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1

You're observing the tension between usability, cost, form factors, and standards. Cost dictates things like part count -- a single LED is cheaper than two, a tri-color LED is cheaper than a 7-segment display, a display screen is more expensive still. Form factor determines how big the UI can physically be, limiting space for components like memory and ...


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You could use overlays to point to the appropriate button, or the general area of it. You'd need to detect the browser type and draw the help accordingly. Start out with your regular page, with your button/link/whatever that starts the recording process: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups On pressing the button, ...


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It sounds like a problem that is best solved with a help page with clear instructions and screen shots of what the users should expect in different browsers. You could also detect the user's browser and tailor the help to that. However, I would still make the help for all browsers accessible to everyone in some way. Allow the possibility that someone ...


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I agree this is somewhat problematic. A user may expect a menu, but be taken to a page without warning. Or the reverse might happen: they won't realize that there are subcategories to some of the menu items, so they won't discover all of the content of your site. You should be able to solve this with visual cues to differentiate the two types of icons. ...


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I think putting an edit button (or simple "edit" text link) on each line, isn't too bad. This is a typical pattern for editing items from a list.


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I like MonkeyZeus starting message about freeing the slot for other people to use it. As of he countdown, IMO it's annoying for the users that will feel pressed and won't enter the best data they can. I like the ATM method, asking "Do you need more time?" after a TBD while. One advantage of this approach is that slow users have already experimented in in the ...


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1.The verification of this process can be made after they provide an existing mail id and if the same is available in your domain you can provide them the same by which the user will feel familiar. 2.If the username is not available try to mix up the values from mail and age. I guess you can give your suggestions to the user from the values provided in ...


1

1.The 4 icons added on the bottom left can be moved to right top next to the search bar as you have some space o'er there and also the left pane as a whole can be used for the preview(the client's req, as you have specified). 2.There are no particular conventions unless the user is satisfied with the positions where you provide the options (as ...


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I'd make it auto-generated to save the user and yourself from yet another workflow. If its something that they won't be giving out to others, they can add themselves as a contact in their real email client. Also if its something that could potentially be exploited by others by merely sending an email to that address, might consider NOT making it easily ...


2

Since these email ids are permanent, I would suggest allowing users to choose their own email id and if their email id is not present, then you can suggest alternate ones as you are suggesting. Here is an example of how Gmail does it You can also provide a button which when clicked generates a random email id for them for anonymity purposes. This way ...


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The way I see it is that you are trying to solve two problems: Tell the user not to dilly-dally with the survey but don't distract them When appropriate, let them know they are running out of time Issue #1 possible solution At the start of the survey, simply have a message stating that "Please note that after 20 minutes of inactivity your session will ...


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Showing the time remaining should and as well shouldn't affect the user. It must remind the user about the time and that it for which the input area where the user is writing can be highlighted with a mild red color to wake him/her up. As the color fades a small sandclock/digital time remaining can be indicated at the top. This can also be like the color ...


1

Can have a variant too with the available JS frameworks and libraries, loading the content is taking negligible ms which helps us change the data in just a wink. With the above speed, we can also go for another variation where more data can be shown to the user without much navigation between the pages and also by using the minimal space available between ...


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I think that: since for a "normally" working user (i.e. one that types in his/her answer without any major no-typing-breaks) there's no need to display anything (like you said, in this case, showing a non-counting counter would be just confusing) then, don't display anything only show the counter when a no-typing break duration has been reached. This ...


2

What happens when you select an item? If you are to just show the selected item, you can have a contrasting color in the background. Assuming it is a shopping site, you would want to provide action icons like "Mark as favorite", "Add to cart", etcetera. In this case, no additional styling for the selected item would be required.


5

The state you describe appears to happen when a user is away from keyboard or no longer actually doing something. What would be appropriate is to put a gray overlay over the screen/survey with a messagebox in the center, modal dialog. This will show a kind of disabled state and allows you to put a timer and explanation in it. Something like "It appears ...


2

Add a selection outline with the height of the slider like this: Since the item will never exceed the height of the slider, it should work.


0

To make user more perceptive of how time might work use something much more understandable yet not tangible to give exact measure. This will give them an idea that time is not infinite, and yet they won't be scared by numbers.


1

You need separate the controls from the background in more prominent way, to make it more clear they are not the part of the image, rather they are "external" objects. Human are trained good (from physical world) to recognize 3D scenes. One way to convey this is to use element, which overlays the image. Semi-transparent bar with controls in the UI is the ...


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Consider using some kind of field behind the icons. Any kind of contrast behind the icon is going to make it difficult to identify the shape. The grey represents the image, and the circle and triangle are different kinds of icons.


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It's much easier for the user to understand what each option do by showing them the difference as oppose to trying to describe it with text. Here's an example from WooThemes' theme demo If this is too much to do technically, you can get away with a preview image. Example from Hootsuite. This approach can be be done in a modal depending on the how large ...


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I don't think anyone can answer "why" except perhaps the designer of the feature, who may have been trying an experiment. Apple uses "shake" on the iphone as an "undo", which I think is an homage to the Etch-A-Sketch, and is only slightly less obscure. The overall problem is "keep these things off the interface because you don't always need them, but ...


