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2

I would suggest a small preloader that shows progress, for example: A couple other small tweaks that could help: if any animations happen when you open a document (for example, expanding a thumbnail to full page size), have those happen while the doc is loading wait another 1/4 second or so before showing the preloader have the preloader fade in over ...


1

Problem with spinners is you dont know how far into loading you are. Some sort of loading bar could work better. A nice little trick is to actually speed up the loading bar to begin with and then slow it down towards the end to actually represent the loading data. It gives the impression 'oh i am nearly done' rather than people abandoning the download if it ...


0

There is generally no way for a user to know if they can reveal something by hovering. More important, there is no way to hover on the vast majority of touch screen devices. This means that hover-and-drop-down menus for instance are completely unusable. I have this problem for years trying to access connection requests on LinkedIn on my phone. You can't ...


1

Well, since you ask for it, here you have a very complete study with examples and a lot of data, another very conceptual study on what they call data hallucination , reference on Circadian clock. Keep in mind this is very technical information, and while very useful, maybe a bit overkill for your needs. Also, there's something that is not being considered ...


3

F.lux has some information that may be relevant to this situation. F.lux is a software that overlays your desktop screen and adjusts colors depending on the time of day to make it easier on the eyes. f.lux research Blue Light Affects Sleep (and here's why) We know that night-time exposure to blue light keeps people up late. We believe that f.lux ...


2

I believe that what this really boils down to is that you are using the wrong control for the job. Most often when designing an interface, if you can't easily map an input to a certain control, it's not the correct control to be using. In this case while a slider might look more streamlined and attractive, you've noticed their limitation; They exist to ...


3

Big companies can get away with a lack of hovering, because they invent the standard for others to follow in. Take Facebook for example. Half the links there aren't advertised as links. There's just so much data on a page that they can get away with providing links to pages with zero guidance. People look forward to a standard they can use.. but most ...


6

They don’t! As web applications are more and more packed with information, the need to hide controls have emerged. The option would be to have even longer web pages, showing a lot of redundant controls for every post as in "unfollow post, unfollow updates from user X, unlike page, still like page but don't show updates, and on and on and on. This has made ...


1

The share and save links are fine because: Icons/Buttons alongside text. Knowledge of word meaning and standardised placement of links makes it an intuitive location to put them. Good colours away from the standard text colours of the page. Why the heading for the 'element' is not so good: Same colour, styles (and size?) as the top header Image ...


0

Loading (especially uploading) something without the user's direct consent might look like a privacy breach, not to mention "a shift in locus of control." However, if you scan the USB and make an educated suggestion to the user, this might work really well. Like: "The xxx file on your USB card looks like the right one. Shall we use it?" Yes/Select another ...


0

Taking materials into consideration.. Chinese tea cups are made out of thicker material where it doesn't conduct heat so probably design need not required any ear to it.


0

Better solution is to use Disk partition kind of UI:- With this kind of UI:- Works well for percetage based allocation. Visually get the rough percentage allocations. Re-sizing the boundary line b/w two settings will change the allocation. Details of the allocation can be provided below the respective block. Any underutilized portion can be shown in ...


1

Solve the problem with a dialog Here's how it could work: you run a check for available games once again, when the user clicks the "Submit" button — no matter how long it took him to fill in the form. If at that point there's another game available, you present him with a dialog: "Meanwhile, another game has become available. Would you like to join it?" ...


2

If I was the user, I would expect to get presented with a create game screen, if I stay on that screen for 5 seconds or 5 days it shouldn't matter, when I press the create game button it should be respected and the game actually created. However, if I leave the create game screen and try to go back, it should check for games again before presenting me the ...


0

It seems you wanted to fill the screen space but in this case you sacrifice readability and consistency. I would do the following: put each sub-category (All Products, Categories, Inventory Maintenance) in a separate row; it will work smooth with the rotation too; don't worry about the empty space - sooner or later you'll probably have to add new features ...


0

I see what you mean with the not-so-obviousness of the error. To look at it another way: could you indicate progress in a non-linear way (related to the form information, but not step by step), which gives a completely blatant indication of what's DONE and what's PENDING? Pending can do along with glowing perhaps to hit it home (a subtle glowing or ...


