New answers tagged

0

Here are some options to reduce cognitive load and make the task easier: Shorten your descriptions. 200 symbols * 19 options = 3800 symbols, which is roughly A4 sheet, full of text. Looks crazy. Substitute long description with short labels. For repetitive users this is OK, for the new ones provide some help/guide. E.g. "Home", "Professional", ...


2

Considering your design layout, I really think the best option is to use either checkboxes or radio buttons (depending on whether the user can select more than one option or not). Below is a quick mockup of what I mean: However, if you have a large number of options, this could prove to be problematic. In that case, I would consider having your Section C ...


1

In most (if not all) modern browsers and Operating Systems the menu of a dropdown is a separate (but not independent) object from the trigger. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This means that the text on the trigger can be safely truncated while the contents of the menu remain full length - Effectively showing the ...


0

I would prefer to hide them and show them on hover. this will bring to the user the idea that he must select (click) on a field to put a text. the user will play first with the pointer up and down and he will notice very easily that the input box will remain shown whenever he/she will click. I am not with the idea to hide it completely unless you click ... ...


0

If we are talking about a web page, on mobile devices with smaller screens, I can imagine the 'hide' approach being problematic. My own habit when browsing on mobile is to zoom in and 'fit' the width of the text I'm reading to the screen width (by double-tapping on the text). This way I have maximum text size without losing much information about where I am ...


11

Why have a separate text box for each field if the user can only input a value once? Just have a single text box to hold the value of whatever option they select: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The label of the box can change based on which option they select. You can either hide this field until they've ...


4

In the company where I work, the UX team always wants "every input visible to the user" firstly because you are communicating the user the whole process, and secondly because an appearing field is more hard to recognize, leading to many errors in filling the inputs before submitting the form. This is quite always true, but of course there are some edge ...


21

When you grey out a control, you are communicating "something is currently disabled, but may become available if you do something else on the page". The only down-side of this approach is the disabled controls will occupy space on the page, so if those disabled controls are rarely used and/or there are many of them, it could be adding unnecessary visual ...


6

I can see both sides of those designs and I don't think that either is "wrong" but I would always recommend keeping things simple for the user. In this instance, that would mean having the boxes visible but greyed out. This accomplishes two things: The user is aware from the beginning that they will need to prove additional text. Were the box hidden, ...


2

If you hide them first, and show them once a radio button has been chosen, you have to indicate that this is going to happen. If you don't, users might not expect this to happen, and can get confused or even annoyed by the fact they have to do "yet another" action to complete this part of the form. If you cannot clearly state somehow what the next step for ...


1

Speaking as a former teacher filling in marks is something typically done after all of the papers/assignments have been graded. Thus one has ~30 scores to input, and the stack of assignments is in the order the pile is in (order ~= submission order) As such, the closer to a grid like (think Excel) format the better. In fact for speed I'd often re-order ...


1

One problem I thought exists with this approach has to do with the order in which the teacher needs to enter the scores. If she has a stack of graded tests, she'd need to sort them before using this procedure. It might be nice to be able to type part of the student's name and have matches immediately displayed.


2

Using blue would be a good choice. The reason the IRS uses dark blue is likely (though of course this is speculation) because it's what most pens write with. So it's a form of skeuomorphism, if you will. You can follow suit, or you can try coming up with your own color, if you want to stick to your companies' branding colors or something. Things to keep in ...


0

I would go with option B. More consistent. If you want to ensure that admins to not change the text/background color to poor looking option maybe you can consider giving the "color presets" / skins instead of free form color change.


1

MATLAB uses commas to delimit columns and semicolons to delimit rows. Thus, a matrix can be displayed and edited in a single string using a combination of these delimiters. String Format: [1,2,3; 4,5,6; 7,8,9] Matrix Format: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


3

Why did you say its a poor interface? Have you tested this with your users? One minor suggestion though, I would prefer to place the add button below the fields. The add button in your design gives the impression that the action is exclusive to the last field. The username fields should be viewed as a group, therefore adding a new field should affect the ...


0

I am not saying this implementation of adding multiple websites on a form is the best design, but I think it might be cleaner than your solution. You can add as many sites as you want before you save, and the ones with a valid website will be saved when you click "Save." As is implied by the hamburger menu, you can also reorder them. Clicking "x" on all ...


0

The closest I know to what you're looking for is Material Design UI Kit and Android Lollipop UI Kit Sketch Resource, both of them made by Ivan Bjelajac, but I doubt you'll find something with all possible states, so if you're in the mood for doing it, I'd say go on and do it!


1

You could just give the user a formatting syntax for defining the matrix, so it can be entered as plain text. It would probably help if you use a multi-line re-sizable text field, then you can have one vector per line, and just have space separated values. You can even format the values with extra spaces between them so that the user can clearly see ...


0

If I'm reading your question correctly, you're looking for the best descriptive text for this situation since you're locked into a certain form layout. I suggest: Number of days before event to send notification: [input]


0

It sounds like the question is "how do I display the number of days that the user will be notified of a certain thing?" If that's right, one line is enough but it's confusing. Each notification will have its own date since you won't send more than one per day, and you might even make it a datetime. The reason to separate each one is to distinctly show that ...


3

The show/hide toggle and the multiple sets of inputs for recording the same type of data seem inefficient. You can save on UI by only having one set of inputs and letting the user specify if the goal is for home or away. User simply starts recording goals, and as they are saved they populate the area below the input UI. 1) If 0-0 - Don't hide the UI ...


0

If the match result is 0:0 should I use on/off slider button to disable the area or should I remove it and let the user to leave this area empty? In my opinion it is good to keep the slider button. The interface will be more clear. But I would think about the header. Maybe "Did anyone score?" would be better then "Who scored?" Or if user has to ...


1

Use Auto-complete instead - best of both worlds! That way, you don't have two UI elements, only one - and you can still standardise people's data entry.


-2

The best answer would be 'Ask Yourself'. When you drive car, Do you want to read Road Signals in written text? Probably Not. Because it will take time and you should be focused on the road. So, Red, Yellow and Green colors are simple enough to convey the meaning of signals. Arrow signs are quite simple than 'TURN RIGHT' or 'DO NOT TRY TO OVERTAKE' (by ...


5

When the icons exactly (or as near possible) confer the ideas and concepts of a form's box, they are greatly beneficial to rapidity of viewer comprehension. Good/Great icons provide another more subjective quality, that of endearment and apparent consideration (demonstrated empathy) of and to the time/rate of the user's digestion and ease of familiarity ...


1

Well, tag is used to group related elements in a form - so yes. You can also take usage of legend and label inside your fieldset, i.e.: <fieldset> <legend>Date</legend> <label><select><option value=".....</select> Day</label> <label><select><option value=".....</select> ...


0

Yes fieldset is better option as it allows you to group set of fields and also allows you to mark up your data.


0

Yes <fieldset> should be used for grouping inputs for text, radio-dials, checkboxes and other related content that should be grouped together so this would include both input and select elements.


2

You're going to need to explicitly tell users they can do this, and provide a visual demonstration of the functionality, because this is extremely uncommon. There is almost nothing like this in this era of completely singular copy/paste thinking. See Ted Nelson's complaints about this ridiculous reduction in the power of computing. He was, so far as I ...



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