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37

Microsoft's MSDN Guidelines claim: Preserve user selections through navigation. For example, if the user makes changes, clicks Back and then Next, those changes should be preserved. Users don't expect to have to re-enter changes unless they explicitly chose to clear them. See source Rightly so, IMO.


34

They arrange the items depending on what you search for. I.E. searching for 'Tax' is likely to return many News results, so that is shown alongside 'web': Searching for 'Mexico Flag' is likely to return lots of images, so they set 'Images' as the next tab: Whereas searching for 'Bristol' (A city in England) returns 'maps' as the next tab: ...


10

Preserve the information when you can. Consider the 3 data entry pages as one big form that you happen to split into three. As the user completes one section/page, that part should be treated as completed as they move forward. If they move back, they should see what they saw when they left the page - the information that they entered/selected. You'll ...


6

A few different ideas come to mind. 1 - make the label color match the associated line color, so even if they overlap it's clear which label belongs to which line. 2 - Put each label in a containing div, possibly giving that containing div a border the same color as its associated line, with an opaque white background ... and possibly when a user ...


3

Be weary of mixing form buttons and navigation links. A user will likely think 'Back' button is a navigational item not a form submission. Assuming button click = server trip to save data. The confirmation page is probably the best page to put a back or 'Update' link. The summary of highlighted issues links them to areas needing respective updates. If the ...


3

Leave the value in there as an invalid state You should allow users to change the type and still keep what they wrote in value field. They might have clicked the wrong type, or want to copy what they had written. You need to communicate that the value is invalid though so I suggest you indicate this by making the value red: When the user leaves this ...


3

Every user has a timeline showing the timeslots available for allocation. The diagram shows weekdays, halfdays would probably be better for original question. Tasks for the project being planned are shown in colour; otherwise occupied timeslots are marked with grey transparent tasks. Dependencies are marked with an arrow pointing at any tasks that must be ...


2

Without looking through the internet for help it is a steep learning curve for some new users. A massive part of Apple's product is having the support to complement it, in this case the Genius Bar, and also telephone support. I first got a macbook around 6 years ago, and I also struggled to work out how to rename a folder. I achieved this learning by ...


2

I think you're right to think about users who won't be interested in watching an intro video, as quite a bit of research suggests most users don't watch them, and even onboarding should be considered a last resort (Saks, A.M. (1994). Moderating effects of self-efficacy for the relationship between training method and anxiety and stress reductions of ...


2

Is this a native mobile app or a web app? Either way, I think it's important to give users some indication about what is happening rather than leading them hanging, so if at all possible, you should help them feel their task is complete. Whether a native app or web app, it's a fairly straightforward solution to persist the data in a native app for your ...


2

This is a standard verification scenario, the most common example of which is domain verification. i.e. when setting up Google Analytics a user must paste a meta tag in the homepage on the site to prove they have access. The key is to require a verification or confirmation step on Site A, and to make sure it's obvious from the interaction design that the ...


1

Even though you will save space by combining both fields onto a single page, I would be inclined to present each field on it's own screen. The user elects to pay The user is prompted for password - the user enters password The user is prompted for OTP This way each page could have it's own intro text and help links if required. Otherwise you would need ...


1

When they enter all their details and click on pay, show them the password field as well as the OTP field. At the same time you should send the OTP to their mobile. When they click confirm or submit, they should be able to do the transaction. You are reducing the number of clicks. You are doing all operations on a single page. No complexity for the user ...


1

One option would be to give the user the ability to hide one or more of the lines, and the ability to display hidden lines again. Postscript: Based on what dayluloli stated: The lines are often close together and overlap. The legend should follow the end-of-line. Thus, the lines and legend should be presented in the graph. With the four lines in the ...


1

To a certain degree, the system can handle the problem itself - if an integer is changed to a string, the number can be converted into a string automatically (in the image above to the string "123"). In this case no user intervention is required. If a conversion is not possible, there should be a warning message. You say, the user "can change data types ...


1

Google does a lot of testing, but that doesn't mean they've tested this issue. The use case that was described in the original post was "I use the images function on a regular basis.", so frequently that the text was no longer read, only the position of where the link is located. But location changes and causes the issue. This breaks the usability rule of ...


1

It's platform dependent according to Nielsen Norman Group. Summary: Should the OK button come before or after the Cancel button? Following platform conventions is more important than suboptimizing an individual dialog box. That said, It's correct on Apple devices, but not OK on Android/Windows Phone devices.


1

Why not embed the prerequisites into the modules themselves? That way you can see all prerequisites at one place. No lines to other places, no other place to look up associations. I added one possible draft using a drop-down box for addding prereqs and an X button which will remove it again. Depending on further factors (size of list, knowledge about ...


1

Everything looks click-able on a mobile device :-P What I don't understand, is your desire to drag the user into every corer of your app. As I see it, the graphs will give the (novice) user sufficient information. I'm pretty sure that more advanced users would tap the label or the graph if they wanted to read more about the details. But I'm not sure, ...


1

There is an interesting article written by the Nielson Norman group which discusses the time spent reading which suggests a need for more relevant and appropriate information to retain attention. Whilst not directly appropriate to your question does back up your own experience. Nielson Norman Group Article - How little do users read? Research is thin on ...


1

One should simply not use the same term for items that are not the same. Users will not understand why they get different functionality between the two instances of the term. Filtering functionality is not uncommon in apps, so many users will understand the term. For those who don't, are tooltips possible for the control, or explanatory text in the UI?



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