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3

Don't do it There are several reasons: Pull-to-refresh is a very common mobile UX idiom. You are asking users to unlearn the idiom and learn some other behavior in its place, which is going to feel unintuitive at best and annoying at worst. You are asking the user to slide vertically to delete horizontally, which is going to feel very weird since there ...


1

I don't think deleting letter by letter is a good thing : User doesn't want to pull for 10s if he wrote a long word/sentence. Besides, the idea to coming back few step backward by deleting some characters in the search is nice, just do it according to the size or syllabe by syllabe. EDIT : Don't forget to add a simple visual content to make the gesture is ...


0

Why not have a sticky search button somewhere within the UI? (preferably at the bottom so the users can tap it faster)


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If you are talking about creating requirements, IxD approach works well with volere requirement specification template. Hope this helps


1

The screenshots make it a bit clearer, but it's still hard to understand how the filters change, how many options there are, etc. Here are two approaches. The left one assumes you have a reasonably small number of categories. The right one assumes you have a large number of categories (e.g. Yelp or Amazon) and it'd be impractical to list them all out. ...


1

It's hard to analyze the full interaction because the clip doesn't show how the selector showed up (did it slide in? load with the page? appear after user clicked on the dropdown control at the top?) Based on the very limited clip: The page locks in the user's attention. The user is focused on the top where you have the Please select control and ...


1

This isn't necessarily your responsibility. This is Jony Ive's responsibility now. You're using a native element and we can really only assume that the person is somewhat familiar with the device they are using. Do you know if the person performing the task regularly uses an iPhone? Were they testing on an actual iPhone or an emulator? About the only ...


1

Based off of the clip, I would suggest closing the selector if it is open and the user clicks again. In doing this, it would give your users some kind of visual feedback. This would lead them to explore and see what changes, which would then help them notice the iOS selector at the bottom of the screen.


0

The simplest design is to have conventional filter, but with all categories checked initially (i.e., to include them in the search results). Now the user may uncheck those she does not want to see. If you want something more fancy, maybe you should provide some more information about the use case, the nature and number of filters, etc. for us to think ...


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In same real world applications you use multi-select drop-down list implementation because: -as you said "there isn't always a lot of space available" -The user doesn't know the items in the list... Regarding that, I'll show you an example: Here the user has a list of unknown file types coming from the server dynamically, so there is no option to use ...


0

"Practice make man perfect" as per this rule you realize which is good or best. One more thing keep habit like after done your work just ask third person who don't know any idea about your current work. And take review from him/her. Your work flow is understandable or not. Easily understandable or need to think more. And you can get idea.


1

For me, if you will be starting out for UX Design, read Steve Krug's Don't Make Me Think, Revisited for Web Usability. If you are targeting Windows Forms, Microsoft has its free documentation UX Guide for Windows Forms and Windows Store. References on usability is a good keyword for you to start your own adventure of searching for good references. I do ...


1

Thoughts on drop-down lists: I think all dropdown including the multi-select lists have probably reached the end of the line. Their versatility also proved to be their Achilles heel: Drop-down menus are often more trouble than they are worth and can be confusing because Web designers use them for several different purposes. Also, scrolling menus ...


0

You ask about multiple select dropdown but picture a multiple select list You cite as a reason you could not find multi select dropdown You don't find multi select dropdown because in a collapsed state a dropdown does not depict multiple selections. A drop down is poor UI for multi select for this reason. As for List versus a select like SO the ...


1

Yes it is. You shouldn't rely on your drag and drop functionality as the only way to upload files. I agree it is an 'advanced' features which many users don't know. Many users are clumsy with there mouse, so dragging a file across the screen can be hard, especially on trackpads! But in many cases, this method is a way faster. You ask 'Aren't users ...


0

Nielsen Norman Group wrote a great article about mega menus - I'm not sure if it addresses your particular needs or not, but they do say that drop down menus are user friendly, so long as they are multi-dimensional and robust, instead of just a block of text. They also mention the use of tags and tag clouds in that article, so I hope it's relevant to your ...


0

There is a personal finance website, Buxfer. It has an IOU component. There is a basic implementation of what you require. There are multiple people, sharing and expense. If we need to split it unevenly, it provides a simple UI with text boxes to provide the different amounts. It starts with equal split and as you make changes the yet untouched fields ...


0

One simple technique is to calculate percentages of slider values relative to sum of slider values and then reassign the slider values to respective calculated percentages. this way slider values will be readjusted e.g slider1.value = (slider1.value / sumOfSliderValues) * 100 ; slider2.value = (slider2.value / sumOfSliderValues) * 100 ; slider3.value = ...


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I tried to figure out why you want to rely on an agent to gather information. Do you try to simplify processes by offering a guided tour to enter data? If so, I don’t understand that you want to allow diverging from the data capturing mission because it could be misleading. You're right that users need to keep track of their progress or they start to skip ...


