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My suggestion is to split that large form into smaller sections like blocks of fields (related ones in one group with maximum of 10 fields). Step1: - Step2: Email: [ ] Confirm Email: [ ] Date of birth: [ ] ... And so on. Hide(minimize) them all except the first one. Create a NEXT button at the bottom-right of each one to open the ...


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I do not really think it matters if you capitalize your placeholder words or not. If you want to be consistent I would suggest going with: Search Restaurants, Cuisines, Dishes Also as far as proper wording check out Yelp, which is heavily search based, does not necessarily honor any consistency, as their search placeholders embodies all different ...


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First of all, it will all depend on your branded font. See how you mention "Roboto" and "Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" which are very similar. In that case, the answer to your question could be "no (relatively)". Now, use a branded font similar to Lobster and the answer will be a resounding "hell yeah!". You should really show a specimen of ...


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So YouTube is actually a great example of a site that does use custom fonts in their input fields. Exploring the site CSS, you can see that the search field uses Roboto, which is the custom font that Google developed. Since the method of delivering custom fonts has become so sophisticated (typically CDN), there really is no longer a reason to limit where you ...


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From a UX perspective, there is none, as long as the font is very legible. Remember, consistency is key when it comes to UX and Design.


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I’ve dealt with the same kind of problem on a big project and discovered some key insights: While relative time selection is useful under many circumstances, it’s not a complete solution in every context, particularly under more technical circumstances. In a troubleshooting workflow, for example, “Earlier than 2 hours ago” can be close to worthless. Power ...


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One of the many great things about my much beloved and sadly departed Macromedia Freehand tool was this very feature. You could put any mathematical equation into a field and it would calculate it on the fly for you. A lot of CAD software will do this. Including Sketchup. I agree that it's a great little feature. It can be completely unobtrusive as well ...


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I don't think it's laziness, I just think people are not convinced it's a user need, somehow. No, I agree it should be a standard. I'm using it all the time in the Illustrator, literally every session. It could come handy pretty much anywhere — in the personal fin tech, in quantified self apps, anywhere there are data inputs. What would also be nice is ...


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It would be easy to do, as evaluating expressions is a solved problem. However, in most cases it is not what the user would expect and also the validation, error-reporting, etc is a lot more complex, as you'd have to have some way of showing the user if their input wasn't valid. In general, for a well-designed application, it shouldn't be necessary to do ...


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Are you looking for something like a price range? (via tweakers.net) You can probably find a template or plugin of your liking online somewhere. If you need more than just a single selected range, though, you'll have to implement something more like what Stewart mentioned.


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I suggest abandon using +/- way of doing this, but try to use start date and end date approach, but with relative dates: [start date][2d ago][end date][now] --> means "analyse last 2 days" [start date][undefined][end date][3h ago] --> means "analyse all data that arrived not later than 3 hours ago" [start date][2d ago][end date][3h ago] --> means ...


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1. Pre-filling a text input increases cognitive load The function of a text input is to get text from a user. We need to tell a user what kind of text we are expecting and this can be done using labels, placeholders, inline hints, etc. A label directly above the text input is the best way to communicate what a user should input. As you have already ...


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This is a long discussion. For starters, this is a mobile driven solution, and like with almost anything in "mobile first" scenarios, there's a lot of voices attacking or defending the literal translation of these mobile solutions. First of all, I'd strongly recommend you to read the why and how the floating label pattern was created, by his creator. As you ...


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For controls used rarely, explicit is better than implicit If this widget were being used 100x a day, the answer might be an expert interface where the user can enter values like 10h8m, 1d23h5m etc. But, this is not your use case. You have stated that this widget will be used very rarely. In this case, it's much more important to make the interface ...


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Personally, I have to say I find the plus and minus symbols somewhat unintuitive... to me, "earlier than minus 2 hours" is a double negative that combines to mean "later than 2 hours", or something :) Are you restricted to two fields? With a second dropdown at the end, you could be more explicit, e.g.: [up to ] [ 3h] [ago] -- means "up to 12:45" ...


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I think your current approach carries a hefty cognitive load. You're anticipating the user being able to understand: That the scale is relative to the time right now That using a + or - alters the start or stop based on the time right now That they can specify time in days, hours and minutes with d/h/m Using your system, if I wanted a report that ended ...


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The simplest solution I can think of is a numerical text input followed by a drop down for unit size - something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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I think they are a perfect solution, as the interaction is right where the explanation is of what you'll fill in. Its as close as it can get, so there should be no confusion as to where one should click to start editing. It's the most natural mapping :-) Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_mapping_(interface_design)


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MS Outlook could be of use in this situation:


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You could update the labels to read like the sentence in natural language. Use default values for the secondary field so the user isn't forced to provide input. Frequency [ weekly v] for [ 2 ] weeks [ monthly v] for [ 2 ] months Or allow mode selection for termination [ weekly v] [ for v] [ 2 ] weeks [ weekly v] [ until v] [ {next week's ...


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Why not just set the label relevant to the selection from the first menu. So if they choose "Weekly" set the label to "Weeks" so when they pick 7 they'll know they're setting "7 weeks". Same for Daily/Days, Yearly/Years. You could also test putting a # sign or "Number of " in front of it so it will read "# weeks" or "number of weeks", that way it will ...


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"Repeat this event until" and then have a date selector. edit: date.


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I think its a hard question to form one answer to. Pure theoretically, I'd suggest not to rely on the user to know these abbreviatons like h,d,s,... or at least try to lower some cognitive load by explaining the use cleary (as Don Norman likes to call it, put the knowledge in the world instead of in the head). From the moment you introduce a syntax (like ...


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It really depends on how many tags there are, whether or not people are able to create tags on the fly and any other limitations or requirements you have. Tags are very flexible things, and there have been many implementations of these. Even one quick Google images search returns vastly different options! So the second part of your question: yes, there ...


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Just use a standard text field. Entering a postcode is not as hard as it may seem. You can use regex for whitespace separation and auto numeric and character switching. i.e. force the mobile keypad to switch between numbers and characters when postcode is typed since you know what pattern it could be. Auto-suggestion would be the best option here. Canadian ...


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One way to do it could be to glean the Postal Code using the Address and CanadaPost API https://www.canadapost.ca/pca/support/webservices If you absolutely want your user to input manually, you could to use 6 separate fields, with the type alternating between text and number (this would toggle the appropriate keyboard). The fields could be styled to appear ...


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You could, perhaps, try implementing something similar to Google Maps, where the user just starts to type in their address, sees possible addresses to choose from, and can choose one of them that is the address they are looking for, and not have to type in the whole address. For the US addresses I've used on Google Maps, I've never had to actually type ...



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