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68

Humanization no different from any other design technique Like many other design approaches, humanizing an interface has advantages and disadvantages and as such, is correspondingly prone to overuse and misuse. I'm not a fan of humanizing as a goal. Websites are not humans, and trying to humanize a website is useful only if it actually improves user ...


41

I think this is referred to as a "near-miss" mechanic. Artificially increasing the frequency of near-misses, or artificially inflating the prize that was nearly missed, is illegal for slot machines in many areas. Study on psychology of the near-miss


25

I would say it's too humanized if it hinders the users in finding the information they visited the site for in the first place. I once visited the website of the local supermarket to find out their opening hours on a holiday. I entered every menu option i could see, but couldn't find the opening times. Instead, I found a lot of pictures of smiling ...


15

An experience is overly personal when it shares irrelevant details that get in the way of the message. Humanizing is just explaining things in terms of people rather than systems, not telling someone’s life story for no reason.


10

They don’t! As web applications are more and more packed with information, the need to hide controls have emerged. The option would be to have even longer web pages, showing a lot of redundant controls for every post as in "unfollow post, unfollow updates from user X, unlike page, still like page but don't show updates, and on and on and on. This has made ...


5

Big companies can get away with a lack of hovering, because they invent the standard for others to follow in. Take Facebook for example. Half the links there aren't advertised as links. There's just so much data on a page that they can get away with providing links to pages with zero guidance. People look forward to a standard they can use.. but most ...


4

Scrolling pattern and navigation largely depends on the information architecture and content strategy of your website. The page scroll UI pattern has been largely used to showcase features of a product and I think it has been misused in this way. In most cases, the features are not peers but are related/dependent on each other. It seems page section ...


4

I would always take the user back to where they have come from. One of the reasons is that they could be cancelling, and didn't mean to get into this page. You don't want to confuse them further by taking them somewhere else where they would have to find their way out.


4

I think you're referring to toggle switches here. That being said, Radio buttons let users select one option from two or more choices whereas a toggle switch mimics a physical switch that allows users to turn things on or off. You can also refer to these UX guidelines by Microsoft on when to use which control: Guidelines for toggle switch control ...


3

F.lux has some information that may be relevant to this situation. F.lux is a software that overlays your desktop screen and adjusts colors depending on the time of day to make it easier on the eyes. f.lux research Blue Light Affects Sleep (and here's why) We know that night-time exposure to blue light keeps people up late. We believe that f.lux ...


3

Interesting question. It depends on the maturity of your users. The scrollbar is good option to give your users a hint about the amount of content that is remaining to be viewed. By the size of the scroller handle. Showing it persistently need not be the case. As the user is interested in the content. This can appear when the user is swiping from left to ...


2

This is often people who want to show animations etc that don't know how to code and/or haven't come across any interactive prototyping tools. The benefits are that they can pitch things to stakeholders etc easier and also it can be a useful tool for communicating with devs what you are hoping to achieve interaction-wise. That said, it also leads to ...


2

Should we consider behavioral variables in the domain of the user (e.g. shopping) or behavioral variables in the domain of the product (e.g. shopping products) or both? Depends. Is not the same if you're working on a chain with many stores, a single store, a local online delivery shop, a worldwide retailer, and so on. As a general rule, the ...


2

If I was the user, I would expect to get presented with a create game screen, if I stay on that screen for 5 seconds or 5 days it shouldn't matter, when I press the create game button it should be respected and the game actually created. However, if I leave the create game screen and try to go back, it should check for games again before presenting me the ...


2

First, there is some standard. We have the QUERTY arrangement, CTRL, SHIFT, ALT and ENTER are arranged more or less the same. Your question is actually "why are not all keyboards have identical layout?". So it is the same as asking "why are not all toasters/refrigerators/ovens/cars have identical layout"? It may be all about money. Some possible answers to ...


