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37

As per the official Google announcement, the reasoning behind this change is to try out methods which would complement new password authentication methods. To quote the post Today, you sign in to Google on a page that includes both the ‘email’ and ‘password’ fields on the same page. We’ll be gradually splitting those two fields into separate pages in ...


7

Frankly, this is contextual. For a single word, generally 2-4 letters are kept as minimum to initiate the auto complete feature. There are at least two reasons for this. One being the performance as you pointed out. There is no need to fire up a filtering call when you know that the resultant dataset will be huge. Second being, the number of results you ...


6

Official google explanation aside (as mentioned in the other answer), there is probably another work at play which goes unmentioned - using UX as stick/carrot method to promote desired behavior. Note that if you at any time previously checked the "stay signed in" checkbox, even after logging out of the Gmail the google will remember your username (via ...


5

User experience is different from usability Although this might be obvious, it provides a useful distinction for understanding how to design delightful user experience. One well-reasoned framework used by Aaron Walter (author of Designing for Emotions) is the hierarchy of user needs which is based on the similar logic to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs: The ...


4

Why not style the Email Sign-up differently than other nav items to indicate there's a hidden bar that will accordion open on click. Bonus: styling it different gives it more of a CTA feel that draws the user's attention to it. And don't forget to autofocus the name field for accessibility and keyboard users :) Email sign-up closed Email sign-up open ...


4

Google Scholar search for "haptic klm" came up with these updates to KLM: FLM (fingerstroke level model) The traditional Keystroke-Level Model (KLM) was not applicable to predict the task performance in the touch-sensitive user interface. This case study thus proposed Fingerstroke Level Model (FLM), and analyzed the inter-network mirroring game - ...


3

Function before form. People will use garbage -- and often do -- if the application is good. The better the application, the more likely I am to use it, and to continue using it. Form only comes into question when it stops people from utilizing the application or when there are multiple competitors on the market with the same function(s). Your example of ...


2

Average Joe Average Joe doesn't know how to set the default browser from the OS, so browsers provide this option so they can be sure that they've done what's necessary for the user to choose them as the default. This way they get a way bigger chance of getting users and the more users (AKA clients) they get the more money they make. Application ...


2

Let's start with your options... You have heterogenous options. That means, your options are all pretty different. Because maps are very different from ratings, which are very different from search, it's not easy for users to process a lot of heterogenous options. Compare that to homogenous options where the items are of the same kind. For 8-10 ...


2

EDIT: Based on comment that this is the only utility-nav element that works this way... It's a bit confusing to put an email sign-up form (like for a newsletter) above everything else. Seems like a way to trick people into signing up when they simply want to log in to the site - not a good way to win customer trust. More importantly, putting the form up ...


2

a) Serious websites does not have always the best UX b) Big websites have longer development cycles c) Nothing is only bad. Sliders have advantages: focus on single items, possibility to see other items, ... but usually the major user goals are something else


2

A difference should be made between exact results for auto-completion/filter and inexact. A colleague complained to me that in most cases it is very dificult for him to look for or use/mention his own profile on many sites, because when he has completely typed his name, auto-complete doesn't kick in. His name is Li. One of the most used names around the ...


2

It depends on the specific use case, but there is no agreed-upon minimum number of characters that is required before doing filtering. If too many results can get returned, limit the initial set, preferably to the most likely (if that can be determined), or some other metric like most recent. If you use Chrome, go ahead and try it. Enter a single character ...


2

Just a note to add to @merqri answer: you may consider a feature, in which user typing a filter string gets information (it can be an approximation), how many results there are. If the number of results is narrowed down to eg. five, you may show them even after two characters. Take a look at MS Excel autocomplete feature: you have some texts (strings) in ...


2

It is possible that I am not getting your requirement right, but are the radio buttons essential? Can you instead provide something like, On click of the button, you can provide the confirmation dialog, notifying the user that it is a non reversible action. Next time when user visits the page, there can be a notification label specifying that the ...


1

Since question is stated in a way it can be answerd vaguely best answer would be that it depends on combination of any number of factors. However, if we take Dieter Rams' 10 principles for good design and apply them to application design we can outline list of major factors that impact applications user engagement: 1. Is innovative App should be following ...


1

You are on the right path! The so called hedonic qualities are the WOW-factors of your application. But, there are also some costs of use, which is usability. Usability has to be good, otherwise users avoid your app. This is the baseline (or must-have). Nobody would buy your app, because it is usable. People expect it! If your must-have is good, you can put ...


1

I'll kick this off. It may not survive on SE, but this is an interesting question to identify a new kind of heuristics. Familiarity breeds solid principles Much of UX and interaction design is connected to biological solutions because biology is familiar to our brain. Using solutions that require less adjustment makes things easier to learn, if not always ...


1

Yes, there are at least 2 good reasons If you any interactive elements in the body (even an IOS-style ellipsis °°° navigator) it can be confusing to users to "tap on interactive elements, but tap anywhere else to move to the next slide". Users often tap accidentally on mobile devices, so if you decide to do this, make sure you provide a back button of ...


1

While you can re-process server side, it is a waste of your processing power. In addition, the markdown spec allows the insertion of arbitrary HTML, so unless you disable that you will be just as insecure. This forum is about UX, and your UX will be enhanced by the live preview. Out of the scope of this forum but necessary to answer your question: On the ...


1

If the arrow is to the right of the "Email Signup" link, it should point towards the link to call attention to it: Email Signup <-- Then, once clicked the arrow should point to the form, so as to indicate to the user where to look. Email Signup ^ Apologies in advance for my crude, text-only examples.


1

Other applications do it as well. They ask you to associate certain file types with it. When double clicking a file it starts the default application. There is no OS-setting for text or image editors, but there is one for each file type (txt, doc, jpg etc.). For browsers there is "make default" setting probably because web browsing is not associated with ...


1

That's a good question and easy to answer. As a UX Designer you shall think of both user's needs and business goals. Let's see what Google could win from making its great Chrome the default bowser? As simple as it may seems, it's important: Reputation. Collecting data: that's the critical reason for what can be called "browser-war". Every page you access ...



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