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47

I would suggest a miniature progress wheel at the end of the input that only displays once a search is going on. I've seen this behavior before (I believe on user name boxes) and I believe that progress wheels are so clear that everyone will understand that something is going on. Once a user types, hide it briefly (or grey out to reduce flicker) and then ...


11

If I understood you right, then you are practically working on an autocomplete field. The standard for those is to offer search results like with a dropdown on the bottom. Therefore the easiest thing would be to add searching... as first item in the drop down whenever a search is performed. Maybe animate the … / three dots . .. ... (reset) ...


7

In the West we start writing and reading from the left and move to the right. As such, if the input would exceed the visible space of the input box, it makes logical sense to start from the left. If your centred search only allows for X characters, which would not take it past the bounds of the input box then the centred text-box could work. If you were ...


7

The most effective placeholder text I've seen is on the Polar sign up form. The placeholder text is an explanation of why the field is there or what the requirements for the field are. I can think of a couple reasons for this: Most people already know what a "First Name" is without you giving them an example. We don't expect to see full sentences in ...


4

Don't implement bad UX just because it's legacy. Updating several fields on different items and then save all elements in once is a really bad idea. How do you provide feedback to the user that item 1 (fields 1,6,7,8 where saved), item 2 (fields 2,4,5,6) were saved and item 3 (fields 2,3,7 where saved but field 9 has an illegal character) in an all-in-once ...


4

They are not cool! In western countries most of people read from left to right, aligning them to the left will increase the speed of people reading them thus completing their goal. There are a lot of good articles on uxmovement about this, also Luke's Werbowski book Web Form Design expalins everything you need to know about web forms...


4

It depends. If they are all off by a bit, then yea, from a pure visual consistency point of view, they probably should be tweaked to all be the same length. But if they are containing entirely different values, then it may not make sense. For instance, perhaps once drop down is state abbreviations, and the other is a list of ingredients found on a ...


3

I think the search icon (great icon by the way) can be used to make the user understand that a search is going on pretty much as is. The only changes I would make are: The icon should only be displayed while a search is going on, once the search is over the icon should disappear While the search is going on, the icon should be blinking (optional) The ...


2

The top answer is excellent, but I thought I would share an alternate idea for this. I would love to know if others think this is useable/a good idea, since I don't have any research or data to back this up: A colored bar, either on the right or bottom, like a "progress bar" shows how much relative text has been entered. It is green until some point, then ...


2

I suggest a grid so the user have the choice to focus on one phone at the time (vertically) or on the features (horizontally) download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

If we're talking iPhones 40px on a non-retina screen is the same height as 40px on a retina screen. The device doubles the height accordingly as needed on retina to make sure it's physically the same size.


1

You must have a clearly marked exit (Jakob Nielsen - Usability Engineering). You should have two buttons labeled "OK" and "Cancel". Do NOT add an "X", to avoid confusion.


1

I suggest progressive disclosure on this issue. Do not disable and enable them but instead keep them hidden until the approriate selection is made in the form. Then show them the field. http://www.nngroup.com/articles/progressive-disclosure/


1

Elessar is a library that lets you have one number line with multiple ranges that cannot overlap.


1

I am a bit confused by all the people suggesting this is about AutoComplete. AutoComplete suggests a completion of what you are typing, eg: Google suggesting search phrases. That is not the same as showing search results. I think conflating the two and the fact that a search is taking time is going to cause confusion. I like the idea of a little search ...


1

From what I understand, you want the user to be aware that the TaxCode field is a autocomplete field and a search is being performed as they type. In my experience, making the field a drop down with auto-complete filtering has worked. I'm assuming that the values in Tax Code are not random user generated values and that the value entered can be one of a ...


1

Well, if there is a use case, when a user needs to select several items at once for some reason, the second (new) design has a major flaw - there is no easy way to get all the items you want to show at the same time. You need to execute several searches. Otherwise, assuming there is no value in selecting several items at once, other than storing the ...



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