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1

Without looking through the internet for help it is a steep learning curve for some new users. A massive part of Apple's product is having the support to complement it, in this case the Genius Bar, and also telephone support. I first got a macbook around 6 years ago, and I also struggled to work out how to rename a folder. I achieved this learning by ...


0

I think you're right to think about users who won't be interested in watching an intro video, as quite a bit of research suggests most users don't watch them, and even onboarding should be considered a last resort (Saks, A.M. (1994). Moderating effects of self-efficacy for the relationship between training method and anxiety and stress reductions of ...


1

Every user has a timeline showing the timeslots available for allocation. The diagram shows weekdays, halfdays would probably be better for original question. Tasks for the project being planned are shown in colour; otherwise occupied timeslots are marked with grey transparent tasks. Dependencies are marked with an arrow pointing at any tasks that must be ...


1

There is an interesting article written by the Nielson Norman group which discusses the time spent reading which suggests a need for more relevant and appropriate information to retain attention. Whilst not directly appropriate to your question does back up your own experience. Nielson Norman Group Article - How little do users read? Research is thin on ...


2

Is this a native mobile app or a web app? Either way, I think it's important to give users some indication about what is happening rather than leading them hanging, so if at all possible, you should help them feel their task is complete. Whether a native app or web app, it's a fairly straightforward solution to persist the data in a native app for your ...


0

I like the idea of the column filter/chooser, but there could be even more mechanics involved for example. But above all, the user should always have control of what columns are hidden/shown prioritize (based on research/analytics) and hide less frequently used columns reveal columns based on persona / role / access level reveal columns to match to ...


1

One option would be to give the user the ability to hide one or more of the lines, and the ability to display hidden lines again. Postscript: Based on what dayluloli stated: The lines are often close together and overlap. The legend should follow the end-of-line. Thus, the lines and legend should be presented in the graph. With the four lines in the ...


0

Unless you can implement handles or some sort of indicator for the swiping actions I would leave them out. Interactions with the slider content will also get confusing. In my head you should have the off canvas menus dedicated to one thing: left one for menu items right one for shopping cart The login/register feels like it should be a modal or ...


6

A few different ideas come to mind. 1 - make the label color match the associated line color, so even if they overlap it's clear which label belongs to which line. 2 - Put each label in a containing div, possibly giving that containing div a border the same color as its associated line, with an opaque white background ... and possibly when a user ...


3

Leave the value in there as an invalid state You should allow users to change the type and still keep what they wrote in value field. They might have clicked the wrong type, or want to copy what they had written. You need to communicate that the value is invalid though so I suggest you indicate this by making the value red: When the user leaves this ...


1

To a certain degree, the system can handle the problem itself - if an integer is changed to a string, the number can be converted into a string automatically (in the image above to the string "123"). In this case no user intervention is required. If a conversion is not possible, there should be a warning message. You say, the user "can change data types ...


1

Google does a lot of testing, but that doesn't mean they've tested this issue. The use case that was described in the original post was "I use the images function on a regular basis.", so frequently that the text was no longer read, only the position of where the link is located. But location changes and causes the issue. This breaks the usability rule of ...


0

I suppose that you have a details page for each of the dishes. Most ordering will probably be done in that view rather than the thumbnailed list view. Customers generally want to reassure their decision by acquiring all available information before making a purchase (this need is of course decreased for already experienced purchases). So I would suggest ...


0

Clearly there is no use for pasting an empty string, so the only potential use would be to clear the contents of the clipboard. A programmer might have been copying and pasting very specific lines of code and want to clear his or her clipboard to ensure that those lines weren't pasted anything else. I personally wouldn't use the feature, but I could ...


34

They arrange the items depending on what you search for. I.E. searching for 'Tax' is likely to return many News results, so that is shown alongside 'web': Searching for 'Mexico Flag' is likely to return lots of images, so they set 'Images' as the next tab: Whereas searching for 'Bristol' (A city in England) returns 'maps' as the next tab: ...


1

It's platform dependent according to Nielsen Norman Group. Summary: Should the OK button come before or after the Cancel button? Following platform conventions is more important than suboptimizing an individual dialog box. That said, It's correct on Apple devices, but not OK on Android/Windows Phone devices.


0

Since you are adding more fields (more steps) to register, it'd be better to change the label on second screenshot to 'Complete Registration'.


0

Even though the width of the 'Register' and 'Login' buttons are different (to which the larger button is supposed to go with the text fields), it still implies that I can 'Register' with email address and password only. Imagine that as you fill in the form and thinking that you're done when you clicked the 'Register' button, you are then prompted for an ...