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By "process" I assume you mean screens/pages that require the user to fill in information? The "Getting Started" setup process for the OS itself is probably as native as you could get (I'm not sure how WP7's setup process is, as that's what you tagged, but WP8 should be what you're looking for). I don't recall it having an indicator, though. When you upgrade ...


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Navigation process should follow the task flows based on user needs in specific context. Develop your task flows keeping in mind the user context, and needs. If it is tested to be the same for Desktop and Mobile users, stick to similar navigation pattern, otherwise, I suggest you to change, as both Desktop and Mobile user needs and context tend to differ.


0

Removing the [X] button should be avoided at all costs since it is the go to button if you don't know what to do and want to cancel your actions. That said I have had to make a few of them in the past. The reason was that we were building a new UI on a very old piece of software. On 1 or 2 occasions the software needed a response from the user in such a way ...


3

I had a friend login User testing! Awesome! and the immediate reaction was that I needed some sort of basic tour to explain how to get around. Great feedback, but it is telling you something different than what you are currently reading from it. What your user testing is telling you is that your navigation architecture is inappropriate for your ...


3

The only time I can think of when no close button should be there is when "Cancel" action is not acceptable, e.g. the user must make a choice. This is often connected to popups that isn't caused by user action. For example, the system must be restarted and asks the user when the system should reboot. "Now", "In an hour" etc. Letting the user close that ...


1

I want to start of by saying that I loath modals. I do know that there are certainly scenarios where they are good and necessary, but I really don't like them on principal. That being said, some of the examples given, I would argue, do not justify the disabling of the close button. A close button is a very known and comfortable escape hatch. Depending on ...


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I am more of developer than a UX person. But I feel dialog boxes without a close button have a purpose. For the most part I like a principle from About Face of don't ask for confirmation. Rather give them a chance to undo. Problem there is some actions cannot be undone and can have severe consequences. This is kind of a data integrity thing but release ...


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Personally, I think Microsoft's guideline makes little sense. A typical dialog requesting a decision from the user give buttons for all of the possible actions to take at that point (ok/cancel, yes/no, save/don't save/cancel). On most dialogs, the close button doesn't give the user additional "control"; it just provides a duplicate way to perform an ...


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I work with Axure most times and this is how I usually approach - in my every-day, real work environment - the realisation and documentation of complex interactions (like the ones you describe): I realise the interactive prototype in Axure Pro 7.0. I use the "Notes" functionality to add extra notes and details and make sure I give all the information ...


1

As a mobile user, I don't think it is a good idea to have many new windows open when I am going through a process. What if I want to go back and change something, right? I would suggest you make it like a "slide show" form without opening new screens. Apple setting is a good example. On the first form, you can show all the products. You can make it ...


0

You can use it if you make sure touch enabled users can still use it. Also, make sure the page won't reload when users try to enable the hover drop down with a click. I've seen some examples where users tried to click which caused the page to reload and resulted in no drop down.


0

There's an option to keep both. Some users will find it very useful to have a hover feature, especially on a desktop. While for the others, mainly the touch screen users - You can make the following adjustments in your CSS: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2851663/how-do-i-simulate-a-hover-with-a-touch-in-touch-enabled-browsers


0

If you're creating for desktop, it's ok to enable it. Just don't forget to add a little delay on it so the user's screen don't start showing lists nonstop on passing the mouse fast, that can be annoying.


2

Do people (in different countries) use different list-style-type for numbering list element? (e.g. shopping list, to-do list, list of students in school, ...) Yes in some countries using different alphabets to Latin If so, does Greek use greek, Japanese use katakana, Armenians armenian, ... all the time (in every situation) or maybe in a few cases ? ...


2

This is to ensure localization is supported and when a website translation is done, the list styles also reflect localization. For example,here is a screenshot of the number options in different languages which are supported by CSS and required by the W3 for localization For example if you were localizing for Ethiopia, You would be required to use ...


0

When taking a Mobile First approach, your navigation would be determined by your product being used on a phone. If this is the case, drop downs would be a poor choice. Not only do hover States not exist in mobile, but they increase complexity (typically unnecessarily). This scales to desktop where ideally you would share the same navigation hierarchy ...


1

Depends a lot on which kind of thing you work on. For example if it is primarilly targeted on mobile, do not enable dropdowns on hover. On the other hand, in case your thing is a desktop application and you have a strong reason (like complexity, lack of mobile users, speed of use, enough hit area in design etc. ) - go for it.


0

Breadcrumbs are your friends here. By allowing users to view what they've done already, you should be able to show them how their choices effect the current outcome. It might be prudent to include simple language with your crumbs. If possible, displaying an image of their custom product would certainly provide interest and context.


1

Changing the system logic seems like a better approach than dealing with forms that have errors. It's a bit hard to tell where to start without knowing the details but I would suggest starting with just listing all of the rules, settings so that you fully understand the scope of the problem. Once you know all of the components you could run a card sorting ...


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I suppose whenever you work on a ux project, you have to have at least some personas and/or user scenarios – whether they provide personas and/or user scenarios to you or not. So I fear you'll have to think of building your own personas and user scenarios. Be sure that you document those personas and user scenarios – at least I would recommend that you (of ...


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You can always do a basic heuristic evaluation without too much domain knowledge. For anything you suggest over and above that, document the assumptions you've made about the users of the application, and explain how you would go about more realistic user research and validating your proposed improvements were you actually working for the company.



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