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80

I've seen this occasionally in usability tests. When I ask it's usually because they have filled in many paper forms where there is a request to 'fill out in block capitals' or similar — so they think that is the default for all forms. With solicitors I imagine there may be similar issues where court forms have to be filled out in specific formats. Have ...


72

There are a great many assumptions people make about names (also: W3C: Personal names around the world.) Thankfully the W3C have some excellent advice on field design for names, of which the simplest is to use two fields (but not for first/last): Full name [________________] What should we call you? (for example, when we send you mail?) [________________] ...


71

Auto capitalization is impossible. What algoritm would you use to auto capitalize when a lady enters "cléopatra diane de mérode" as her name? You would probably end up with things like: Cléopatra Diane De Mérode Cléopatra diane De mérode The only correct spelling however is "Cléopatra Diane de Mérode" (wikipedia). As you can see, capitalization of ...


65

Option 3 with no intrusive validation. 1 sucks because it's out of the norm. Copy and paste may or may not work. Tabbing to the next field may or may not work. People are good at correcting mistakes and the limited fields mess up their muscle memory. For example I might type 1912 When I meant 192 My fingers will nearly instantaneously correct ...


63

Why would this be indecipherable to a computer? Since each word has the correct letters, but they are scrambled, it would seem very easy for me for a computer to crack the correct order of the letters by comparing it to known words. Which defeats the whole point of having this extra barrier. Secondly, how would this affect folks with dyslexia or other ...


62

Ironically, I could not get by myself what bgeigr meant, but almighty Google helped me out: So this captcha is quite easy for computers to guess, yet may be hard for humans. And bear in mind that Google is using an error model for common typos (letters replaced by those adjacent on the keyboard etc.) If you program your computer to only consider ...


61

Why don't simply improve the standard numerical keyboard by adding the missing characters ? download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


58

Users enter information in upper case either intentionally, or unintentionally (e.g. they happen to have CAPSLOCK activated). Several other answers mention a variety of reasons for why the user may be doing so intentionally. If it is unintentional, then the user probably wants to know about it, and correct it. As others have mentioned, designing an ...


52

There is no good way Here's the design logic: Backgrounds are perceived by users as backgrounds, i.e. inert and uninteractable. This is obvious. In order to communicate to users that the background is tappable, you need to tell them that. The most reliable way of doing this is to sign it, i.e. Tap to continue. Note that trying to do something fancy ...


44

The article Robert Fraser cites is a good one, but it's a decade old. The web has changed somewhat since then. Do you honestly agree with the sentences highlighted in the image below? We must be careful to distinguish between a browser-based experience that is "documenty" (where the BACK button works just fine) and "applicationy" (where the user may need ...


35

tl;dr A good captcha would need (ideally) to offer the best possible protection (difficult to get for a computer) and ease of use (easy to get for a human). But captchas aren't good at this and "typoCaptchas" doesn't seem to improve them. Questions can be rearrenged quite easily and then if the question is easy enough for people is probably easy enough for ...


34

No. If you mean something that cancels the current form and takes you back to where you were, the browser's back button is already there. If you mean a "reset"/"clear all" button that clears everything you typed in, then NO, NO, NO! It's way too easy to accidentally click, and adds no value. Either way, here's a must-read article on the subject: ...


34

In general users are pretty accurate and fast at entering dates as strings in a text box as long as your validation isn’t unnecessarily fussy and provides decent auto-correction and defaults for the sub-fields (e.g., accepting 2-9-04 as well as 02/09/2004). Calendar controls are great to provide as an option when the user isn’t certain of the date (e.g., for ...


34

Because this behavior is rare and therefore unexpected, it will surprise most novice users, which can cause them to misunderstand how to use the interface, and interfere with usability. (An example of this interference might be if the user fills out the field and presses tab, while you have auto-advanced, and while they think they are typing in the next ...


33

What is the context of the question the user is answering, and what are the implications? This is the important question that helps guide the appropriateness of "Y" vs. "YES" (or "N" vs. "NO"). In this case you are dealing with a RSA certificate, which is a big deal. Accepting a certificate you don't mean to can have serious implications, so it is important ...