0

Button should say what they do. UXMovement has an article: Why Your Form Buttons Should Never Say ‘Submit’, which describes why providing generic terms... gives users the impression that the form isn’t focused on a specific task. It also gives off the impression that your website isn’t user-friendly because you’re speaking in a technical way that most ...


3

Be weary of mixing form buttons and navigation links. A user will likely think 'Back' button is a navigational item not a form submission. Assuming button click = server trip to save data. The confirmation page is probably the best page to put a back or 'Update' link. The summary of highlighted issues links them to areas needing respective updates. If the ...


10

Preserve the information when you can. Consider the 3 data entry pages as one big form that you happen to split into three. As the user completes one section/page, that part should be treated as completed as they move forward. If they move back, they should see what they saw when they left the page - the information that they entered/selected. You'll ...


37

Microsoft's MSDN Guidelines claim: Preserve user selections through navigation. For example, if the user makes changes, clicks Back and then Next, those changes should be preserved. Users don't expect to have to re-enter changes unless they explicitly chose to clear them. See source Rightly so, IMO.


1

Why not embed the prerequisites into the modules themselves? That way you can see all prerequisites at one place. No lines to other places, no other place to look up associations. I added one possible draft using a drop-down box for addding prereqs and an X button which will remove it again. Depending on further factors (size of list, knowledge about ...


0

Think of it as if you have a list of values and you wish to segregate them into different buckets depending upon some condition. You can then have a table of all these values with the four buckets right below it as shown in the picture below: This layout will also prove to be useful when you try to make your design responsive for tablets. You can keep ...


1

Everything looks click-able on a mobile device :-P What I don't understand, is your desire to drag the user into every corer of your app. As I see it, the graphs will give the (novice) user sufficient information. I'm pretty sure that more advanced users would tap the label or the graph if they wanted to read more about the details. But I'm not sure, ...


0

I think that hints are the worse possible solution. It's like putting "Pull" on a door handle. You have several solutions. I would recommend having the phrase "clickable graphs" or "after having clicked the graph" interspersed in the copy; or instead of titleing the graph "XXX Graph" call it the "XXX [Clickable |Interactive | appropriate wod] Graph"


0

Key consideration is that material design is a (multi) platform UI. This is not an application UI. As such there are a few considerations specification can reasonably set paradigms that users will be expected learn ability for a single UI approach to scale to large and/or complex navigation requirements means that more applications can fit within the ...


0

Whatever your constraints, stick to conventions where possible. Check out Nielsen's 10 Heuristics for good rules of thumb. If an element is not editable, it should appear disabled or inactive. Help the user by explaining why something is locked with an alert. Set the users' expectations and afford them clues as to what is going on. Tabs are used as a ...


0

I would just suggest a higher resolution display because frankly that's the easiest way to do it. 2560x1600/2560x1440 are generally 27" or bigger and aren't cramped like 4K monitors, and you can get high-quality displays for $250+. Assuming cost is an option, it's also possible to set each tab as an individual window and set each to 1230px (since that ...


0

The hamburger menu is a bit lazy because there are other methods to get to the menu and most apps don't really need an overflow option set. A good example of an app that does? Chrome, because it has 14 functions built into the one menu. For an app like Chrome where there's a ton of functionality but 99% of users need to access exactly 1% of them daily on ...


1

This isn't necessarily a problem with a hidden menu, more the information architecture of the site possibly. This might not matter as much as we once thought, with the "three click rule" - http://uxmyths.com/post/654026581/myth-all-pages-should-be-accessible-in-3-clicks The hamburger icon is beginning to become recognisable, this question is useful - Has ...


0

The hamburger isn't intended to show where you are, and just about every mobile website and app uses it as the menu icon, so it's very easily identifiable. To show a user where they are, you can use breadcrumbs. Twice as many taps versus what? If you're referring to a desktop menu that's a yes and no, depending on it it has drop downs etc.


3

I see your point Jitendra. I do that a lot, revisit a site I signed up for a long time ago and can't remember what service I used to sign in with. At the same time, its better to get someone to signup initially and whatever it takes to make that easier is probably the way to go. Plus, if a user forgot what they signup up with they probably aren't that ...


4

I would say no, many options are good. You want to make it easy for people to join The main idea behind providing multiple options is to make it easy for people to join, and you cannot expect everybody to have an account on the platform you choose as most important. Most people will not choose a random platform to sign up, but will choose the same ...



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