New answers tagged

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It really depends on how often the data updates (and therefore how many users are working concurred) and how long the user will stay on the page. If the user logs in once per day to see, if there are new documents, the dialog showing the list of documents can be "updated" on login. If the platform is rather agile, i.e. there is lots of cooperative work on ...


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Drill down means you show only one menu at a time. It brings you further down the menu structure. An example is the iPod menu: Or see this working example in jQuery. A hierarchical multi-level menu is more like a dropdown or accordion menu where the whole submenu structure is visible: Accordion example: Or as dropdown menu: An example in bootstrap


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User completes one booking first and then move ons to next booking (NOT ADVISABLE, To much efforts and clicks involved at User's end) Here is a 2 step scenario: Step 1: User should be able to select one or multiple Dates. Something like marking multiple Dates on a calendar. Step 2: Once Dates are selected, User can select the timeslots against the ...


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Like a classic e-commerce site, user should have both options: Complete the booking - this is like going to shopping cart approval and then proceed to the payment. Continue booking - this is like Continue shopping. There are several approaches to how to present the user the two options. Some sites are prompting for the shopping cart approval step with ...


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Speaking from the user perspective, I think it makes the most sense to complete the first booking before starting to provide all the info needed for the second booking - unless I wanted to set up a "regular" appointment, like every 5 weeks please set up an appointment with me with Barber Joe Smith for 11:30am on Saturday. In that case an option to repeat ...


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Double clicking isn't intuitive, and having to explain that behavior through a popup is a waste of space on your form, plus it isn't always visually appealing. An idea I have in mind is to use "slide to delete" which most people are familiar with nowadays. Even though its less used on desktop the idea is the same that users can use mouse to slide the button ...


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Generally speaking, no. You're basically implementing a software equivalent to a guarded switch. This is not a pattern that the large majority of users are familiar with and it will cause confusion on initial use. It is a button that looks like any other button, but behaves differently. It is also unclear how I use the button. Do I click once, get the ...


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Additional Menu One of the main sources of potential confusion here is that an individual hyphen in a cell can end up a long way from the icon in the menu bar that lets the user know what it's for. Showing the same menu bar when the user expands a section could alleviate this. 'Frozen Row' or 'Sticky' Menu You might also consider replicating the ...


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The initial premise or assumption of your question that having some research that you can reference address these issues My hope is that if any research does exist, some or most of these issues will be covered. is probably going to set up unreasonable expectations. As you know, research is designed to answer specific questions under a specific set of ...


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Lets look at this way. Arrow certainly indicates a sub-nav, but few things need to considered - 1) If your navigation has some other items that do not have a sub-navigation, then it might make good sense to add that arrow to differentiate it from other nav categories. A good example could be Amazon (check screenshot) - See how the "Shop by Category" nav ...


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As per my comments I thought I would post a mockup to explain. If you maintain your current workflow then I would use the following: A prominent "Save"/"Save Photo" button first (Directs to in app purchase content) A secondary level "Save with watermark" button The in app purchase content should also explain somewhere that they can still save photos ...


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I think Abhishek Sharma is on the right track. However, I also think the following isn't clear: When I look at the above, it's now clear to me that I've selected Create a live photo, but it's not clear to me what the Video | Photo option is for? I guess it wouldn't take long to figure out, especially if you're using it, but I do feel it's missing ...


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See the color: At very first look to this image, I can't able to see "Create A live Photo" as it is in dark color over the dark BG. Read more about Colors You have logo in pink color you can use grey color for inactive links. if you want to remove this small triangle you can remove it, it will look good without this also. Hope you understood the ...


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To be honest, the number one thing a user expects after subscribing to something (be it a newsletter, service, etc) or after submitting data (be it a form, uploading documents, etc) is a confirmation that what they've just done was successful. Now, how you do this may be restricted by your requirements (yours, your client's, the company you work for, etc), ...


