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The scrollable “flipper” for one important reason. When in that format, it shows relationship to other data points (the years before and after) and this helps to focus the user’s mind in a time-based thought process, which is the desired cognitive state for recalling and asserting this type of information. Users lose focus or forget what they’re doing; ...


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In the process of developing a new app (releasing next week), we ran into this exact problem. We originally included a date picker, but went back to the drawing board because we realized we didn't ask the right question. For us, it was straight text inputs, no pickers or options. So, apologies, but you're not asking the right question either. What is the ...


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I prefer the scroll-able in iOS. A key UX principle is to be consistent with industry standards. Jakob Nielsen had this on his famous 10 usability heuristics for UI design (see "follow platform conventions" Furthermore Most of the time for current dates and birth dates the user wont do much scrolling. You can also put multiple wheels if your date ranges are ...


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Scrolling from 2015 to some older years can be a pain, I suggest a two digit (not four) entry field. It is the fastest way, and the first two digits in a birth year are unneeded.


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Twitter FTW I've always thought Twitter has the best solution to this. It allows you to hammer out whatever you like, then edit it down to something that fits. It's extremely clear to the user.


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Don't let user type anything longer than 55 characters, and give feedback on how much characters are left when each character entered . download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Edit: Of course a tooltip informing that user reached the limit would be a nice to have.


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It looks abit crowded because you are showing all the information on the same screen at the same time. the screen shot isn't clear but it looks like you could replace the sequence of the same fields with an add button. Try to think in terms of when the user will need to use which block of information, and show clear navigation on how the user can pull out ...


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I would suggest looking into a few of these design guides. Googles Material Design: http://www.google.com/design/spec/material-design/introduction.html Bootstrap: http://getbootstrap.com/ Either one is going to give you 'clean' web ready out of the box.


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If you want to use dropdown in that way, you must teach your users that "this" thing work different on your site. Actually most people know only how standard ComboBox works, so in this case you may need usability tests. What I mean? I don't know the context of use, but the rest of elements on your site must work similarly, creating something like "Design ...


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download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If you want usability stick to the classic combobox.The phone and tablet browsers understand what is a combo and they will display it full screen when opened. It will be easier for your users on small screen to select options.If you absolutely need horizontal selection, go to to a ...


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This is partially anecdotal, but having filled out tons of forms, many that have shipping AND billing addresses, and having had both situations where they are the same and different, you want to make it as easy as possible. My suggestion would be after filling out the billing address offer two buttons: Use Billing Address for Shipping and Enter Shipping ...


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Hide it for all digital subscriptions. Show just the button, ticked by default, for physical products, with the form fields showing up if the user un-ticks the button. If a user has a different billing address and shipping address they are usually looking for 2 sets of forms to fill out. If there is only one, they will find out why. But for most people ...


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Ticked and delivery address folded or greyed/disabled. Because: "Most of the subscriptions are for digital products. However, a few of them may have a print included in the package and we would need a delivery in this case" Most users don't need it - don't show it. Show it only on demand or make it obvious as optional. It makes your form more convenient, ...


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Considering usability and UX, you design for probability and not possibility. However you have to take care of the possibilities too. This is a interesting case, Although I see it as an excellent case for user study, A-B testing etc. but I will make a guess. If most of the content you offer is intended to be consumed by self, chances are the users will ...


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Is it possible for the user to edit these details? If they're not locked down then it might be worth encouraging the user to populate these empty items by adding some sort of edit state trigger titled something like 'Add details'. It would seem a shame to waste the opportunity of displayed empty fields to remind users to populate them.


4

Don't leave fields blank When a field is blank, the user has no indication that the blank space is intentional (and not a page/widget error). It's for the same reason that publishers print intentionally blank notices in books to avoid user confusion: The presentation in your screenshot (using the - indicator) works fine from a usability perspective. ...


3

I see that those file types can be classified as text or image files, so it'd be recommended to offer the option to select all the files of one type just with a click. Also it provides better organization (even better if you order them by most used or alphabetically). If the user wants to select by file type, the max amount of clicks needed is 1 so it ...


