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37

The book On Writing Well (a great book,) suggests making things like these plural. In the book, he talks about how to avoid the gender problem when talking about men/women. (By calling them people.) For example, when talking about a specific user, instead of saying "when he clicks on the button..." you'd say "when they click on the button...", or the passive ...


26

This conclusions from Michael Hughes might be helpful for you to decide when to include a screenshot and when not to: So where does this leave me? I am going to be more open to including screen shots where they do the following: Help reassure the user that where they are in the UI is the right place to be Help call attention to a specific ...


23

You could consider changing the wording of the values: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


18

Firstly, don't auto-highlight the first option like shown in the screen cap. Then dim down the auto-suggest area when the user is just typing. If they hit the down arrow or hover over the auto-correct area, it will brighten back up to its current state. Some text could be added to give the users some instructions, but I don't think they'd be needed.


14

The problem isn't with your autocomplete control, it's with your form. Check out how Trello does this. 1. Before you begin, the input field explains what you can enter Note that the form is titled "Add Members" and allows you to input multiple email addresses and select multiple people in the list. 2. When you begin typing, "searching..." appears to ...


11

Keep it simple: Send to: User Admin Manager It is quite common in English to skip articles at all in titles, etc.


10

Include all items, and here is why: People can compute positive words easier than negative ones. For example: Do you want a part of my sandwich? or Do you not want most of my sandwich?


9

Note that "I am" is also not grammatical if two people are operating the machine as a pair. Quite simply Choose destination for image: {User, Administrator, Manager} Send image to: {User, Administrator, Manager} Send image to User is not bad grammar. Rather, it is an example of the condensed dialect of English that is used in newspaper headlines and ...


9

Because these instructions are supposed to be read after the user has tried and failed to interpret a field, not read first of all by every user. In the case of the Twitter examples, these texts often don't actually explain how to fill in the field, but rather how to make a decision. That is, they are supposed to be read only if a user struggles with a ...


8

Nothing. People don't read directions. ;o) I'd suggest making the 2 step process a major visual. something like this: Your intro paragraph here --------------------------------- | | | this is a two step process! | | | | 1) [button] | | | | 2) ...


8

There are a lot of things you could try, here's a simple one: Only provide the first step on the page, when it's clicked take them to another page for step 2. You could also do this on the page showing/hiding layers. Just make sure there's a way to go back/reset.


7

Because you have a bunch of fields in rows, each doing the same thing (from what I can see from your screen grabs), you will want to handle this with an introductory message. Something along the lines of: All fields below are optional. You may skip this step by taking the [add your action here] Another takeaway for you, it wouldn’t be clear to me that the ...


6

We must distinguish between negation and negative wording. Both of these work very well: [ ] Are you happy [ ] Are you sad But none of these: [ ] Are you not rich [ ] Are you not poor Likewise, the context is important. Let the meaning of the check mark be consistent. Like this: [ ] Install software [ ] Add start menu item [ ] Add ...


6

I'd say this perfectly acceptable. I typically do the same thing when prompting a user to select one or more items. I just use the plural of the word, rather than add a (s) at the end. The idea here is to make it easier for the user to read and understand the label. If making it more grammatically correct makes it more confusing or more cumbersome for the ...


6

You should use the screenshot in below case When you cant explain the screen in words properly i.e. if there are more similar option on the screen which might confuse the user. When user will get navigate from one screen to another screen which are non consistent i.e. major UI change or you are redirecting user to different application. Also, you ...


5

I think "None of the above" should not be a checkbox since by virtue of being a checkbox placed along with other options, it inherently means it can also be "checked" in addition to the other checkboxes, which can be lead to an invalid state. For example, what if the user checked "Vanilla", "Strawberry", "Butterscotch" and also "None of the above"? My ...


5

For a decent accessible website the instructions should always be before the field. They're not just there for typical users, but also are important cues for accessibility. For example: Screen readers will hit the description / hint before reading the form field details so the user will know what is needed to complete the field successfully. If the hint ...


5

I'm assuming that the full usage is /r <message>, but this answer also applies if it's /r <username>, or /r <username> <message>. You could put the space followed by a placeholder - I'd recommend typing the instructional part in one font, and the actual code to type in a fixed-width font which will make the space more clearly ...


4

In your particular example and in most cases the positive statements would be better. That's purely because they're easier to understand. As bad as it sounds, one of the common reasons to do the opposite is to trick or encourage the user to make the decision you want out of them. e.g. [ ] Check here if you do not wish to participate in the organ ...


4

From what I’ve read in your comments to other answers, users click on a link, then go off and do a bunch of stuff in other windows, then they need to understand and remember that they need to go back to the original window at a certain point and click a second link. You have no way to automatically prompt the user do the second click –no way for the system ...


4

JotForm developer here. These hints are mostly used to help users with the input type or a few examples of a correct entry. It will be confusing and crowded for users to see help texts right under the question. We usually want them to focus, only on the question. When they come to answer asked question they can read a simple hint about the expected entry or ...


4

Do all commands end with a space? Do they have to end with a space? Why is the space necessary? Could or should the programming be altered so that /r is recognised as a unique valid command? If the space is really necessary, tell the user that. But don't use a non-standard symbol, which the middle-dot is. Click or type /r followed by a space to respond. ...


4

The best thing to do is make the application self-explanatory, so people just know what and where to click. And on those screens where that doesn't work you can include the manual in the application directly, add hints, example images, animations, whatever needed to understand the task. Having the application and the help in the same place will alsp help ...


3

You should use neither of them. When you are referring to vertical content, you should say "scroll up" or "scroll down". Vertical content movement has been used for decades now, and there is no good reason to change the terminology. Yes, you are swiping, but you shouldn't refer to how it is done, just what you want to achieve. We say "click on X" not ...


3

Yes. Apple use the terms "swipe up and swipe down: http://www.apple.com/iphone/iphone-5/tips/ The Apple HCI Guidelines may be of use here in conveying defined actions: On avoiding redefining gestures: ...


3

If you have to have both links on the same page, a better idea would be to have two columns with big headers of "First Step" and "Second Step". People read left to right then down. They'll see that it's a two step process at a glance. However, the bare minimum you can do is label your links "First Step" and "Second Step", if they're not already. :-).


3

To me, the most logical place to put the second link is in the installer because that's when it's needed prior to proceeding. The user would Click on Link 1, it gets the installer going When ready, the installer prompts the user with a message like "A second click [or a confirmation, or whatever you want to call it] is needed before proceeding. At this ...


3

You could add the exact contents (in quotes) of the field as another line below the autocomplete options. Add a scrollbar if necessary, but the bottom (exact contents of the field) should always be shown. This gives an affordance that a custom entry is allowable. See the Gmail "label as" autocomplete as an example.


3

You've got a few issues with microcopy here. First of all, as Kevin has mentioned, the text-entry fields aren't labeled. Secondly, it's unclear whether all 5 names must be filled in order to proceed (though it could be in the part of the screen you didn't share). Thirdly, your actual question can be solved with a line similar to "Choose a Twitter contact or ...


3

Don't rely on the instructions, the better option is to develop self-documented form. These kind of forms are obvious for users and error-proofed. The means for developing such forms are: Right label names to support user's mental model Right controls. HTML5 supports a variety of shaped controls for emails, numbers, date, etc. Use placeholders for the ...



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