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21

When you grey out a control, you are communicating "something is currently disabled, but may become available if you do something else on the page". The only down-side of this approach is the disabled controls will occupy space on the page, so if those disabled controls are rarely used and/or there are many of them, it could be adding unnecessary visual ...


11

Why have a separate text box for each field if the user can only input a value once? Just have a single text box to hold the value of whatever option they select: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The label of the box can change based on which option they select. You can either hide this field until they've ...


6

I can see both sides of those designs and I don't think that either is "wrong" but I would always recommend keeping things simple for the user. In this instance, that would mean having the boxes visible but greyed out. This accomplishes two things: The user is aware from the beginning that they will need to prove additional text. Were the box hidden, ...


4

In the company where I work, the UX team always wants "every input visible to the user" firstly because you are communicating the user the whole process, and secondly because an appearing field is more hard to recognize, leading to many errors in filling the inputs before submitting the form. This is quite always true, but of course there are some edge ...


3

Considering your design layout, I really think the best option is to use either checkboxes or radio buttons (depending on whether the user can select more than one option or not). Below is a quick mockup of what I mean: However, if you have a large number of options, this could prove to be problematic. In that case, I would consider having your Section C ...


2

If you hide them first, and show them once a radio button has been chosen, you have to indicate that this is going to happen. If you don't, users might not expect this to happen, and can get confused or even annoyed by the fact they have to do "yet another" action to complete this part of the form. If you cannot clearly state somehow what the next step for ...


1

Here are some options to reduce cognitive load and make the task easier: Shorten your descriptions. 200 symbols * 19 options = 3800 symbols, which is roughly A4 sheet, full of text. Looks crazy. Substitute long description with short labels. For repetitive users this is OK, for the new ones provide some help/guide. E.g. "Home", "Professional", ...


1

In most (if not all) modern browsers and Operating Systems the menu of a dropdown is a separate (but not independent) object from the trigger. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This means that the text on the trigger can be safely truncated while the contents of the menu remain full length - Effectively showing the ...


1

Speaking as a former teacher filling in marks is something typically done after all of the papers/assignments have been graded. Thus one has ~30 scores to input, and the stack of assignments is in the order the pile is in (order ~= submission order) As such, the closer to a grid like (think Excel) format the better. In fact for speed I'd often re-order ...



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