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97

You are totally right As with many other devices (eg the QWERTY keyboard) the hot/cold tap persists not because it's the most usable design, but because of: Cost since proper temperature control requires an electromechanical feedback loop design, or (worse solution) careful thermostat calibration which needs to be periodically adjusted. This drives up the ...


28

I suppose it's mostly a question of how much money you want to invest into your fittings. In most cases you'll have one pipe for hot and one for cold water. The knobs then just open and close those pipes – I can hardly think of any easier / cheaper solution. However there are actually different solutions that do exactly what you describe: Visiting Canada ...


17

I can honestly say I have never seen a shower that has separate hot/cold knobs like you describe, and I've lived everywhere up and down both the east and west US coast. Every shower I've ever seen has two concentric wheels. The inner one controls temperature while the outer one controls pressure. Here's what they look like (although the labels around the ...


13

Observations Browser implementation of tooltips is not predictable. Some browser show tooltips immediately, and some show them after a delay. The position and styling of the tooltips is not predictable across different browsers. Users often miss native browser tooltips because (1) they are small; and (2) most browsers require users to pause the cursor ...


11

Hot and cold knobs work great, and everyone intuitively understands that turning the knob makes more water come out, ie more water pressure. The practical reason is it gives maximum control with the fewest parts. Also, the range for usable water pressure is not very large, and dedicating an entire knob to it seems to be a waste. Your solution would require ...


10

They don't any more. They used to because it is the most mechanically simple implementation of temperature control. However, this is only historical. None of the other answers mention the legalities of this. The International Building Code (what most US local codes are modeled on these days) mandates that all new shower controls must be temperature ...


9

There's a simple and classic solutions for this. You just add a tiny icon letting them know there's a helpful tooltip waiting for them: There a are many occasions where you want to help first time or rare users, but you don't want to clutter the screen with lengthy explanations. Tooltips are a greta solution, but as you mentioned, many people are not ...


5

One thing I’ve seen more websites doing is changing the mouse cursor to the "help" style: Try it on W3Schools. This real-time change can help a lot because it lets users know that the area where they have the mouse is special. This is best combined with redundant display options that detect the user’s situation and show the tooltip in a way that’s going ...


4

Don't do it There are several reasons: Pull-to-refresh is a very common mobile UX idiom. You are asking users to unlearn the idiom and learn some other behavior in its place, which is going to feel unintuitive at best and annoying at worst. You are asking the user to slide vertically to delete horizontally, which is going to feel very weird since there ...


3

The example you're providing might work well if you have the space for it, but something like Chosen could work even better. In the example below, Chosen is the version on the right: This should also be rather intuitive to users, since this is how e.g. email clients behave when adding recipients.


3

You're right in not making decisions based upon your own assumption. What you could do is usability testing with actual people. The best test would be conducted with 5-7 (or more) testpersons from the actual targeted audience in an environment they will be using the app or at least in an environment where they are comfortable. If you don't have time to ...


3

I found it very amusing reading all these answers which I assume were written by people in the US. I live in the UK and visit France and Spain very regularly. I believe a resident of any of these countries would be appalled to find a hot/cold shower in a hotel room in Europe - I have not seen such a thing for many years. All the talk about the the ...


2

I think Facebook login (or any firm login) should not be mandatory. eCommerce is all about trust. Your users may trust your firm, but may not trust Facebook or others. Therefore, making firm's login mandatory may lead to a customers loss. On the other hand, some users would appreciate not to have to fill once more the usual personal fields. In this view, ...


2

Some systems in South America (called "calefón" in my country) require certain level of pressure to get the hot water running (for example, you can turn the knob 30º without the "calefon" getting activated in order change the water temperature), so in that case it's a device limitation.


2

There are some sound answers here but I would like to add to it by saying that if you are that dependent on users reading what is in your tooltips, it perhaps should not belong in tooltips, but already visible for your user.