4

I would always take the user back to where they have come from. One of the reasons is that they could be cancelling, and didn't mean to get into this page. You don't want to confuse them further by taking them somewhere else where they would have to find their way out.


1

From a quick look at the page, it would seem that one way of handling this is to issue a page wide banner/overlay which identifies errors and on-click the user is directed to the element which is wrong/missing. The element can also be highlighted.


2

Scrolling pattern and navigation largely depends on the information architecture and content strategy of your website. The page scroll UI pattern has been largely used to showcase features of a product and I think it has been misused in this way. In most cases, the features are not peers but are related/dependent on each other. It seems page section ...


1

Your sketch makes sense and its one of the many ways to solve the puzzle. And believe it or not, its as simple as it gets. It is possible with D3.js; if you look deeper into timeseries type of visualizations you might find an open source code or modules that would help you build it. Here's some resources for you to get started For your step line graph ...


3

Interesting question. It depends on the maturity of your users. The scrollbar is good option to give your users a hint about the amount of content that is remaining to be viewed. By the size of the scroller handle. Showing it persistently need not be the case. As the user is interested in the content. This can appear when the user is swiping from left to ...


0

Having both the scrollbar and swiping the images might cause confusion as the swipe directions will be different. Dragging the scrollbar to Left to Right to reveal the images to the right Swipe the images Right to Left to reveal the images to the right. I would say that the partially hidden image to the right is enough of a hint to users. Scrollbars ...


0

You're asking when it's OK to hide certain controls. I came across one useful answer to this question is in the book, Designing from both sides of the screen, by Ellen Isaacs and Alen Walendowski. This book talks about frequency and commonality as a way to assess whether a feature needs to be built, and also how prominent the feature should be in the user ...


1

Bulk edit is a power tool. Affordance, although discoverability might be a more relevant term here, isn't a big issue because this is not the only way to delete or edit items. You can always drill down into a specific item to manage it. So while you do have to "learn" it the first time around. Once you have, it's not a big deal. Also remember an interface ...


1

I think the faded item will clearly say "there's more stuff over here", and the way you get to items partially off the screen is, by standard, the swipe. The scrollbar would be useful to show how many items are off-screen (one screenful? a dozen?) and where you are in the horizontal list, but that's clearly a secondary need.


1

If I was a user and had that layout in front of me, I would try to swipe using the images first, and if that failed I would try to use the scroll bar to scroll along. I do, however, consider myself an advanced user of technology. Having both options will let more advanced users or those who use touch devices primarily use the swipe action, and the scroll ...


0

There is no UX reason to limit undos. The reason undos are limited are due to hardware and software limitations (which were greater in the past than today).


0

The other common pattern is putting the edit icon, which is usually a pencil-looking icon, at the upper corner at the end of the line and is only visible when the mouse cursor is hovering the row


1

A year ago when i was designing an application for time registration and planning, I designed and tested 24 hour selection widget like in below. Instead of select all, deselect all, creating patterns related to the context (day shift, night shift and holiday) worked quite well. After you select a template, you can change each boxes like toggle button - on ...


1

It seems, the conceptual model you provide isn't aligned with user's mental model. Let's step back from UI to UX. There are research which recommend clear time limitations for parents: Pediatricians: No More than 2 Hours Screen Time Daily for Kids Children should have two-hour limits on the time spent in front of screens Parents also aware of the ...


0

The clients always wanted to know how the app or a web page look like and even they have their own designs in mind. To fulfill their requirements the Interaction designers design prototypes that looks and feels exactly how the app will come out as a finished product. This can be achieved using tools like quartz composer, origami and adobe after effects etc.. ...


2

This is often people who want to show animations etc that don't know how to code and/or haven't come across any interactive prototyping tools. The benefits are that they can pitch things to stakeholders etc easier and also it can be a useful tool for communicating with devs what you are hoping to achieve interaction-wise. That said, it also leads to ...


2

Should we consider behavioral variables in the domain of the user (e.g. shopping) or behavioral variables in the domain of the product (e.g. shopping products) or both? Depends. Is not the same if you're working on a chain with many stores, a single store, a local online delivery shop, a worldwide retailer, and so on. As a general rule, the ...