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I think the cause of the confusion is your colour choice : the use of black and white is so mixed such that it is unclear to the user "including myself" which one is the highlight colour and which is the background colour. So, my advice : change highlight color, it should be unique and obvious .


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Using two different words for the export (e.g., export, save) is a little confusing. It's better to be consistent; make both export or both save. If you're going to specify tag free, separate that from the action. Here are some formatting alternatives: EXPORT | TAG FREE or EXPORT (TAG FREE) EXPORT | WITH TAG or EXPORT (WITH TAG) Watermarks are fairly ...


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You may want to consider an alternative solution entirely. Allow your users to edit > save seamlessly. Keep the UX enjoyable and decision free i.e. don't risk confusing or annoying the user when it comes to saving a photo every time they do so. What if a user doesn't understand what a watermark is for example? Instead, just allow them to save away ...


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I agree with comment by @jazZRo to your previous question that it is better to include price to first button. Thus you can avoid user frustration by clearly showing the options. However, the decision is yours. Possible wordings for the buttons: Save pure image ($00.00) Save pure ($00.00) Save clean image ($00.00) Save clean ($00.00) Save tagged image ...


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Why are you using 'Export' word in red button and 'Save' in text Button? I see a good approch. But Text Button looks very different, I thought it will have different funtionality. Both buttons belong to same group. So design keeping consistency. See above, it looks like both are clickable and are buttons.


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Don Norman attempted to do a multimedia version for three of his books a while ago. From what I know, the experiment wasn't a success, you can probably find more about it online. He also talks about it in the last version of Design of Everyday Things. It is called First Person and here is a short video showcasing some of the ineractions First Person : Don ...


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I would narrow down the problem definition - documents are supposed to convey information. And to quote from Bret Victor (http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/#p155): Information software [...] mimics the experience of reading, not working. It is used for achieving an understanding—constructing a model within the mind. [...] For information software, all ...


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This question is a false dichotomy from implementation point of view and the UX questions are unrelated to which implementation is chosen (if done well), so it is very unlikely that any such research exists: *.pdf, *.docx, *.odt and other "document" formats can and often do contain non-portable content, e.g. links to dead sites, embedded videos/pictures ...


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There is very little current research, possibly because the use cases for interactive documents has been taken over by the web, and in parallel, the increase in availability of devices and connectivity. One paper that discusses the attributes of an interactive document can be found at PubMed Central from 2011, 'Interactive Publication: The document as a ...


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As a compromise, I suggest you put a visual sign: one arrow for a start (and only one) in a distinguished place, like next to the home button. That indicates that all the next buttons are dropdown menus. I said arrow for a start, but it doesn't have to be an arrow.


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Yes, you need arrows. All touchscreen devices cannot hover, so you must include information about the nature of a menu item, as it cannot be discerned or discovered by hovering. Some might argue you could/should detect if it's a touch device and then add the arrows. No. Because: A user might have their touch device set to spoof as desktop browser A user ...


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It used to be that arrows were preferred as they provided a visual cue to users there was more to the menu if they clicked on / hovered over them. Over time web developers started making these menus activate on both a click and hover, in which case the arrows aren't necessary as users by default will click or tap on a menu item. If doing so then reveals a ...


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Bit hard to say for certain without some images to go with your scenario. It's generally a good idea to maintain consistency for common actions, such as close. If you're using apps like OpenOffice, it's probably fair to assume your expected behavior is frequent (e.g., people use the devices regularly). So, I'd expect people to habitualize common actions ...


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Imagine that you have dbl click on single click I mean your mouse need a repair i.e you click once but mouse behave like you made a double click so then what? Maybe if some object is valuable, to delete user must type the name to confirm? Inspiration from deleting repo on GitHub


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RuneScape has a pretty good idea here, honestly. Items can be dropped by right-clicking and selecting the "drop" action. This would drop the item to the floor, which can then be picked up by yourself for the first minute, and after that by anyone for another minute. If the item was not tradable, it would just disappear after a minute instead. If the item ...


