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71

It might not have many UX reasons... ... but it is benefical for the company. I start with companies that have a large community, for example amazon. They have 244 million users and therefore many e-mails to send and to reply to. Most of the sent e-mails probably are automatically generated shipping confirmations telling you not to reply, because this ...


49

I think this is referred to as a "near-miss" mechanic. Artificially increasing the frequency of near-misses, or artificially inflating the prize that was nearly missed, is illegal for slot machines in many areas. Study on psychology of the near-miss


45

Priority shouldn't be numbered or substituted with characters. Traditionally they've always been a label to instruct the end user what they represent. This is what we use. A combination for Color and Label or Icon and Label. For a user with accessibility or someone using a screen reader, the priority is read out as text. Ideally, there has to be a visual ...


24

Personally, I find this really annoying and really bad UX. There is a large music equipment online store in Europe, which does it differently, and I always enjoy interacting with them. When you reply to an invoice, you do not get just customer-care@whatever.example or billing@whatever.example, no, you actually get a direct email to the customer support ...


17

There are a few reasons: Robot defense. Content sites (e.g. news sites) sometimes use these buttons to provide a rudimentary defense against content scrapers. By showing only part of the content they prevent scrapers from loading the page and parsing the article. This is obviously very crude, but it is still effective. Affirmation of user intent. ...


15

It seems that you're already leaning towards the second option there, and I agree with you. Causing delays is better than creating complete frustration. Either way, users react differently to slow responset times, as Jakob nielsen puts it: Response-Time Limits The 3 response-time limits are the same today as when I wrote about them in 1993 ...


12

As someone working in customer support, which of the following would make it easier for you to decide which mails you answer, which you forward to the technical staff, and which ones you ignore? If you got these e-mails to your contact address: Please implement feature X, we really need it! I bought product Y from you but it doesn't work Wow i liked the ...


10

Your proposal actually complicates things for the user Current user interaction: type in email tap password box type in password tap [login] button Proposed user interaction: type in email tap password button wait for notification tap notification to switch app tap login button Your idea is that there is "just a single screen" but you overlook the ...


9

First, you might reconsider the framing of the problem. The way you described it, if the user draws an object but the server doesn’t receive it, then the object was never drawn. From a UX standpoint this is precisely backwards, a system-oriented way of thinking. UX is user-centered. The system is not the authority, the user is. An object is drawn as soon as ...


8

If you're referring to the UK postcode areas, then according to https://www.mjt.me.uk/posts/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-addresses/ Warwick University has a single postcode of CV4 7AL which refers to 6,000 students. It also gives a French postcode of 75015, referring to 230,000 people. Forces' BFPO numbers are a single postcode, so a single aircraft ...


7

Think of it this way, That order you just received in the mail you didn't like one little part of it, so you emailed back with some small 'issue'. Imagine how many other people are doing the same. Now imagine the effort it would take to complain about that small part if instead you had to go through a series of pages, support tickets or something along ...


7

Quite the opposite, there are several good reasons to do it. Take a look to this article (I don't fully agree with all of it, but you'll get the gist of it) They are important for several reasons, most importantly because they allow designers to compress content on the home page. By compressing content, you fit more content in less space. This means ...


6

The postal code in the USA with the largest number of people in it is the one for El Paso, which has a little over 114,000 residents in a single code. There may be more in some other countries as postal codes vary from a single code for an entire city (e.g. South Africa) to a single post code for one or two streets (e.g. the Netherlands). Relying on a ...


6

This is a complex situation and I feel like a lot more info is needed. However, there's a part where an answer can be provided, and it's whether to mix (or not) the times. And the answer is NO. Check your own screen capture: you have 22h, then 14d and even 13m. And according to your description, these times are measuring different actions (one is for a ...


5

I had a similar situation when I was designing an accordion menu. here you can find the related article. For navigation items such as previous and next I would use the icon based on the direction i want to point. (right placed icon for next, left placed icon for previous). For other cases left aligned icons feels more familiar.