1

I think you should go as granular as your objectives go. For example if you are looking to target search bar recommendations very specifically, you could go as deep as to know what are the most frequent searches for the persona, but if you want to go deeper, you could also analyse at what time in the day they search for certain types of products, considering ...


1

You create personas based on observation of real world users. They will exhibit behaviors. As you gather more observations of their various behaviors, certain behaviors will stand out as bold patterns: Things everyone does, things no one does, things everyone does once, things that are important, etc. These are your variables. For example, users of ...


0

The UI you have presented is not consistent either. It has visual consistency. But the interaction is not consistent. When a user adds a form, it is added below the dropdown, but when a new field is added, it is done above it. This affects consistency as well. The user has to get used to one of this pattern (either adding above or below). Otherwise, it ...


0

Consistency + heirarchy = mo betta There's nothing wrong with consistency among controls. I think the problem you're sensing is hierarchy. In your example, adding a field (the low-level item) is more prominent than added a form (the high-level item). The controls are identical, but the ground contrast is greater within the form edit module. With a few ...


1

Why is there no standard layout for computer keyboards? Because there is no keyboard governing body mandating everyone build keyboards the same way. That and history...every computer design had its own keyboard designed for the particular needs of the hardware and software being used. Over time, keyboards have become much more similar than different, ...


2

First, there is some standard. We have the QUERTY arrangement, CTRL, SHIFT, ALT and ENTER are arranged more or less the same. Your question is actually "why are not all keyboards have identical layout?". So it is the same as asking "why are not all toasters/refrigerators/ovens/cars have identical layout"? It may be all about money. Some possible answers to ...


0

The ideal answer is "test both" and see which works better for your users. Without testing, if you have to make a choice, clarity always trumps consistency. Focusing on your specific answer, I would suggest a different UX pattern for adding fields to make it even more different than adding a form. For example, eliminating the dropdown completely, and ...


0

Why not simply use an intuitive tri-state check-box column (if it's available)? It saves space, and properly represents your data (if/when users are familiar with such controls).


1

The context menu key – along with the Windows keys – is the most recent addition to the PC keyboard. The Microsoft Natural Keyboard, released ca. 1994–1995, was the first one to include them "for future uses". That "future use" was the UI introduced with Windows 95 – the first to make heavy use of context menus. The latter were around in previous versions ...


2

To answer your question, the frequency of this action should be considered. Low frequency: Users do not remember their options when they don't use them regularly and so the options should be easily findable and understandable. Considering the screen real estate you have mentioned, and for users to easily understand their options, I would also suggest a ...


0

Perhaps it has to do with when you learned to use a computer? I learned with command line interfaces. So for me, the majority of the cool things you can do with a mouse all collapse on to: Right-Click and choose from Menu, because that is how I recall commands: items from a list of possibilities. It never occurs to me to drag, I always select, right-click to ...


0

You could use AJAX and have it switch the two, I would use links for switching instead of a button.


0

You can use three radiobuttons with their backgroundcolor colored with Red = Out, Yellow = Undecided and Green = In (this because you mentioned a busy (tied) grid) and use a legend explaining the color meaning.


18

Design for the micro-workflow Observations Most users will make a selection and move on, as you noted. Users are not very likely to deselect a choice, either immediately or afterwards. In and Out are the primary choices here. The undecided choice is an unbiased default. Null/default/undecided/unknown choices are often very difficult to design ...


1

Before mice, there was no programming method to show a context menu. When mice appeared, there was no right-click. When extra buttons appeared, then the context menu made sense whenever applications were programmed for it. A context menu key on the keyboard usually did nothing, and when it did, the mouse was a better interface to show the menu. Web ...


1

Between your two mentioned options, the two toggle button option will be a good method. Advantages: clear affordances doesn't distract from the main content existing examples: upvote / downvote buttons across various sites like this (stackexchange), reddit, quora etc. [ p.s. since the elements would be inside a busy grid, implementing a design with ...


0

This is one that should be tested because I have no idea if it will work. I wanted to come up with something that uses common elements and shows all options in a compact way. The idea is to leave out the "undecided" label by using two checkboxes. Why checkboxes? It should be common to people that if no option is wanted you just have to uncheck them. It's ...



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