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As your examples show, quick-reply boxes for either email and twitter can shorten the amount of content. So I could go the other way around. Have it in a separated window/page, show a preview of the typed text, include formatting options (markdown), and perhaps have a last step where the user press the Send button and is redirected to a Review page. If ...


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You should make it easy for the user to cheat. "I see you didn't run 2 km yesterday. Do you want to delete this task and completely forget about it?" Too often messages to the user sound like they are nagging or chastising them. An app should be written as a friendly helper, not a disciplinarian. If a user doesn't want to do a task, nagging will mean they ...


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Is this an edge case? Your ample illustration shows a simple user interface, or UI: 3 text boxes 1 button. It's not an undue burden for users to use the Backspace key to remove a few values. Most users probably won't want to clear the whole, which makes this scenario an edge case. It seems unnecessary to add clear-all complexity to a UI that's so ...


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I do not really think it matters if you capitalize your placeholder words or not. If you want to be consistent I would suggest going with: Search Restaurants, Cuisines, Dishes Also as far as proper wording check out Yelp, which is heavily search based, does not necessarily honor any consistency, as their search placeholders embodies all different ...


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First of all, it will all depend on your branded font. See how you mention "Roboto" and "Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" which are very similar. In that case, the answer to your question could be "no (relatively)". Now, use a branded font similar to Lobster and the answer will be a resounding "hell yeah!". You should really show a specimen of ...


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So YouTube is actually a great example of a site that does use custom fonts in their input fields. Exploring the site CSS, you can see that the search field uses Roboto, which is the custom font that Google developed. Since the method of delivering custom fonts has become so sophisticated (typically CDN), there really is no longer a reason to limit where you ...


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From a UX perspective, there is none, as long as the font is very legible. Remember, consistency is key when it comes to UX and Design.


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I agree with Xabre that you seem to be designing from the perspective of the database rather than the user. Nevertheless, the following might be an appropriate solution. Start from the display of the data, showing all possible attributes: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups When the user clicks add or edit, the data ...


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What's the exact purpose of doing it with free key/value types? It would be a mess to search in it... perhaps the best design here is no design and simply using a textbox with a basic markup e.g. everything before the ':' is in bold, everything after is not... Always think about the problem the users wants to solve, the goals he has in mind.


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It really depends on how many tags there are, whether or not people are able to create tags on the fly and any other limitations or requirements you have. Tags are very flexible things, and there have been many implementations of these. Even one quick Google images search returns vastly different options! So the second part of your question: yes, there ...


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Just use a standard text field. Entering a postcode is not as hard as it may seem. You can use regex for whitespace separation and auto numeric and character switching. i.e. force the mobile keypad to switch between numbers and characters when postcode is typed since you know what pattern it could be. Auto-suggestion would be the best option here. Canadian ...


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One way to do it could be to glean the Postal Code using the Address and CanadaPost API https://www.canadapost.ca/pca/support/webservices If you absolutely want your user to input manually, you could to use 6 separate fields, with the type alternating between text and number (this would toggle the appropriate keyboard). The fields could be styled to appear ...


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You could, perhaps, try implementing something similar to Google Maps, where the user just starts to type in their address, sees possible addresses to choose from, and can choose one of them that is the address they are looking for, and not have to type in the whole address. For the US addresses I've used on Google Maps, I've never had to actually type ...



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