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5

The best? Only testing will tell. Going to both your examples, the second one is way better from an user point of view. See both dropdowns: one has a list of TLD and nothing else. The other, a list of TLD PLUS the price. And in the domain business, this is a huge difference since the newer TLD use to be way more expensive than the classic original TLD. ...


2

Dropdowns have: PRO: no needless waste of screen real estate with long lists CON: a user action is required before the user can see what the options are Dropdowns only really help if the list is long. 3 options is not a long list, and a radio button would make more sense in this case. Something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes ...


0

Your select only has three options which are mutually exclusive, so why not consider using radio buttons? The default radio button should be set to None. If you select another radio button, the UI should display the appropriate fields for that option (progressive disclosure).


0

Here is one of the solution. I tried my best to arrange the data. One thing I want to suggest you that in your first image you have arrange 3 fields in 1 row. So it looks very messy so always try to keep maximum 2 field. I also tried to arrange 3 fields in each row but again its not looking clean. So keep this. And in first image you have many number of ...


2

Here are some options to reduce cognitive load and make the task easier: Shorten your descriptions. 200 symbols * 19 options = 3800 symbols, which is roughly A4 sheet, full of text. Looks crazy. Substitute long description with short labels. For repetitive users this is OK, for the new ones provide some help/guide. E.g. "Home", "Professional", ...


3

Considering your design layout, I really think the best option is to use either checkboxes or radio buttons (depending on whether the user can select more than one option or not). Below is a quick mockup of what I mean: However, if you have a large number of options, this could prove to be problematic. In that case, I would consider having your Section C ...


1

In most (if not all) modern browsers and Operating Systems the menu of a dropdown is a separate (but not independent) object from the trigger. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This means that the text on the trigger can be safely truncated while the contents of the menu remain full length - Effectively showing the ...


0

I would prefer to hide them and show them on hover. this will bring to the user the idea that he must select (click) on a field to put a text. the user will play first with the pointer up and down and he will notice very easily that the input box will remain shown whenever he/she will click. I am not with the idea to hide it completely unless you click ... ...


0

If we are talking about a web page, on mobile devices with smaller screens, I can imagine the 'hide' approach being problematic. My own habit when browsing on mobile is to zoom in and 'fit' the width of the text I'm reading to the screen width (by double-tapping on the text). This way I have maximum text size without losing much information about where I am ...


14

Why have a separate text box for each field if the user can only input a value once? Just have a single text box to hold the value of whatever option they select: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The label of the box can change based on which option they select. You can either hide this field until they've ...



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