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How about a right-click? Do you store the users control options? Maybe you could give them an option to use double-click (or maybe even right-double-click) without the warning from now on, after their confirmation.


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Double-clicking buttons is odd. Usually, in the OS, double-clicking is a shortcut for clicking once (selecting the file) and selecting "Open." Rather than an "Are you sure?" confirmation I prefer an undo action. Confirming every action you take gets tedious real fast, and after a while users click the "Yes" button without thinking about it. Undo, on the ...


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As you have pointed out, the double click is not a standard behaviour that your users are familiar with in the situation you are describing. It's not good practice to use non-standard interactions where you could use a standard one. Irreversible actions (such as deletion) are usually followed up with a 'sanity check' like "Are you sure? [Yes] [No]".


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There is little evidence of any specific apps or design features on mobile devices designed to reduce the risk of RSI. However there may be features that reduce the risk without that specific intent. There's a nice article in a medical journal from a few years ago interviewing an industrial designer at RIM (remember them?) which goes through some of the ...


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When I worked in forex, we did user testing and training for a visual trading strategy creation application. It proved easier to get into, and faster to create non-complex strategies (which most are). Another good example is Jira's workflow builder. Most of the project managers I've worked with - including in legal, marketing, accounting departments - had ...


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Trust is relative Building a relationship with users is relative to the needs of the project. Setting up a bank account is likely to require more trust than buying toothpaste at Walmart. Many people who shop at Walmart are practically self-loathing customers, but they keep coming back for the perceived savings or convenience because "it's not that big of a ...


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I think the approach taken when they designed the DRAKON visual language is something to consider while choosing or designing a visual programming language. For DRAKON they designed a set of rules or constraints applied in a visual manner that try to emulate or improve the rules used for text based programing languages. In text based programming languages ...


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My personal preference would be: keep the tabs on the left, use background color for the selected tab same as the inner box border color, separate groups of digits, e.g. 1000-054, use a gray x on each tab, which would be highlighted on hover to a red x, and a + sign on the bottom tab there are plenty of inspirations for vertical tabs, close tab, add new ...


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I feel giving people choices to edit hours, minutes and am/pm is much better option to have in your alarm and for this i think showing current time will be great. Also, there is much better approaches used in Android using Google material design for setting up an alarm, that can be approached too.


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Buttons should say what they do, or actionable links in your case. "Conditions" doesn't mean squat. "Show Conditions" tells me exactly what action I'm about to take. Would most users figure out "Conditions"? Probably. Would more users figure out "Show/Hide Conditions"? Yes. Should you hide important legal information? No. But that's a different question.


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Care for response, delete keys and change activity regardless but notify user Have a serverside backup system. Every so often (once a minute, once every 10 minutes, you decide) you ping the device from the server. If the ping comes back, session stays open. If it doesn't, session ends. Then, when you logout but can't connect to your server, you give them a ...


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Redundancy and duplication is not always a bad thing. The X close icon in the modal is something you see everywhere in software so its meaning is very well known for a very long time (think Microsoft Windows operating system panels and Microsoft apps like MS Office). A command button with a label is often more explicit than an icon, but the choice of label ...


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The "OK" button has the wrong word. It should be a "Continue" button, as this is what's required of the user. The user is being asked to acknowledge they're aware of the nature of the warning, and that they'll be continuing without a current reload/refresh of the data. It is not OK that the data didn't load, so there's a needless cognitive dissonance ...


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As a general principle what you want to achieve is clear, easy, self-explaining, etc... ways for your users to interact with your application. In this type of modal an "OK" or "Close" modal would be pretty equivalent since they don't have to make a decision about something, it's just an short and simple informative message about something that has already ...


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Apple uses a thing called the Tab Bar to solve this particular problem, sort of... It's supposed to give you different options/views of the same or similar data. In practice it's used a lot more like a tab between different modes of operation and different datas. I think this is your best possible approach, here, and will give you room to add more ...



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