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There's a trend towards using CSS and/or Javascript to show and hide secondary or additional content on the Web. Here's an older example from CSSNewbie: Click 'See more' to view hidden content: Click 'Hide more' to hide revealed content: I'll leave it up to you to determine which approach is 'best'. This approach—designing 'More Info' as a hidden div ...


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It is ok to display a generic image of the product in the category page or as a primary picture. Even amazon does this. Only after the user goes into the details page will he/she get to know the available color choices and other options. As you already have a picture of the available product, it is ok to display it in the details page. This flow will work ...


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First of all, I'd say your example shows incorrect use of italics. Understand how traditional typography guides the use of italics: http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/finetypography/ht/italic_type.htm, http://practicaltypography.com/bold-or-italic.html. Web typography might deviate from traditional print typography but not by much. Italics add subtle ...


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Italics doesn't mean anything in and of itself. Context is what gives it meaning. In my first sentence, it means emphasis. But it can just as much mean de-emphasis in other contexts (such as your example) Ultimately italics is just a way to differentiate text. Use it as it makes sense to in the context of your UI.


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I've done this in a slightly low tech way before, sending a pair of screenshots of UI elements in an e-mail and simply asking for a reply of A or B. You could use Survey Monkey or similar to ask for responses too. It worked quite well, staff liked being asked for input on how the company website looked and felt, rather than being dictated too. Although I ...


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The problem with having a piece of information next to each field is that in many cases it is not necessary i.e. it is repeated or obvious information. You will end up being obliged to fill it in for everything, even when you don't want to. It's fine in the two examples you have, but as an often used design pattern, you may soon wish you hadn't committed to ...


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There are other ways to make elements appear as part of a group. If you place the email address in a label above the form, but make the space between the email address and the first text box the same size as the space between the 1st and 2nd text boxes, then people will automatically see them as a group (gestalt principles). The space between this form and ...


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I think the best option to figure it out is to study: How reviews are written in your particular site (e.g.:how long they are) How the people read those reviews (how many reviews they read, how many characters from each review they need to decide its usefulness, etc) Basically: do some user testing. My thoughts are that people caring enough to read a ...


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Depending on the font, italicised text is less legible. Wouldn't it be better to phrase the information so that it is all of a piece? e.g. "You need money in your account to order goods." (Too long, but you get the idea) And then add a call to action button - "Top up funds" (you don't want to lose the sale for lack of a CTA). If you wanted to stick with ...


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If the most important factor for you is to get more subscribers, then only ask for an email address. (I assume name and birthdate are irrelevant to the subscriptions. Though some newsletters might require subscribers to be of legal age, so date of birth would be necessary.) If gathering marketing info is more important to you, then you can ask for more, but ...


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There seems to be plenty of research around this particular topic, and not surprisingly it has been covered in a number of different psychology and marketing research papers (just google "optimal number of choices in a Likert scale"). Unfortunately, it is not easy to decide on what is the optimal number of choices because there are a number of different ...


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If the user is going to encounter a lot of these acronyms as they proceed through the app, reading articles, etc, perhaps you want to think about a toggle on the page that shifts the view between "full text" and "abbreviated text". If the user has to tap each acronym or definition to view the full details, then tap again to hide the full details, and there ...


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I'm assuming this are items for sale, so, what does it mean a lot? You want to make a sale, and you should not save efforts in doing so. Plus, any info that helps you close the sale is always useful. Plus, based in your description, I think you don't have a lot of info, but you have some "noise". First of all: assuming these are items for sale as mentioned ...



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