Hot answers tagged

102

If a user can't find an option or feature, then it doesn't exist There has to be some means by which a user who is looking for a feature can reasonably expect to find it, and by which users can browse features to learn what is available. Well-designed menus are really good at this. Clusters of related buttons and displays too, especially with tool tips. ...


30

You'd probably needs someone who works at Microsoft to answer this one, but from the outside observer, there are a number of reasons why this might be the case: They cater for a very diverse group of users: think about the audience and users of Microsoft products and perhaps this is a way to accommodate all the different ways that people might use the ...


12

Often this can be summed up with 2 words. Backwards Compatibility The original Word users likely migrated from WordPerfect.. Which was very keyboard focused cause when you type that's where your hands are. Thus when Word first had its menus and toolbars they had to support hot keys too. When they came out with "personalized menus" where options not used ...


11

Keyboard shortcuts The fastest. Tool bars It's the fastest if it is impractical to set a keyboard shortcut for everything. And if it wasn't an editor, people sometimes just don't want to use a keyboard for whatever reasons. Context menus They are more likely showing what the users intended to do. Changing the tool bars too much on the fly may distract ...


8

It's simply very painful to remove features from established software. Featuritus is often a marketing advantage. The initial redundancy of being able to invoke an action via menu or keyboard is proven useful pattern - some people prefer to use the mouse (menu) and some prefer the keyboard. The menus are more discoverable but the keyboard is faster. This ...


4

I would not recommend using VR to simulate your daily life activities. Let me reflect my experience with VR so far. I have so far had 3 VR Headsets (Can't call them headsets to be honest, since they are all Google Cardboards) and I have also used an Oculus Rift. Each one of these, I must have used maximum for 5 days. They are based upon constant head ...


4

Microsoft's Jensen Harris wrote an extensive series of blog posts about the MS Office 2007 UI design as it evolved, which went into a great deal of detail about (what was then) the radical new ribbon design, why they kept what they kept, and why they changed what they changed. Obviously a little dated now, but well worth a read.


3

Maybe it can be some sort of substitute as the field of VR Therapy makes advances. ( See TechCrunch or WSJ for example.) However, often VR is not a substitute for real life experience but an augmentation of actual experiences, i.e. AR, not VR. My answer can only be opinion based (although I did work in VR during its first uprising in the 90's) and I ...


3

I come across this all the time, so I have a prepared answer for this. We are not building solutions for the benefit of the developers - we are building them for the benefit of the users. Making something easy to use is rarely easy to do. So if you want an easy, usable solution, it might be difficult to do. Option 1 - difficult for the team to build and ...


3

You have heard the expression "Form follows Function"? You mention usability over design, but I suspect what you really meant was usability over visual design. Usability (function) always comes before visual design (form). If a third to half your participants struggled (even if they eventually figure it out) then this would indicate you have a usability ...


2

Many ways to access functions are always good. Take this text editor as example. You can write bold text at least in three different ways. Select the B icon on the toolbar. Type Ctrl+B. Write two asteriscs (*) before and after the text to be emphasized. Nice.... I recently had one of the worst user experiences using latest MS Word versions (2010 ...


2

Warning: This is an opinion and have no way to demonstrate the validity of the answer other than the Duck Test or Occam's Razor. It's not that they don't know what they're doing. They did have easy to find logout buttons before. Now they don't, for what it appears to be another chapter in corporate wars The whole philosophy behind this is to keep the ...


2

Generally, I like it. One suggestion, depending upon number of "Event Staff" you have, "Add a team member" button will keep scrolling down and down. If your list of staff us is 5-8 members long, that might do but for longer list, consider putting a static button upfront (probably as a small button on the right side or after "People invited & their ...


2

If you look at it more closely, most of the redundancy consists of different "access vectors" to the same functionality. You may be able to achieve the same thing through the menu, through a context menu, a toolbar button or a hotkey – but you are unlikely to find multiple menu items or multiple hotkeys for the same thing. These access vectors cater to ...


2

scottishwildcat's answer already touched on Jensen Harris's excellent blog posts about the "new Office UI" (the Ribbon debuting in Office 2007), but there is one article which I think is particularly pertinent, titled "No Distaste for Paste": Early on, we were toying with the idea of not having buttons for Cut/Copy/Paste in the Ribbon. Everyone “knew” ...


