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3

No. I do not thing this is a good alternative to captchas. There are several goals that I think need to be achieved in order to be considered as an alternative. As Seamless As Possible When designing a captcha or a captcha alternative, it's very easy to lose sight of this goal. You have to keep in mind that we're purposely blocking users from doing what ...


17

Ironically, I could not get by myself what bgeigr meant, but almighty Google helped me out: So this captcha is quite easy for computers to guess, yet may be hard for humans. And bear in mind that Google is using an error model for common typos (letters replaced by those adjacent on the keyboard etc.) If you program your computer to only consider ...


2

This would be incredibly easy for a computer to determine. The thing is to not go head-to-head with a computer on its own turf. A hacker can go through millions of permutations per second. Any form of l337 speak or other variation would be decoded in a heartbeat. Literally. (If that). EDIT: A program will check to see if the word is in a dictionary. If not ...


14

I couldn't believe that I could Macaulay uesdnatnrd what I was radioing: the phenomenal power of the human mind. According to a research team at Cambridge Nerviness, it doesn’t matter in what order the letters in a word are, the only iprmoatnt thing is that the first and slat letter be in the right pilau. The rest can be a tootle mess and you can still ...


23

tl;dr A good captcha would need (ideally) to offer the best possible protection (difficult to get for a computer) and ease of use (easy to get for a human). But captchas aren't good at this and "typoCaptchas" doesn't seem to improve them. Questions can be rearrenged quite easily and then if the question is easy enough for people is probably easy enough for ...


5

Would Typocaptcha result in a better or worse user experience when compared to CAPTCHA? It doesn't really matter. CAPTCHAs are a hurdle for humans. Which is the intent...they are meant to be a hurdle...hopefully one a human can jump but not a computer. But regardless, hurdles are a bad user experience so if there's a way to do it without the hurdle, ...


39

Why would this be indecipherable to a computer? Since each word has the correct letters, but they are scrambled, it would seem very easy for me for a computer to crack the correct order of the letters by comparing it to known words. Which defeats the whole point of having this extra barrier. Secondly, how would this affect folks with dyslexia or other ...


1

One way to accomplish this would be to place a label, for instance the word 'tap' or 'continue' at the bottom. Users would see that and select it to continue. However, if in addition to that, you make the whole screen respond to a tap then, as users become more comfortable with the application they will know that they can, in fact, click anywhere.


2

Your tree structure and your colleague's hierarchical dropdown fields are essentially doing the same thing but personally I think the tree method is less abstrct and less fiddly. Taking your wireframes as a starting point, I would show the Organisations/Departments, Groups and Users search interfaces in 3 separate tabs (to avoid having lots of things ...


2

On the other hand, Blizzard, one of the companies best known for their intuitive UI, has done this for their iOS Hearthstone app: Simply saying "Tap anywhere to continue" isn't out of the question if you don't do it every other second.


2

Advantages of single text box As I see it, the main advantage of a single text box design is to give the user one thing to look at. With two boxes, the user has to constantly shift his/her eyes back and forth between their command text box and the main text box (between typing their entry and reading the response, or checking something they inputted ...


2

I got addicted to the addictinggames.com website for my flash game fix back in it's infancy and the complete list of games didn't have a scroll bar and watched them grow. I got the impression that in the game in question your going to be seeing the game over screen every 5 seconds until you learn the basic skills needed to survive. In that case my solution ...


3

In Material Design on Android it's common to make displays as virtual "cards" that overlay, say, the left 80% of the screen. The user swipes right to left to dismiss the card and return to the previous screen, which is partially visible behind the card. By visually layering the content, the user has a clear cue they can get back to the content below by ...


23

What's the issue with giving the user a predefined region of space with some sort of indicator that that space is where they should tap to continue - a button with an appropriate continue icon (the right-ward arrow is popular), for instance? From a UX perspective, you're removing a level of complexity by removing an unnecessary choice, namely where on the ...


4

I think this can be handled by looking at how you've prepared the user experience thus far. If the game has had several screens with small load-times up to this point, then the user will expect to have to do some waiting at these screens while the game loads/gets enough time to deliver a message, to continue. If you consistently have 'forced' the user to ...


3

If the elements are required for proper navigation then don't think about clutterness, You can provide any button to 'go back' or to 'continue' in minimalist design. I also suggest to provide the 'Re-play' option on 'Lost' screen to play again.


6

"On that screen, the user can tap anywhere to return to the gameplay screen." Without knowing what "gameplay screen" here are two suggestions. A common iOS strategy of presenting several view screens (gameplay and the one shown here?) is pushing and popping views via the navigation controller. That is if said view is a child of the 'gameplay view'. The ...


4

In the game "Two Dots", messages are shown in small dialog windows that have no buttons. To dismiss these, you have to tap on the background. Perhaps this solution could work for you.


52

There is no good way Here's the design logic: Backgrounds are perceived by users as backgrounds, i.e. inert and uninteractable. This is obvious. In order to communicate to users that the background is tappable, you need to tell them that. The most reliable way of doing this is to sign it, i.e. Tap to continue. Note that trying to do something fancy ...


1

We provide retail and stock control systems so accurate capture of barcodes and serial numbers at high speed is important to us. For what its worth, here's what we do, but our target market might be slightly different to yours. Use a barcode scanner. There are bluetooth ones that interface easily to most mobile devices. Of course this costs the end user ...


0

Well, if you can do this using barcode OR manual input, and you say serial numbers are sequential, so both teh barcode AND teh serial numbers will have common characters, you can do something like this: 1- Offer the user to scan the barcode (include some hint message) 1.1 - If user scans barcode 1.1.1 - on success --> stop 1.1.2 - on ...


4

Let's face it, serial numbers weren't meant to be consumed by humans. Can you imagine going to the grocery store and waiting for someone to manually enter each and every bar code number for all your items? In your situation I think option 3 is your best bet but I don't see why you couldn't combine option 3 with option 2. If the bar code scanner is failing ...



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