5

So the chosen answer, while good, is incorrect as regards this particular screenshot. I am actually responsible for implementing the button in the screen shot. I can't speak for every site but I can say that the thought process (as far as I know) is basically the 3rd option given by tohster. QZ only shows the read full button when you navigate directly to ...


5

Here is a supplemental answer. Dont show priority with different colors! Use Different shades of the same color 8% of men are colorblind You can change the shade of a color to prioritize or show emphasis without introducing new colors. By altering shade you can show similar emphasis than introducing different colors. *note the other strategies such ...


4

I would urge you to always give users the option to opt out. If a user doesn't want to read something they're not going to, forcing them to click on it will only become an annoyance. Think of it like a terms of service agreement. You're forced to read them even though most people don't care whats in it. Even though the developer put in code to make you ...


4

As best I can tell, this specific mechanic likely originated in video slot machines. However, I don't believe there's a specific terminology for it. The mechanic itself is rather simple, any item other than the one selected uses a psuedo-random number generator (PRNG) to determine what it is. This can either be weighted to show higher-value items or may be ...


3

Well, it's an anti-pattern actually as it totally disrupts the flow of any human being. I think it's something that is overused and IMHO can totally be ommited. One of the reasons I've heard was because some people (like marketeers) hate to sift through dozens of out-of-office mails. Another reason is probably because some companies apply a very rigorous set ...


3

I think it's vitally important there be minimal latency in operations like drawing (or any mouse driven operation), so I propose a third option: perform the draw operation immediately (on the client) but indicate that the drawn object is in a pending state. The pending state can be indicated by having the object grayed out or a special color or a special ...


3

Both the options are good but Tree navigation is recommended. My suggestion would be add the search box above the tree navigation to access the menu item quickly. User can type 3 letter in the search box to get the respective page link.


2

I submit that you can't go too far with humanization. Just look at the Ling's Cars website and how it goes crazy overboard with it...but it not only works, it has worked well. Take a look at their employees page. http://www.lingscars.com/meet-staff.php#models It's hard to be so masterfully tacky, tasteless, and make millions. But, the world's worst ...


2

Assuming that every city has a single post code and that in the extreme case every individual has its own address, we need to look at how large cities are in terms of population. The biggest city in the world is Shanghai with an estimated population of roughly 25.000.000 people. Mind that not all births may be registered correctly and take into account that ...


2

Medium have gone for the no password route and it's certainly doable despite what some might say. It's controversial but essentially what they do is shift the security focus over to the email provider and send you a link/email each time you log in so you can see something unusual. Sounds like bad UX to me though as: you end up filling people email accounts ...


2

This function does exactly that what you consider more natural; let people know whether or not people got the message through less explicit communication. It saves a crapload of confirmation messages that are just "ok". In real life, we can see if people are looking at us, how far away they are, if they're nodding or rolling their eyes. Basically, we get ...


2

Stretching reality for Dev's convenience Alan Cooper wrote about the elastic user again, in his book, About Face. The elastic user is a self-serving creation of development teams, and has little to do with the goals, abilities, and contexts of real users. From Chapter 3, page 65, of the 4th edition of About Face, Cooper describes a development team ...


2

In the vein of all good UX design, think about who is using it and what their goals are. If your user is a designer with several years of experience in Adobe products, they will expect more nuanced control and fine tuning, and will accept more of a learning curve. If, on the other hand, they are less experienced with design software and just want to create ...


2

From my experience developing e-commerce sites I know a little bit about how this happens. Rather than looking at how 'Amazon do it' in some ideal scenario we need to look at how it has happened with real small/medium sized businesses in the last few years. Imagine a bricks and mortar business with some office server running some 'Exchange' thing so that ...


2

One potential reason that I didn't see in the other answers is that the original email may contain sensitive information (perhaps an account number or something). Making it so that the reply goes nowhere could prevent this information from being inadvertently left in as part of an email chain.



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