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13

The "OK" button has the wrong word. It should be a "Continue" button, as this is what's required of the user. The user is being asked to acknowledge they're aware of the nature of the warning, and that they'll be continuing without a current reload/refresh of the data. It is not OK that the data didn't load, so there's a needless cognitive dissonance ...


12

As you have pointed out, the double click is not a standard behaviour that your users are familiar with in the situation you are describing. It's not good practice to use non-standard interactions where you could use a standard one. Irreversible actions (such as deletion) are usually followed up with a 'sanity check' like "Are you sure? [Yes] [No]".


8

It used to be that arrows were preferred as they provided a visual cue to users there was more to the menu if they clicked on / hovered over them. Over time web developers started making these menus activate on both a click and hover, in which case the arrows aren't necessary as users by default will click or tap on a menu item. If doing so then reveals a ...


7

As a general principle what you want to achieve is clear, easy, self-explaining, etc... ways for your users to interact with your application. In this type of modal an "OK" or "Close" modal would be pretty equivalent since they don't have to make a decision about something, it's just an short and simple informative message about something that has already ...


4

Double-clicking buttons is odd. Usually, in the OS, double-clicking is a shortcut for clicking once (selecting the file) and selecting "Open." Rather than an "Are you sure?" confirmation I prefer an undo action. Confirming every action you take gets tedious real fast, and after a while users click the "Yes" button without thinking about it. Undo, on the ...


4

There is very little current research, possibly because the use cases for interactive documents has been taken over by the web, and in parallel, the increase in availability of devices and connectivity. One paper that discusses the attributes of an interactive document can be found at PubMed Central from 2011, 'Interactive Publication: The document as a ...


2

You're going to need to explicitly tell users they can do this, and provide a visual demonstration of the functionality, because this is extremely uncommon. There is almost nothing like this in this era of completely singular copy/paste thinking. See Ted Nelson's complaints about this ridiculous reduction in the power of computing. He was, so far as I ...


2

There is little evidence of any specific apps or design features on mobile devices designed to reduce the risk of RSI. However there may be features that reduce the risk without that specific intent. There's a nice article in a medical journal from a few years ago interviewing an industrial designer at RIM (remember them?) which goes through some of the ...


2

Buttons should say what they do, or actionable links in your case. "Conditions" doesn't mean squat. "Show Conditions" tells me exactly what action I'm about to take. Would most users figure out "Conditions"? Probably. Would more users figure out "Show/Hide Conditions"? Yes. Should you hide important legal information? No. But that's a different question.


2

I agree with comment by @jazZRo to your previous question that it is better to include price to first button. Thus you can avoid user frustration by clearly showing the options. However, the decision is yours. Possible wordings for the buttons: Save pure image ($00.00) Save pure ($00.00) Save clean image ($00.00) Save clean ($00.00) Save tagged image ...


1

Additional Menu One of the main sources of potential confusion here is that an individual hyphen in a cell can end up a long way from the icon in the menu bar that lets the user know what it's for. Showing the same menu bar when the user expands a section could alleviate this. 'Frozen Row' or 'Sticky' Menu You might also consider replicating the ...


1

You may want to consider an alternative solution entirely. Allow your users to edit > save seamlessly. Keep the UX enjoyable and decision free i.e. don't risk confusing or annoying the user when it comes to saving a photo every time they do so. What if a user doesn't understand what a watermark is for example? Instead, just allow them to save away ...


1

Why are you using 'Export' word in red button and 'Save' in text Button? I see a good approch. But Text Button looks very different, I thought it will have different funtionality. Both buttons belong to same group. So design keeping consistency. See above, it looks like both are clickable and are buttons.


1

This question is a false dichotomy from implementation point of view and the UX questions are unrelated to which implementation is chosen (if done well), so it is very unlikely that any such research exists: *.pdf, *.docx, *.odt and other "document" formats can and often do contain non-portable content, e.g. links to dead sites, embedded videos/pictures ...


1

Don Norman attempted to do a multimedia version for three of his books a while ago. From what I know, the experiment wasn't a success, you can probably find more about it online. He also talks about it in the last version of Design of Everyday Things. It is called First Person and here is a short video showcasing some of the ineractions First Person : Don ...


1

I would narrow down the problem definition - documents are supposed to convey information. And to quote from Bret Victor (http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/#p155): Information software [...] mimics the experience of reading, not working. It is used for achieving an understanding—constructing a model within the mind. [...] For information software, all ...


1

How about a right-click? Do you store the users control options? Maybe you could give them an option to use double-click (or maybe even right-double-click) without the warning from now on, after their confirmation.


1

Care for response, delete keys and change activity regardless but notify user Have a serverside backup system. Every so often (once a minute, once every 10 minutes, you decide) you ping the device from the server. If the ping comes back, session stays open. If it doesn't, session ends. Then, when you logout but can't connect to your server, you give them a ...


1

Redundancy and duplication is not always a bad thing. The X close icon in the modal is something you see everywhere in software so its meaning is very well known for a very long time (think Microsoft Windows operating system panels and Microsoft apps like MS Office). A command button with a label is often more explicit than an icon, but the choice of label ...


1

Apple uses a thing called the Tab Bar to solve this particular problem, sort of... It's supposed to give you different options/views of the same or similar data. In practice it's used a lot more like a tab between different modes of operation and different datas. I think this is your best possible approach, here, and will give you room to add more ...


1

Trust is relative Building a relationship with users is relative to the needs of the project. Setting up a bank account is likely to require more trust than buying toothpaste at Walmart. Many people who shop at Walmart are practically self-loathing customers, but they keep coming back for the perceived savings or convenience because "it's not that big of a ...



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