33

I've taken the time to draw some wireframed examples that might help you decide on how to design your time-picker control. Below you can see 3 screenshots which show (IMAGE 1) a time-picker control for all units, an increment button, decrement button, numeric input field and unit picker dropdown (if needed.) IMAGE 2: The idea is that you set it up so that ...


32

This is not effective for keeping out a targeted attack by someone who uses a word list, such as /usr/share/dict/words, to solve your anagrams. A task like "unscramble the words in standard input, assuming the first and last letters are correct, given a word list file for the language" is probably so straightforward that it'd make a good puzzle for our Code ...


31

The major problem with inline placeholder text is after filling out a number of fields, it is difficult or sometimes impossible to determine what the original purpose of that field was. Say for example you are filling out a form and decide to change your input, so you clear it out and then somehow you get sidetracked by a phone call of something else. Is ...


30

I would suggest no. Treat a person's name - in terms of capitalization, spelling, punctuation and spacing - exactly as the person does. [1] There are a variety of cultures with names that does not use capitalization in all parts of their names. It's true that most traditional English, American, north/central European names are written with ...


30

Will Company Name be stored in the database with spaces and then a separate URL column will have no spaces? I would recommend building the URL just below the Company Name as they type so when the user types "Super Duper Acme Co." your app will show: Your dedicated URL will be: www.superduperacmeco.com This will cause the user to pay attention and ...


30

When a person dials an actual phone number with their phone, do they type 1-555-555-555 or do they type 15555555555? The only reason for forcing a fixed format is because your back-end can't determine the format it needs. Which is an implementation problem and you're forcing the lack of technical nous onto the end user. That's like saying "we aren't capable ...


29

You say the keyboard is for hexadecimal input. And that's the reason why your second try doesn't feel right! As @steveverrill also noticed in the comments, the numeric order ABCDEF1234567890 is wrong. So if you want to go with a 4x4 layout, you should choose one of these: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


27

One alternative that I've seen in a number of places is to have two adjacent lists, one with available items and one with selected items. Here's an example from OpenFaces.org that I found with a quick google search:


27

Indicating the caps lock is on is a design pattern used for passwords. When the passwords are hidden and every character is only represented by a dot, users might not know they're typing capitals where they shouldn't. It's easy to overlook the fact your caps lock is on. For example, I'm used to typing with ten fingers. While typing my elbows are set quite ...


26

Here's a scenario where it might work to your advantage: The user enters their full name in one field. The system reverse concatenates the name as best it can. The field shows the split apart name so the user can verify it. If it's correct, no further action needed. If it's wrong, a little edit button lets them go to the complex form (two fields) and ...


25

Answer: No. Checkboxes vs. Radio Buttons - Nielsen Norman 2004 Radio buttons are used when there is a list of two or more options that are mutually exclusive and the user must select exactly one choice. In other words, clicking a non-selected radio button will deselect whatever other button was previously selected in the list. Checkboxes are used ...


24

In theory the correct answer is no upper limit for name lengths. Allow the user to enter whatever their name is using whatever characters are available to them so that you will never run into a circumstance where someone is prevented from entering their valid real name. In practice that is not possible to implement. There have to be limitations. These ...


23

This is a tricky interaction, mostly because it has to be super intuitive since the end users are not computer savy. I know it because I´ve had to deal with it in the past :) I had the same problem while working in the UX team at 11870.com (a recomendations website similar to Yelp), this is the way we handled it, might not be the ideal solution but it ...


23

What's the issue with giving the user a predefined region of space with some sort of indicator that that space is where they should tap to continue - a button with an appropriate continue icon (the right-ward arrow is popular), for instance? From a UX perspective, you're removing a level of complexity by removing an unnecessary choice, namely where on the ...


22

Another solution is the facebook like "multi select bar". (I don't know what the exact name for it is.) You can find an example here. Basically it is like a text input field but the selected items turn into "tags". Just try it out on the page I have linked to.



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