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1

Since you've specified that you will only be using this form for a US audience, I don't really see a problem with guiding the user towards using a particular format. However, using multiple text fields might not be the best way to go about that. Let's study some existing websites as examples: Papa John's Pizza uses multiple fields for their account ...


2

My guiding principles for this are as follows, vis-à-vis users: Show them what you expect Take whatever they give you Show them what you’re taking The best way to accomplish all three with HTML5 and jQuery is to borrow this plugin. I’ve added type="tel" mainly to give mobile users a keypad instead of a keyboard, and placeholder="(999) 999-9999" as a ...


2

I would suggest you keep one input field, but use a mask for the text: -You can use Placeholder attribute from HTML5 (If you are working in a web App) for showing a example number.


1

Option 1. + input mask An input mask (this type, not a password field) allows the user to type in their number in one go (as if they were dialing for example), yet have the number formatted before it is submitted. This reduces the physical effort (navigating to the next input) and the mental effort (splitting up the number and context switching to the task ...


0

One form field, such as the one presented in option one, is a better experience. You could make the input flexible by allowing the user to enter their phone number in whatever format they wish and using logic to clean it up for the database. For example, a user could enter 123-456-7890, (123) 456-7890, 123.456.7890, etc and they would all be valid.


1

I'd opt for option 1 due to the ease of use from purely a responsive view point and like said earlier, if you plan to use the area code etc to some how collate your data and categorizes phone numbers. The last thing you would want is that number in separate inputs stacking on mobile or device although it wouldn't be a complete disaster again the con of ...


2

Force a more conscious choice on between system defaults and custom values. On form 2, I would have a checkbox that says "use defaults" or "use system calculated values", selected by default, and make the values grayed out and uneditable when this is selected. If this option is selected, a user will would expect the defaults to change to whatever is ...


2

Go with Example 1. One field for the phone number. Do some quick client side regex on the number the user entered, to account for any egregious errors to save an unecessary call to your server for 800 digit entries or garbled text. Ultimately, you are validating the web form data on the server and sanitizing it before dropping it into your database.


5

A single input field is always easiest for the user — whether it's for a phone number, first and last name, social security number, or any other value that you may think of as being divided into "parts". Luke Wroblewski has written many articles about this with plenty of data to back it up. Design your page for the user, not the database. If you ...


18

When a person dials an actual phone number with their phone, do they type 1-555-555-555 or do they type 5555555555? The only reason for forcing a fixed format is because your back-end can't determine the format it needs. Which is an implementation problem and you're forcing the lack of technical nous onto the end user. That's like saying "we aren't capable ...


0

i think this is the textbook case for they the <output element was implemented in html5. i've seen a few examples styled as knobs, which shows both display input and output: the knob has a marking in one position, showing the user where the input is at all times; as it turns on the dial, the output element is used to illuminate the selected volume at the ...


1

I think you are introducing extra complexity just for the sake of it. A user hates filling out forms and extra time figuring out which fields are optional, mandatory and recommended is just extra cognitive load. Split the form into two sections, mandatory at top, optional at bottom. You can indicate that some of the optional fields are recommended by ...


-1

This would be a really simple approach. In order to ensure maximum clarity, you should be displaying a line of text somewhere next to the form (preferably above it), explaining meaning of what different designations. For recommended fields, you could another, similar designation, perhaps (+). Then you'd have the following: ( * ) - required ( + ) - ...


0

If the user's role is selected by an administrator, perhaps it would be prudent to allow them to select what they feel they should be. At the same time, you could alert them that their selection may be updated by an administrator. Otherwise, it would seem that not showing that field would be prudent. a) users are not required to select one -their selection ...


1

You want an answer from the user but would select a default. That is absurd. Most users get through a form as quickly as possible. Often they will skip a field with a value just to get through the form or they may have been distracted and when they come back to the form they just assume any field with a value they completed. It proves the value came ...


0

I don't think it's a big 'no no' to have nothing displayed as a default value, however consistency is probably the key here. Either the same principle should be applied everywhere. However, I would say that I feel as though an empty value is an opportunity wasted to provide more information to the user, perhaps a description of some sort? I like your ...



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