Hot answers tagged

135

Yes. There is a very simple, effective heuristic that adjusts to the preference of each user. Place a check box in the warning message dialog that says: Don't show this message again Which can be improved further by stating where that dialog can be reenabled.


60

These are Confirmation messages - Windows have a fairly detailed page on their guidelines. The whole of that page is pretty useful but here's some excerpts (emphasis mine): Confirmations are most useful when the action requires the user to make a relevant and distinct choice that can't be made later. That choice often involves some element of risk that ...


26

I'm surprised nobody brought up the Mac OS X shut down dialog. It presents you with an "Are you sure?" window, but has a timer so that if the user walks away, expecting the computer to have shut down, it will while still allowing the user time to cancel.


23

You should NOT rely on hover states. Even if you’re not developing a responsive website, now that we have touch devices, the days of relying on hover states to imply "interactability" are gone. I think you have 3 options here: 1. As long as you don't have other animations, subtle movement is all you need to draw attention to the UI elements—and a user will ...


23

NNG Has a great article on Making Clickable Elements Recognizable specifically for images: Ensure smaller images enlarge when clicked. Make all elements (e.g., picture, icon, text) that are associated with each other clickable. Doing so increases the target size and improves the probability of capturing an intended click. Avoid multiple calls to ...


14

There are 3 cases. The destructive action Do you want to delete this file? Don't. Just do the action, and display a confirmation snackbar (non-blocking small widget somewhere where it is visible but not in the way of operating) that allows to cancel (then, either delay the action, or make sure you can revert it easily). The question can only be ...


11

These images simply don't look like navigation (as you admit) and won't be perceived as such. Users just don't expect oddly shaped images to be clickable. I don't think there is any magic solution to overcome that. It may be worth rethinking your design in order to better conform to user expectations rather than trying to put a band-aid on the problem. ...


11

Movement might provide you with an option. The human eye is so attuned to it that it need only be subtle. On completion of the page load you could consider a rolling increase in image size and shadow depth on each image, across the chevron from right to left. This would draw a user attention in without having to "feel" the site. You then apply the same ...


8

I'm a big proponent of not showing messages blocking users from doing what they intended to do. The UX solution with confirmation popups came from the Stone Age of computer UX practices. It originates from a correct assumption that if we have a critical resource, we should not let users damage it by an accident. However, an accident is called that way ...


8

Hover-over Highlighting on hovering is worth doing, but, as you discovered, it’s not adequate by itself since the user has to make an effort to “feel” the interface to see what it can do, rather than just look at it. Hover effects also don’t do much for tablet users. “Rectangular Arrows” If you’re sure the problem is the non-rectangular shape, then work ...


6

1. Prove your app is awesome This may be obvious, but it's the critical first step. Before asking anyone to risk their social capital, show users why their friends will thank them for the invite. Let them enjoy something about the experience, build rapport with them, convince them that it's going to be fun with other people. It also doesn't hurt to build ...


4

You should not do this. Users know about the back button. "The Back button is the lifeline of the Web user and the second-most used navigation feature (after following hypertext links)". Jakob Nielsen in 1999. Or a Firefox study in 2010: "Across Windows, Mac and Linux 93.1 percent of users clicked the button at least once over the course of a five-day ...


3

Network effects become obvious as you see your own network in the system grow. Give them reasons to play with User X. Some of these may not apply/may not be allowable depending on your game, but: If the game is competitive, share the top score or last score. If the game is cooperative, share the name of the last teammate they played alongside. Include ...


3

As per our friends here at UX.SE, I suggest using a drop shadow. It perhaps relies on the fact that it's surrounded by links anyway - but they indicate that there is something 'special' about the image by adding a drop shadow. This is not hugely different from Michael Zuschlag's answer, but turning an image into a button didn't feel right. A drop ...


3

The gesture goes back at least to 2009, when it was already being used by Apple and Google, and especially Palm (webOS). I Googled ‘swipe to delete’ and restricted the results to pre-2010. I learned that the iPhone had it in Mail, while Gmail’s mobile app had ‘swipe to archive’. But, as far as I can tell, swipe-to-perform-an-action was used most extensively ...