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It's called a parallax design. Search online for "define parallax website" and you'll get a number of examples and definitions. FWIW I was banging my head, trying to remember this word, found this question but no one (yet) had the answer. Mercifully, the word then popped in my head: parallax.


0

If it's a Web page, and the problem is to notify the user, then you can go with buttons instead of auto save. One advantage of using button is user can revert back until he presses save button and you don't have to write code to retrieve the previous changes. Also using JS you can write a method for page leave event in case the save or cancel button is ...


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I Am now looking to visualise this data within a clear interface for new millennial users. Like the tooltip box. Surely useful for whom might also have a look in this post. All the best Thank you


0

1. Less is more Trying to fit more stuff on a single page isn't the goal of providing a good UX. Figure out what the primary task at hand is and only show that. If additional details are needed in rare cases then hide those until the user requests them by clicking a show advanced options toggle button. "Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing ...


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One common name for this anti-pattern is Mystery Meat. As described in Designing Web Interfaces: Have you ever found a can in the back of the pantry whose label has long since fallen off? The only way to identify this mystery meat is to open it. Unidentifiable icons are pretty much the same as a row of unlabeled cans. You have to hover over each ...


1

When showing multiple items a vertical list is usually the way to go. The hardware world is built for vertical scrolling (mouse wheel, touchscreen, etc.) A pattern I like to use in your situation is to show as many items that will fit followed by a clear "show more" link. The benefit to this approach is that if most people only ever have 1-3 items then ...


2

Generally people do not have long sequential forms on a mobile device. However since the mobile is becoming feature rich in all aspects it is natural to expect that from mobile. @tohster has provided exact solution of how wizard can be implemented in mobile. You might want to consider few changes which may free up your real estate further. These are in ...


2

Use design prioritization to simplify the layout. The top priorities might be something like: User must know what stage she is on. User must know where she is in the overall process. So a few resulting possibilities are:


1

I'am designing a web application, which has a sticky menu and "back to the top" link, so in first time I was against using this nasty statement. It was remind me blog or ..., but finally after researching I come to agree especially in web applications that have different tools in sections, it's so important to use it( don't use it in normal website).WHY? let ...


2

Short answer : They should no longer be used! Long answer: Just attempting to understand the rationale here: When sticky navigation is available and selected menu item is highlighted the user has no means by which to know that clicking it again will take them to the top (depends on how familiar users are with sticky menus). In this particular situation ...


1

Is there a particular reason the user must be informed with a message being sent to the operator? I would suggest the minimalist approach. Example: When the user accepts the quote, the following message comes up: Quote Accepted. When the user rejects the quote, the following message comes up: Quote Rejected


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First of, if you could supply a little bit more information to the user that would be great, including a small piece of text indicating what they are doing. To answer your question, you have a mix up in the language you are using on screen, and the language in the alert / confirmation. accept The accept should say something like, thank you for ...


1

It is a bit off mostly because of the "Thank you." Pleasantries are nice but not at the expense of clarity. It might be better to have the messages simply confirm what the user has done: "You have rejected the quote." and what is going to happen next: "A message has been sent to the operator." To the extent that you can test the messages. See how people ...


0

I haven't looked at the Dropbox or Box apps in a while, but the pattern for Windows 8/8.1 apps is to access app settings through the charms bar. My guess is that this is the case for those apps. Swipe from the right to pull out the charms bar, then tap on Settings. There should be an option for Account or something similar in the fly-out that appears.


4

I would propose a third option. Make the button and image clickable It has become a convention that images are clickable on websites and in applications. My personal experience with this is during my time at a webshop where user research pointed out that almost 70% clicked the image of the product in a list of products in order to navigate to the product ...


0

Your clickable area doesn't have to be bigger than it needs to be to actually click, taking into account the size of fingers and the fact that some people don't have the motor skills with mice and fingers. From this article we see guidelines raging from 28px (Nokia) to 44px (Apple) but the article goes on to quote research here and here that shows the larger ...


0

Firstly, toggle buttons are somewhat problematic. Although they are a pretty common design pattern on modern touchscreen devices it isn't immediately obvious that one can activate them just by clicking. A user unfamiliar with this on-screen element but familiar with it's real life counterpart is going to try and drag it as we don't click such switches in the ...


0

Design priorities can help here. I think a priority here is, let's use the best control for the job. Checkboxes (without labels) are good for on/off states where it's clear what the check/uncheck states mean. Labeled toggle switches give you an opportunity to show what each state means ('on' and 'off'). I'm guessing the best control for your situation ...


1

Do wish to implement is the ability for the user to click on a row/column and be presented with the option of either filtering out all such column values or to include only those column values? If I have understood correct, here is what I think could solve your problem. This is not the best practise we follow when we use filter criteria but considering your ...


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I would just say it. I don't think there is a need to try to use Venn diagrams or something like that to make users to understand what inclusive or exclusive means. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Then again, do you really need to use these kind of filters? Do you have data to back up the decision to use this ...



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