2

If you mean apps to use in your development, yes, there are many commercial and pretty good tools like AppSee, Heatmaps.io and so on. I don't know and I doubt there's anything free other than free trials for those commercial apps. If you mean research, there's a lot scattered around the web. The old and classic mobile UX research by Mozilla is always a good ...


2

You could use chat bubbles in a horizontal list (which is technically a tab) like on the facebook messenger app, with a small number within a circle to indicate the amount of unread messages Here's a chat plugin i found quite user friendly. Even being quite feature heavy, it seems easy to use. might give you some ideas www.spot.im


2

The examples you give are all achievable using first order set logic without the need for nested operations. They can be described using a form with 3 simple fields: Using this interface, the set operations you describe can be created as follows (click image to expand): If you also need nested operations, this is also doable...leave a comment and I ...


1

I would divide it in public and private. BTW I'm not aware of mobile conventions (maybe top buttons should be inside a hamburger menu to save space or to have 1 control with all the possible actions in that page). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups An alternative would be to make the "Choose participants dialog" a ...


1

I can't really see the difference between this and a boolean rule/query builder, e.g. like the one described here. Let's use cars and look at your examples: Include red trucks. Include red cars and trucks as long as they're of Chevrolet make. Include red Chevrolets and Chevrolet trucks, but exclude vintage cars. download bmml source – ...


1

Just an idea that might help or give an other perspective. Old conventions are often intuitive until the point where your target audience is to young to remember. Analog clocks work by rotating the wheel, just one wheel. You have to keep turning it until you reached the right time. Intuitive? Most likely, but efficient? Not really. To perhaps make it more ...


1

App design is new as a profession so I have borrowed wisdom from a much older profession for getting design perspective: method acting. User stories, psychographics, and personas are very common approaches to the initial/ideation phase of app design. I've found that they are helpful descriptive approaches, but I've found it more powerful to spend time ...


1

I think the following activities can help to expand the perception of every UX professional: Usability testing (as much as you can) Constant research (new studies, trends, recognized blogs, etc) Participating in communities like this! Knowing your app use cases.


1

In Australia, most showers have separate hot and cold knobs, and the more modern remainder are 'mixing batteries' like what tillinberlin describes. There are some big UX problems with hot/cold taps: When turning on the shower it takes time to adjust the taps to get the right temperature and pressure. People must be taught to turn on the cold tap first and ...


1

I think Interaction Design1 offers quite a solid classification. Evaluation strategies include: User testing - any method that requires users. This includes controlled lab experiments, interviews, questionnaires, user observations, field observations, remote testing, etc. Inspections - done by experts, largely by means of reason. Includes cognitive ...


1

I don't think deleting letter by letter is a good thing : User doesn't want to pull for 10s if he wrote a long word/sentence. Besides, the idea to coming back few step backward by deleting some characters in the search is nice, just do it according to the size or syllabe by syllabe. EDIT : Don't forget to add a simple visual content to make the gesture is ...


1

It's hard to analyze the full interaction because the clip doesn't show how the selector showed up (did it slide in? load with the page? appear after user clicked on the dropdown control at the top?) Based on the very limited clip: The page locks in the user's attention. The user is focused on the top where you have the Please select control and ...


1

This isn't necessarily your responsibility. This is Jony Ive's responsibility now. You're using a native element and we can really only assume that the person is somewhat familiar with the device they are using. Do you know if the person performing the task regularly uses an iPhone? Were they testing on an actual iPhone or an emulator? About the only ...


1

Based off of the clip, I would suggest closing the selector if it is open and the user clicks again. In doing this, it would give your users some kind of visual feedback. This would lead them to explore and see what changes, which would then help them notice the iOS selector at the bottom of the screen.


1

The screenshots make it a bit clearer, but it's still hard to understand how the filters change, how many options there are, etc. Here are two approaches. The left one assumes you have a reasonably small number of categories. The right one assumes you have a large number of categories (e.g. Yelp or Amazon) and it'd be impractical to list them all out. ...



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