2

I believe that what this really boils down to is that you are using the wrong control for the job. Most often when designing an interface, if you can't easily map an input to a certain control, it's not the correct control to be using. In this case while a slider might look more streamlined and attractive, you've noticed their limitation; They exist to ...


2

Well, since you ask for it, here you have a very complete study with examples and a lot of data, another very conceptual study on what they call data hallucination , reference on Circadian clock. Keep in mind this is very technical information, and while very useful, maybe a bit overkill for your needs. Also, there's something that is not being considered ...


2

I would suggest a small preloader that shows progress, for example: A couple other small tweaks that could help: if any animations happen when you open a document (for example, expanding a thumbnail to full page size), have those happen while the doc is loading wait another 1/4 second or so before showing the preloader have the preloader fade in over ...


2

Humanizing is OK as a design tool if used sparingly, though I think people are smart / cynical enough not to be fooled by it. What ever you do DO NOT ANIMATE. Sounds are even worse. This is extremely distracting to the user. The user has come to your website to perform a task and you are effectively trying to hijack their attention. All those who remember ...


2

When it begins to feel disingenuous, which is nearly always. In fact, most attempts at 'humanization' result in absurdities that people are so numb to by now they just ignore it. It's just noise at this point. Why generate more noise? Do something more productive. "Hello! Welcome to our site! What would you like to do today?" This is, for some reason, ...


2

As best I can tell, this specific mechanic likely originated in video slot machines. However, I don't believe there's a specific terminology for it. The mechanic itself is rather simple, any item other than the one selected uses a psuedo-random number generator (PRNG) to determine what it is. This can either be weighted to show higher-value items or may be ...


1

This sounds like it only applies to websites that want to sell you something. I definitely wouldn't see this coming from websites that want you to use their free product. For example, I definitely wouldn't see it coming from a site that boasts a new Javascript framework, or a site that promotes community service, etc. It also relies heavily on whether or ...


1

Problem with spinners is you dont know how far into loading you are. Some sort of loading bar could work better. A nice little trick is to actually speed up the loading bar to begin with and then slow it down towards the end to actually represent the loading data. It gives the impression 'oh i am nearly done' rather than people abandoning the download if it ...


1

I can say that for non-touch interfaces, the hover action is more of a perceived affordance because we've been so used to it on the web. Mostly, users don't know when to hover but they actually do perceive it. According to the Hover invitation pattern, we can use hover to cue the user what is going to happen next. Here's an interesting article by Bill Scott ...


1

There is generally no way for a user to know if they can reveal something by hovering. More important, there is no way to hover on the vast majority of touch screen devices. This means that hover-and-drop-down menus for instance are completely unusable. I have this problem for years trying to access connection requests on LinkedIn on my phone. You can't ...


1

Loading (especially uploading) something without the user's direct consent might look like a privacy breach, not to mention "a shift in locus of control." However, if you scan the USB and make an educated suggestion to the user, this might work really well. Like: "The xxx file on your USB card looks like the right one. Shall we use it?" Yes/Select another ...


1

The share and save links are fine because: Icons/Buttons alongside text. Knowledge of word meaning and standardised placement of links makes it an intuitive location to put them. Good colours away from the standard text colours of the page. Why the heading for the 'element' is not so good: Same colour, styles (and size?) as the top header Image ...


1

Solve the problem with a dialog Here's how it could work: you run a check for available games once again, when the user clicks the "Submit" button — no matter how long it took him to fill in the form. If at that point there's another game available, you present him with a dialog: "Meanwhile, another game has become available. Would you like to join it?" ...


1

From a quick look at the page, it would seem that one way of handling this is to issue a page wide banner/overlay which identifies errors and on-click the user is directed to the element which is wrong/missing. The element can also be highlighted.


1

Your sketch makes sense and its one of the many ways to solve the puzzle. And believe it or not, its as simple as it gets. It is possible with D3.js; if you look deeper into timeseries type of visualizations you might find an open source code or modules that would help you build it. Here's some resources for you to get started For your step line graph ...



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