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2

Neither seem consistent The first big difference I see appears when the user have a list of maybe 15 items and they enter the page to add another one, I don't think it's a good idea to make them scroll to reach the New Item button. In the other hand placing the New Item button in the top isn't very familiar, plus the input point would descend 1 place to ...


1

The answer to the question is based on the fact that whats more important to your users, for them their old items in the wishlist might mean more to them and they would want them at the top (and add the new ones to the end of the list). The another approach, which I can say is more preferable in case of wishlist is, the newer the entry the more it is ...


0

The form of the input field its self should be indicator enough to show how much text is or will be expected in the field: If your expecting a short input => use a single line text field. If your expecting a larger amount of input => use a multi line text field Depending on the amount of text use two, three or more lines for the multi line text field. ...


0

I would use the title to allow the user to hover over the input and view all of the text. Example: <input type="text" title="something that exceeds the width of the box" value="something that exceeds the width of the box">


0

I like how it is implemented in Google Calendar app (MIUI). There are two spinners for picking date-time. That's how it looks: When you set date-time in the first picker, the second one is set automatically to +1 hour.


3

Consider separating out the number entry from the units


2

A green "Record was added successfully" message at the top after the user has clicked "Add Author". This will give the user peace of mind. Something like this. It would be best to refresh the table as this happens. Otherwise the user may attempt to add the same record again, causing duplicates. You can use something like the Yellow Fade Technique which ...


2

I believe it is wrong to give a warning that the caps lock is on because after all if a user already typed in his email/username before entering his password he probably knew its on. Additionally some people have passwords with many capital letters in them so they use the caps lock instead of the shift key. Its not your responsibility to tell a user to ...


1

This is quite interesting question to be answered. It is the very first heuristic by Nielsen Norman which states "visibility of system status- the system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time". I want to focus on responsibilities of UX practitioners, we should always see things from ...


2

Showing on the screen that Caps Lock is ON is a good practice. This is because you never know which actions user will perform while handling your system/website. Consider a novice user by mistakenly pressed caps lock and as it is not shown on the screen he is trying to enter the data/password. At the time of submitting he will surely be frustrated and ...


27

Indicating the caps lock is on is a design pattern used for passwords. When the passwords are hidden and every character is only represented by a dot, users might not know they're typing capitals where they shouldn't. It's easy to overlook the fact your caps lock is on. For example, I'm used to typing with ten fingers. While typing my elbows are set quite ...


3

I think the feature is very useful for password fields where you cannot see what you are typing and it gives you comfort to know you are typing the intended characters. Of course, most keyboards have a led that is on when you have the caps lock active, but it's nice to be reminded in the context of the form. This is a good practice because most password ...


0

Depending on the number of options, you could go with a graphical drop-down list option like the following. Tapping/clicking toggles whether that item is selected. This doesn't work very well with very long lists, though.



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