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Ok, I try to provide an answer in hope that it will encourage an expert to jump in, in case I tell nonsense. First of all I think the answer to your general question Should software attempt to interpret input such as 3,14 correctly? can only be unambiguously answered with a firm "it depends". I think the keyword in my above comment "every properly ...


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Agree with ElBel. it could be a 1 column form, with information grouped for clarity. you could group your info, spouse's info, address separately.


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Since this is in the UX forum I'm going to give you some UX feedback. :) Side-by-side forms, particularly for complex forms, are not good from a usability perspective. Best practices for form layout is a single column form, or possibly two very clear, distinct columns. Save yourself some work and forget about the form library or coding this up. It won't ...


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From a visual point of view, 2 sizes is OK, different sizes for input fields is very confusing, and the same applies if you expect to input 2 characters and have room for 40. The user will wonder if they need to add something else in most cases, so visual hinting plays a role. Of course, like Chris commented, you need to keep in mind that under a certain ...


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One of the major problems with online form design is that many of us try to simulate a printed form, assuming it is effective because it is familiar to the customer. As I'm sure you are aware, Luke Wroblewski has done some excellent research on online form design (Link to one of his articles is here: http://static.lukew.com/webforms_lukew.pdf) Even though ...


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A grid structure layout, using the amount of columns which will help you group your form elements accordingly. Mandatory fields should be marked and tab ↹ index should follow a sequence that users follow when they will fill this form


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... is this graphical representation really useful, or would three vertically arranged entry fields be better? three vertically arranged entry fields is better I researched this question by looking at some websites that handle a lot of packages and none of them tried to tie the Length, Width, and Height inputs to a visual model of a box. The ...


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Visual representation is always good, but here are several notes for your specific case. Operators enter same data each time, a lot of repetitive data. Operators will look at the screen rarely and often to validate the input only. Try to think about these two things and you will possible note that it's OK to put dimensions in a simple row with a ...


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This start/end dates problem is quite common in UX. With accounting, for instance, there is often the invoice date and (payment) due date - but there users are often interested in days (period) rather than due date. Anyhow, your solution is not bad at all. You could add lines to create a better visual grouping between the fields and the icon. The obvious ...


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There have been some nice developments to widgets since this question was asked. The old world Designers had to choose between placeholder only, label only, or label + placeholder. Each has disadvantages: Placeholder only is problematic because field meaning is obscured when it is filled in (see other answers). Label only is problematic because (1) the ...


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Form fields can have both labels and placeholder text. These are two different things. All form fields should have labels. Not all fields need placeholder text. You can also position a label over the field so it looks like placeholder text, but is still an actual label. You can also hide the label and only show placeholder text, but that would be awkward ...



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