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There may not be a universal rule that can be applied, since the reaction of a user to the text input size will relate to the task they wish to accomplish, and their expectations of the application / site. Usability testing with your target users is probably the only way to accurately guage their particular expectations.


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Very good question, I had the same request from one of my clients and what I actually did was that I created a toggle button beneath the select option to create a new category (text) or revert back in-case they change their mind :) During the toggle, I had to make some changes to the name attribute e.t.c. My client loves it...


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50 characters (of which 15-25, depending on layout, are visible in the form input field) for the family name should be plenty. It's what works well for me, anyway. For consistency, one should assign the same amount for the first name(s). I decided for the number 50 a decade or so ago because the longest realistic name I could come up with ad hoc was 15 ...


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In theory the correct answer is no upper limit for name lengths. Allow the user to enter whatever their name is using whatever characters are available to them so that you will never run into a circumstance where someone is prevented from entering their valid real name. In practice that is not possible to implement. There have to be limitations. These ...


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Given the diversity of names, I wouldn't... set a floor or ceiling limit on name length, OR even break the name into two separate fields. Depending on the country / cultural background of a person, they may have a more Westernized [first-name] [surname] name, but they may not. Why possibly bar users from entering their complete name because of arbitrary ...


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Based on the type of the application you may want to select an upper or lower limit for the names. The upper limit though a tricky approach the lower limit may be 1 char since the person may choose to write an initial instead of the complete name. If your system requires a name then obviously you wouldn't want the user to exit without entering a name at all. ...


4

I think this could end up being a matter of opinion. I do not select everything. I think that selecting everything gives more chances to delete things that the user may not want to delete and sometimes Ctrl+Z may not work or may not work as expected, so things may be lost forever. If the user wants to delete or replace everything, even when it may take a ...


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Method B is far most efficient You should always display the "edit" function the nearer as possible of the concerned field. Especially in your case where you have only one field editable The delete function can be placed at the end of the row because it act on the complete row. Both of these must be displayed when you roll-over the row not only the ...


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I think fundamentally yes. Firefox have started doing this as part of their basic functionality (citation needed), however, as site owner you can be cleverer, remembering things like marked map points, or bespoke, site specific field selections. The problem is that when a a form is served it can only be populated with data that the server knows about, ...


4

Personally, I like to structure my form so that my fields are vertical. This leaves a clean area to the right to put validation messages, help icons, etc. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups That said, you can have either way. No way is better than the other. As long as you have the Six Components of Web Forms, ...


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There's a Gestalt law of grouping saying that elements close to each other are perceived as belonging together: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principles_of_grouping#Proximity . I would even go as far and reckon that it was this perception that made you ask this question in the first place... ;-) Thus in your example, "First Name" and "Username", and "Last ...



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