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-2

Several address validation API's (FedEX , UPS) return a normalized uppercase address that can become memorized into autofill settings. EX: 124 Main Street -> 124 MAIN ST


2

So, does anyone know where this behaviour comes from in the first place? I can answer that subquestion from personal experience. If a form asks for my credit-card number and asks for my name "as it appears on the credit card" (or words to that effect) then I obediently enter my name as it appears on my card — which is in all caps. If I'm ...


4

If that is the way they have entered it, don't mess with it. Soft validation at the time of capture is recommended. In the extreme they may be using "assistive" technology and we do not want to offend anyone. I worked for many years with customer data for a major bank. The data would be captured on many systems, and a wide range of quality issues ensued. ...


49

Users enter information in upper case either intentionally, or unintentionally (e.g. they happen to have CAPSLOCK activated). Several other answers mention a variety of reasons for why the user may be doing so intentionally. If it is unintentional, then the user probably wants to know about it, and correct it. As others have mentioned, designing an ...


4

Simple, give people an explicit example of how the question should be answered... What does the Professor say at the beginning of most episodes? An example example... "Good news everyone!" If the user did not enter quotes you could manually insert them. If you detect that there is a high level of upper-case letters (e.g. detecting common words ...


14

This is because early Teletype and computer systems had no provision for lower case. Mixed case Teletypes came on the market in the 1930's, but the standard US military Teletype of World War II only printed in upper case. The idea that official communications and reports should be in all caps worked its way deep into the culture. Up through the 1970's ...


6

Only theories: people still stuck in front of DOS based systems may have the CAPS LOCK key on permanently. lawyers/solicitors are creatures of habit and still tend to format many of their documents as if it were 1982 and everyone was using IBM Selectric typewriters (I used to work for judges and getting them out of that mindset was always a chore) people ...


10

For names, all capital letters is sanitization normalization. Take the name "Macdonald" for example. It can also be spelled "MacDonald". If you aren't typing your own name into a form, this kind of error is very common and can cause problems. The client (client of your client) could be insulted or it could cause legal issues (possibly). "MACDONALD", ...


11

I used to work for a company which paid for a behemoth third party software. So on a typical work day, Peggy would enter a client name and save it to the database, hunky-dory. On the following work day, Donna would need to search for this client and do further processing. Cool, so Donna would use the search box and not find the client. Hmm, better call ...


5

It sounds like the users are not fully aware of how their entries will used. You may want to provide an example of a typeset and formatted entry for them to review before they submit the text (just like the Stack Exchange sites do) so they can see how the entered text will be interpreted.


14

[Flippant] End users are strange creatures, period. There's no accounting for what makes sense to them and what they'll do (even with explicit instructions). [/flippant] A good rule of thumb is to never trust that the data entered by end users is reliable and accurate, even if you give them explicit instructions and train them on how to correctly use the ...


75

I've seen this occasionally in usability tests. When I ask it's usually because they have filled in many paper forms where there is a request to 'fill out in block capitals' or similar — so they think that is the default for all forms. With solicitors I imagine there may be similar issues where court forms have to be filled out in specific formats. Have ...


1

You could chunk the complexity into a lower limit and an upper limit, and optionally a difference between the two if this is useful. Increasing the lower limit above the upper limit automatically shunts the upper limit along, while decreasing the upper limit below the lower limit automatically shunts the lower limit down. If the user has manually entered a ...


2

You can keep hidden the two input controls, and show them only when the user taps one of the extremes: User should be able to drag extremes, which may also contain the current values.


1

Wizards are very good ui patterns for :- 1) collecting info from user in a sequential (as well as non sequential manner) like a hotel/flight booking 2) Grouping of related input in each step like:- Product customization Name, shipping address in one step, Payment details in next step Summary and confirmation in final step. 3) It provides user ...


4

The first thing I'd recommend is to divide the inputs into digestible chunks. Make sure you're not presenting all of the open fields on one form. Bring the user's focus to one section at a time. For example, use gentle highlights or outlines on the first section, and disable or even hide the next sections. The second things I'd recommend is to acknowledge ...


0

I don’t think you understand the purpose of UTF-8 very well. It is just an encoding that allows you to store all kinds of characters. Choosing the encoding is more a technical decision and since you are creating a multi-lingual application and have the ability to choose UTF-8 it looks like the encoding you need. It is your application that decides what to ...


1

You should never limit it, unless you have a very good reason. The users can sometimes innovate in unsuspected ways (it is said that tea bags where for test, and the consumers began to ask it in that way). Comments: A big NO, unless your system has some very strange use. You could wanna talk about a Greek person (say Socrates: Σωκράτης) in Spanish ...


2

Really interesting problem. Hopefully this solution is self-explanatory. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups EDIT It wasn't self-explanatory. The range at any given time is one of: 0us -> 1us 1us -> 10us 10us -> 100us 100us -> 1ms 1ms -> 10ms 10ms -> 100ms 100ms -> 1s Clicking on "shorter" or "longer" alters ...


17

Another option is a logarithmic slider, like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This is appropriate when the value can span multiple orders of magnitude, but the number of significant figures is low. It will not allow the user to select between, say, 500 ms and 501 ms, so I suspect it might not be what you ...


0

Here's an older article (2007) on Mouse vs. Direct-Touch for tabletop displays. Back in university I saw a number of papers that compared the speed and accuracy of different input methods in completing certain tasks. I suspect that there have been more modern papers that have revisited these experiments.


3

I don't know how easy this would be to do in Javascript, nor whether it would be appropriate for your particular application. In an app I've worked on, our design team solved this by having a slider and a specialized text field. The slider covers the typical range of the parameter, but the text field allows a much larger range, and you can click and drag ...


6

Using many input controls with different measurments is rather not optimal, because user will spend time to decide, which one fits to him. You may trim and move x100ns outside edit: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If odd value is entered, after leaving focus it is corrected to odd (lesser or bigger). Also in ...


32

I've taken the time to draw some wireframed examples that might help you decide on how to design your time-picker control. Below you can see 3 screenshots which show (IMAGE 1) a time-picker control for all units, an increment button, decrement button, numeric input field and unit picker dropdown (if needed.) IMAGE 2: The idea is that you set it up so that ...



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