digest your offered nav topics. Also, the text does not need a shadow, the white on dark blue pops for pleasant reading. I hope this helps.


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Here are a few ways you can hint at this functionality: Provide an alternative method for zooming in and out via buttons - it looks like flotchart provides this functionality. By seeing the zoom in and zoom out buttons, users may simply try to pinch because that functionality is commonly associated with zooming. Same idea as above, provide an alternative ...


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This is a good question. I've been wandering if there is a better way to document interactions for over a year now and have been trialling a few different things. I've taken inspiration from a lot of different places and below are the different types of methods I've created/trialled in the past with some success. The images below show interaction with an ...


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I would design the interaction such that each task includes an optional survey that is considered part of the task. That way, randomization will not break the link between task and survey, because they are considered one unit and will always travel together.


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I think something like the link posted is best http://tympanus.net/Development/BookPreview/ Having small, unobstrusive icons or text links below the title means they are easily discoverable across all devices, because they don't rely on hover states to be visible. Paul posted this image: The second state is ideal, however it should not rely on hover ...


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So the books have two navigational options. Going to a relevant webpage Showing more options Your hover suggestion won't work on mobile. And if the "extra options" are just edit and remove I wouldn't show this on hover. People could accidentally click remove when they just wanted to navigate to a relevant page. If the extra options really are edit and ...


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With this feature, if a user leaves the title field and then clicks on it again to continue typing, they don't have to type "space" first before adding another word.


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An old and common approach is to use a button bar (you know, the thing before tool bars and ribbon bars). In terms of usability we want to reduce the mouse-movement from an item to the desired action. For this several enhancements are available out there (for sure, all with some trade-offs). Inline buttons which appears only on click on the row ...


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Why don't you have the actions show up inline? download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This will help it appear as though the actions effect each row in the data and not seem too disconnected. Also, here's a solution if you have bulk actions: EDIT: REMOVE can be handled with a bulk action as per above. FLAG can be ...



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