New answers tagged

0

Why do you think interacting with select boxes is annoying? Remember not all mouse clicks are to be considered bad. Select boxes have been around for a very, very long time, and are a neat concise way to select a value. You can also set a default value (if it makes sense), which could be beneficial to the user because they may not even need to interact with ...


0

The option with two select list is much better than adding 10 more options. Users do like to read. They just scan, a big part of time. Considering the fact that you are gonna to use only two select list with pretty small number of items inside, it is not such a big deal for user. Seeing a ton of similar information is pretty annoying and hard to distinguish....


-3

The input fields should be cleared out. It is an input field not a page title. For good UI the functional parts should serve a singular purpose. Not clearing the input is simply lazy and annoying done more out of a tradition of laziness than actual logic. Think of a better way to handle the case of re-initiating the search. Perhaps a clickable search ...


2

Since the situation of the panels is likely to be geo sensitive I would suggest using the Google maps API. The user would be able to select the geographic location of the panel by the normal Google Maps search (long/lat, zip, etc.). Once the user has determined the geographic location they would be 'offered' the optimum orientation and inclination for ...


2

I would suggest using images displaying what orientation and inclination means, and the ability to modify the values using sliders. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

Search box are essentiall just input fields that serve a special purpose. Input fields usually keep their input, unless the user deletes it himself. Making an input simply disappear without an explicit "delete" option would be bad, since it takes control from the user and it contradicts with standard input field behaviour. But you don't even need a delete ...


4

You can also provide a separate clear search or reset sort of a feature in your search bar's input box. By which you are not taking the control from the users and also you give them an option to perform the task.


57

If you clear the box, you're taking away control from the user. While you may seem like you're doing them a favor, you're robbing them of context for what they just typed in. When you type things into a command prompt, the previous command you typed is still there. Although you state that it's a long ID that the user probably just pasted in have you ...


87

I have a personal hatred towards websites which clear content from the Search bar after I hit Search. Here's why: It is completely unnecessary to clear the content out. There are multiple chances that the user might want to add something to that query. For example, if I search for American Psycho and I find that it's a movie with amazing ratings and I ...


0

Both are valid and address different application scenarios. What happens in case you've just mistakenly picked a wrong tag/item? How do you delete it?: In #1: 1. You type in and pick a wrong item 2. You grab the mouse and point to the wrong item 3. Click on the [X] to delete the tag (input blurs) 4. Click on the input to focus it and enter another item In #...


4

This is the designed I used for showing allowed characters :


0

Use the first form. In my opinion, users are accustomed to the first type of this insert tag operation. Therefore, you are in align with the consistency usability heuristic. If the second form is more complicated for implementation, then it would probably be more susceptible to bugs. So make your life easier and stick with option 1. Imagine how the second ...


2

Use inline validation when the user enters the url: You don't need to clutter the interface with massages. Only show this message when they've encountered the error. Also, you can show the characters that are not allowed instead of those that are allowed because it is evident for most of them. Characters like / ! @ , | are not allowed due to security ...


0

If you have a feature to input the user's URL, you need to make sure it accepts any reasonable input. Disallowing valid, common URLs for security reasons is not going to be a good approach (from the question it appears that a URL with a ? is not allowed, which isn't acceptable in my view). Because this isn't something a user can just change. You will ...


1

I don't think it's necessary to split these two. For each job (including all three types of job mentioned in your question), I would have your Set 2, but I would add a note along the lines of "If you don't remember the exact date, you can either guess as best as you can, or leave the field blank." That way, it's the same experience to the user in either ...


0

Usually, input fields on mobile get cleared if you hold the backspace/delete key foe a few seconds, and for me that's actually intuitive, as I try to do it always when I try to delete everything I've entered. It doesn't work everywhere, but I think it could be a good alternative in your case.


1

You and Google material design have already described a good solution to your problem. The method applies well to both text areas and text input fields, so don't hesitate to use this approach. See the image below:


0

The best alternative on mobiles to clean fields is to display "x" button at the right side of the field. Taking into account the long or right-aligned text there are three options: Option 1. Disregard the formatting and let user edit the text left aligned. It's more convenient anyway. I prefer this option. Option 2. Expand the edit box to nearby cell and ...


4

My bank has a strict 5-digit pincode policy and the input looks like as many underscores as there are characters allowed. It's very minimalist, yet you quickly get that each corresponds to a character. Here's an approximate rendering of it: A B C _ _ _ _ _


0

what about any swipe gesture? I have seeing even shacking your phone to clear data.


1

In my opinion, you could use "helper text" inside your input, which describes number of characters. In my example i use "abc" text as help. One letter typed by the user replaces one letter of the helper text.


1

I work on an SaaS platform with similar forms to the one you described and i don't necessarily agree that users automatically interpret disabled fields as, "This value makes no sense in this configuration", especially if there's a value in the field. In my experience, disabled fields that contain a value indicate that they're not editable, but the ...


2

It is possible to distinguish between uneditable text and locked fields by placing a small lock-sign symbol against the form-field. You can enable a hover and describe why you are locking that field or simply state that "this field is locked" Check my https://moqups.com/tapa8728@colorado.edu/yjB41GXd for a mockup. Based on your design, you can choose to ...


2

You should probably add a hover state and not have the background be a light grey when off, as that commonly denotes a disabled input. Also, a checkbox is commonly bordered. Not a must, but it's commonplace.



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