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Really depends under which context you are using it in. If you're using content like icons, thumbnails, numbers or short words in the drop-down(drop-right) it might actually look better than on using a drop-down. Optionally you could also go for a drop-down grid to get a more balanced result.


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Its might looks new, but it's depend on the number of content you have on the list. if it's like 'choosing a name of a country'; think about the width of your screen (pretty wired right ..!). but for a small number (<6) , its might be better . but remember, if you going to use it then be consistent throughout the application, because your user might ...


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This pattern has been used in gaming such as selecting the hardness of the game or for simple controls. ( easy - medium- hard) If there is Left - Center - Right arrangement, i think that it will increase some factors, especially reduced error and speed. If your project needs to be used in smaller screens, having horizontal arrangement will not be the ...


1

While it depends on the form and the data, in your particular case I wouldn't do it. If you pre-fill fields, most users will leave them "as is" because they won't know if they can modify those fields, or they won't care. Either way, a bad behavior because neither you nor the user will get the expected results. Pre-filled forms should only be used when the ...


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Those are still required fields. Based on your edit, your watermarking is using actual data, so you need to signify what fields are required. The From field you obviously need them to fill in, so you can't accept the default. The Report Name, Subject, and Date Range fields, however, that's your call. They are valid defaults that the user may want to ...


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From a visual point of view, 2 sizes is OK, different sizes for input fields is very confusing, and the same applies if you expect to input 2 characters and have room for 40. The user will wonder if they need to add something else in most cases, so visual hinting plays a role. Of course, like Chris commented, you need to keep in mind that under a certain ...


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This isn't the answer you are looking for, but if you don't have time to test, don't try something out of the ordinary. I personally think that solution looks great, it's clean and clear, and the progression makes a lot of sense. However, I don't know your user base, and it could throw someone off. I also foresee some random Android phone that handles ...


2

At least one example is in spreadsheets. Both Excel and Google Docs have Enter move to the next row and Tab move to the next column. If your the end user is familiar with certain types of data entry, using Enter may be more familiar to them. For example see: This is a fake example, but many financial documents are set up to be entered a single column at a ...


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There are two common patterns for clearing: explicit clearing, through a button, such as the included button you provided in your captures, or through a stand-alone button for the whole form. This latter solution tends to be a bad practice as users may press it instead of the submit button, and there are few use cases which require a clear form button. ...


3

Clear buttons are normally provided when the field is being used affect a default view and the user is likely to want to return to that default. For example, to filter the list of all products in a catalogue and then to return to the unfiltered list. It's easier and more intuitive to click an explicit 'clear' button than it is to highlight the contents, ...


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The best wuold be if open by the button wouldn't disabled the input, but if it's not possible... I'm defenitely for the popup. When I use the calendar widget, sometimes I select the day on the popup and then change the year by keyboard. This is much important when you are asking about birthdate, then travelling date for example: in the first case, blocking ...


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I would suggest the 'Button' option however both have their own benefits and weaknesses. Reason against the 'Popup': Firstly, if you tab into a field rather than click it and a drop down calendar appears without your requesting it that can be distracting. Some users would prefer to type only and would rather not be confronted with a secondary input ...


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That example you have gone with isn't ideal really. I would look at this from the perspective of how the user is interacting with the field. Take a keyboard user for instance. If they tab into a field then it is likely they will be expecting to manually type into that field. If the calender popup also appears, provided it isn't obstructing the form itself ...


2

I think you have almost answered your own question. The button approach does a better job of conveying how the widget works, because it conforms to expected idiomatic behavior for the text input and the calendar button. The popup approach has a clearer entry point (only 1 control) and requires only 1 click (vs potential 2) for the user to see both input ...


0

May be you could just start filling the final client text box with the same text as the user is typing in the direct client with a grayish color and then user could also type in the final client!


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download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Here is another approach that is common enough for you to consider implementing as well. Start with a empty table that has an input box to edit the column heading (perhaps with some text to indicate that you can enter and edit the content. Once you have entered in a value and ...



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