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0

Here's one alternative option (obviously the actual madlibs form design will be different in your case, but hopefully you can see how you might allow the user to optionally add or remove a "sentence" of form controls): download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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I did some research while I was waiting for answers... http://uxfindings.blogspot.com/2014/06/is-numeric-spinner-best-name-for-this.html


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Ceefin's answer makes a very good point. By focusing too much on the details you can overlook what actually matters about UX, which is what the user experiences. And there's no more frustrating experience than a form that asks a simple question, then doesn't let you answer it. This kind of over-validation is horribly common with postal addresses-- I've ...


2

A clearly defined label stating what input is required by the user should prevent the problem of max length of the input field. There may well be people over the age of 99 using the internet now, so perhaps max length should be 3


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I feel that the best solution would be to use a watermark (gray text in an input when it's empty) with the text 0-99. This clearly states that: Input has to be a number The range is from 0 to 99 There are even ready-made solutions for this, like jquery-watermark.


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Make sure that the user can use any kind of input; mouse or keyboard (or touch for that matter). And through visual hints like: The width of the input field A representative-icon on the left side of the input field A placeholdertext/icon Possible (i)-icon on the right with hover-info Visually wrapping input boxes in a container You should be able to help ...


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The most succinct - and generally most commonly used - way to distinguish a required field in forms is to use an asterisk next to the label (*). This way a user can easily distinguish which fields are required and which are not. So for example this pattern could look like: Label * [ input with placeholder/code hint text] If you think this could ...


1

I have a couple of ideas. One possibility is to embolden the placeholder text of the required ones. That may not be very intuitive but it should at least indicate that there is a difference and they may be able to then infer from the fields that those are required and the other aren't. Likewise, you could italicize optional fields. Another is to add ...


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If inputs has border then You can play with border color for example required a bordered black and additional in gray color. Or use * sign for placeholder text and label


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Perhaps placing 'View My Meetings' and 'Search New Meetings' (or some other variation to include the suggestions by @Pierre) in two distinct columns rather than a single column would help to differentiate them as well. A single column may suggest the two options work in tandem. Could the two titles appear as tabs above the meeting list?


2

I feel inclined to ask why you must make this distinction at all. If they want to see just their meetings with the Theme "Chocolate," why not allow that? I think forcing them to do one or the other will only serve to confuse them. If you can, I would remove the separation between the two and make it so you can do them all at once. They're all filtering ...


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Edit Answer deleted. See discussion in comments download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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The "My meetings" caption at the top could be misleading because it can be seen as a title, falsely meaning that this sections allows to search in your meetings only. A suggestion could be to remove the checkbox and have : one button saying "show all my meetings" another one, next to the dropdown, saying "search new meetings by theme".


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On mobile screens the size of your canvas is limited. For aesthetic and practical value most input fields span the entire width of the screen save for some margin left and right of the input field. This leaves no room for the checkmark icon being on the outside of the input field. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...


2

Luke Wroblewski and Etre did some research into inline form validation and tested a range of different approaches with 22 average users. With regard to positioning the validation inside the field versus outside, they didn't find any substantial benefit to the former and noted that validation cannot be positioned inside all fields anyway so it would be ...


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UX Movement recently put out a good article discussing a closely related topic. They concluded that requiring fields actually causes users to fill out less information. With that in mind, I would suggest that requiring data only makes sense when you absolutely must have it in order to proceed. Pretending to require data is probably even worse, as you seem to ...


2

First, what is the use of "data collection" if the data is not used otherwise than harass the users? Not cool. Anyway, explain why you ask for such data as my email - if you don't have a real answer, don't ask. "Best practice" depends actually on the very use of the data. For example Hubspot requires a fairly complex data form for its free download of ...


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It sure isn't best practice and impedes users' trust for at least two reasons : what about a site that asks for personal information without saying what they are going to do with it ? What is the value for me ? Can I trust they will use it in my interest only ? what about a site that I can trick that easily ? Has the all thing been that poorly thought and ...


2

As others have said the differences are small, but there are a few details to make sure you get right: If any content is covered (options 2 and 3), there needs to be a clear, simple way to get rid of the covering, for if someone hit the search icon by mistake or changed their mind for any reason. This might be a point in favour of options 1 or 2: with 2, ...


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The interaction and location of the search icon depends completely on the context it is being used. Is it used to search for an item, in case of e-commerce site or is it used to search something within a site(professional/company site? The intent will give you an answer. If search is really critical to my task flow for an objective, then probably I will ...


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Every example you gave would work. One might work better within your design than the other. Your users won't really care about the way the search input pops up. The best search fields are bug free are easy in use give relevant results help users find what they are looking for (auto fill or alternatives) So I would focus more on functionality and less on ...


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It sounds like you're starting with an assumption. Before going any further and risking over-engineering, I would take a moment to challenge that assumption. I would take a step back and understand your business requirements. Is there a security concern with letting your user change his name, letting him impersonate different people constantly? Is the ...


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Bottom is definitely the most common way that I've seen it displayed, and left/right is probably just dependent on the placement of your submit/save etc buttons. You simply want to let people know when they are about to go over, or have already gone over. If they have gone over, you want to let them know how much they need to cut it down. In this respect I ...


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The common practice seems to be to add it below. See e.g. the comment boxes on any Stackexchange site or Twitter. The important part IMHO is that the number is visible to the user when the information is relevant. E.g. if your input field is big and goes below the fold, but you want to give the user feedback to add at least 15 characters (like ...


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Have you considered using a drag-and-drop type of interface that allows the user to add and set the questions and then drag lines between them to indicate relationships and dependencies? It could make for a much simpler use experience than trying to create algorithms or expressions.



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