2

I think you are talking about something which is available in jQuery, which they call "Easings" https://api.jqueryui.com/easings/ In this website the movement is communicated using a diagram which animates the movement when clicked. There are variations which include things like bounce and elasticity. Basically the variable you are missing is the rate of ...


2

I don't think you are missing anything, the above site 'http://us.pg.com/ or http://www.wacom.com/' options are handled very well. My analysis on apple.com, country selection must be in new page because the country list is more than 140+. Its hard to handle such a big number selection on same page. My suggestion on providing the Country selection option ...


2

This is a pretty common interaction on a lot of shopping websites and the norm is pretty much always: If user clicks/taps on open icon (default), turn open icon to filled icon and add to favorites. If user clicks/taps on filled icon, turn filled icon to default and remove from favorites. Moving the products to a separate section during the interaction ...


2

Don't move it automatically. If I'm halfway down the list and think "Oh, I like this one!" and click the star, I would be very frustrated if it disappeared from sight. I would instead just provide feedback that it was added to the user's favorites list by filling in your "favorites" icon. Additionally, provide a way to filter by favorites. If the thing I ...


2

Autocomplete functionality is great for advanced users who don't look at the keyboard whilst typing, however lots of users need to look at the keyboard. This can cause them to not even notice the autocomplete suggestions, this type then hit tab or return. A UX pattern of search then select for a list (ideally not a <select> one) with a "don't see your ...


2

Utility Navigation definition from Nielsen: Summary: Utility navigation consists of secondary actions and tools, such as contact, subscribe, save, sign in, share, change view, print. These activities strongly affect website visitor satisfaction, user experience, and engagement. Put utilities where people expect and need them. Primary vs ...


2

For processes where the output is indeterminate, use a progress bar which is Continuous/ Indeterminate. Here's a good example to follow for different types of Progress: I believe the 4th transition above showcasing types of Progress bars answers your question regarding how to transition between Indeterminate to Determinate and vice versa. One can even ...


2

Why do you think interacting with select boxes is annoying? Remember not all mouse clicks are to be considered bad. Select boxes have been around for a very, very long time, and are a neat concise way to select a value. You can also set a default value (if it makes sense), which could be beneficial to the user because they may not even need to interact with ...


1

Yes - It is because it helps to decreases eye fatigue, but also helps make grays and blacks on your screen seem richer. It is called bias lighting: https://www.avforums.com/article/do-i-need-bias-mood-lighting-tv.10747 http://www.howtogeek.com/213464/how-to-decrease-eye-fatigue-while-watching-tv-and-gaming-with-bias-lighting/ http://lifehacker.com/why-...


1

One thing that is missing and you should have is - information on total number of pages available. In your screen shot user does not know how many pages there are when the grid loads. Knowing that information is good but you still need validation. I suggest an alternate solution. I think this is simpler UI , no explicit go to buttons , it keeps controls ...


1

Did you consider using other ways to select a page number? One of the challenges of allowing a person to type into a field is they may not even type a number, so you will need to consider all sorts of other types of data entry field validation. If you use an alternate way for selecting the page, which doesn't involve typing, then the person cannot enter ...


1

You could try presenting the primary hotel and alternate as cards, with the primary accommodation presented as the top card. Show some details of the hotels on each card. Label the primary hotel card "Primary hotel" or "planned accommodations" or something like that, and make the primary hotel card background color brighter than the secondary one. Label the ...


1

Avoid changing paradigms, as this is worse for user expectations. If a user is tracking progress with the progress bar you have provided, having it suddenly change to an indeterminate state will not be satisfying (in my opinion). Suddenly all information on progress goes away? I would think that things are going bad. To me this is worse than a progress ...


1

Both options seem valid for me, it all depends on the business rules behind it. You cannot compare a content website like youtube to a brand website like wacom of pg. A brand website usually create this kind of pages because they have different localised website across the regions. The websites might look really different in terms of look and feel and ...


1

I would add a ♡ when the item is not selected, then give it an action color like this ♥ when its favorited. Use a bright success color like green or yellow or anything else that works with your theme or template, when the user clicks add some transitions or animations so that the color eases into the outlined heart and the user registers the ...



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