3

In a comment you say you're asking for male/female simply so you can address them correctly. I interpret that to mean you're corresponding with them as "Dear Mr Lastname" or "Dear Ms Lastname." So you could ask for that specific information. Here in the US we sometimes see registration forms asking users to choose "Mr" or "Ms" as a title, though these days ...


3

I think you can check mailchimp's example. When you completed your email campaign on their platform, their brand character chimp will shows up and give you a high-five. I don't remember if the chimp actually do a high-five(raise his hand) or its the whole image just pops-up. You might want to run a quick test if those character does means something for your ...


2

If we are discussing this from the perspective of doing the brand mascot I would tackle it as a two-fold process: 1. Mascot design, which will involve the character design process You will need to start with formalizing the brand characteristics that have to be infused into the mascot. This will also help with the animation. This can be handled with ...


2

Tying up Brand, Interface and Animation My source of inspiration on how to push the boundaries of Interface Design and motion graphics is Dribbble. You will see plenty of examples of two categories of animation there. One is at a more granular level, can be a logo, an interface. For example, how a hamburger icon reacts when a user taps it and morphs ...


2

I have answered a similar question before. http://ux.stackexchange.com/a/85487/57766 If this data is crucial, and you have to ask, use "Gender". Biological sex is too sensitive as a subject and you might steer some of the TA away if you use it.


2

Same person? Ideally, but nearly impossible to pull off as nearly any software project of even moderate size requires a rather diverse team. Same entity? Absolutely. The ability to create a great UX is as much about the back end as it is about the front end. This is true both for pure UI work (consumer facing UI vs. admin facing UI) as well as the product ...


2

I found an article which was published on February 20, 2012 written by Jason Mick (blogger) "Neonode Patented Swipe-to-Unlock 3 Years Before Apple" Neonode -- a small Swedish phone manufacturer was the first to deploy the technology commercially.  And it also appears to be the first to have patented swipe-to-unlock. U.S. Patent No. 8,095,879. The ...


1

I wouldn't advise doing that. User usually perceive an expanded list of options to be a drop down menu. Sideways menu might throw them off. Implementation could be challenging too especially if your app needs to be responsive. You probably have to be extra careful when you placed additional components beside the 3 buttons.


1

I think you're on the right track but what's missing and what would make this really useful is for the design to empahise key metrics I've attached a comp This is a pattern I've seen elsewhere and addresses the use case "I have a loan amount in mind and I want to see over how many months I would need to pay it back at a rate I can afford" and brings the ...


1

There are several reasons to not add a tooltip that says 'Click...': It adds no reason for the user to take an action. It provides no context. They can click anywhere on the screen at any time. Why should the be interested in clicking that particular link? What is special about it? It's non-standard approach for prompting a user to take an action on a ...


1

From professional experience, I'd recommend two categories: create and search. If you want to view, edit, or delete something, your average user will first need to search for it. If you give all 5 options: search, view, edit, delete, and create; it's unclear the order of actions the user must take. Do I go to the delete page, then the search page for an ...


1

You are asking a question about sex/gender initially, so I'll answer that first. To begin, what is the point of the data? How will you and your company use this data? For example, will it help identify what types of advertisements to display? Anyhow, it's always good to start with understanding why you are doing something in the first place. This will help ...


1

Based on the UI attached, I'm assuming that you are toying with the idea of progressive disclosure; meaning some form of user activation to reveal the items that are available. There are circumstances whereby progressive disclosure would fit slightly better, such as form filling, check out process etc. In this case (a menu), a progressive approach would ...


1

Have you created/designed any moodboards for your brand? This could help figure out the style and character of the animations. Also knowing your target demographics, personalities etc. should help. (corporate vs. young professionals vs. geeks vs. women etc.) Whatever the style you decide, don't forget that animation must contribute positively to the ...


1

Good question, my 2 cents as an e-commerce user (okay, maybe 3) Do By putting an animation in front of me, you are expecting me to pay attention to the same (maybe first time it'll be a thrill, but not everytime) when I just came here to make a purchase. I will be okay to pay attention to product features feature comparison price fall/swing if you are ...



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