Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

I don't think this is about user intuition - it's much more about writing style and conventions. The norm in forms is that the heading serves a category label to the adjectives/nouns below. So Car Features should do the trick here. Another norm is to use imperative statements, but mostly for interactive controls (not labels), still you could also phrase ...


13

You could always use a Mad Libs style: I drive a [Color v] [Brand v].


12

You could try using the same approach Eclipse uses (or any other Java program I guess). They're using checkbox to indicate that all elements of the group are selected and a --symbol if only some of them are selected. Nothing selected All selected Not all elements selected One plus is that it's easy for the user to (un-)select the whole group. ...


6

The table is not organized in proper way, so you are trying to overcome this issue with your options. The problems are: Established reading pattern (by rows) makes it hard to distinguish the number (83%) as subtotal. It is perceived as normal row rather than subtotal one. Placing missed items info within the table is a logic error. The format of this row ...


5

Disclaimer: without more info as to what this is regarding, it's hard to say for sure. The following is based on gut feel. "I have a car..." feels more appropriate when it's contrasted with other sections, like "I have a motorcycle..." or "I have a bus...", perhaps with a top heading of "What kind of vehicle do you own?" That makes it easy to find the ...


5

I'm wondering if the success/fail values in your graph have the same properties as those generated by a continuous integration server: Successful builds are essentially boring Sequential failed builds usually have the same cause If so, you could bundle "runs" of the same status together in the chart, something like this: (The righthand five bubbles ...


5

I think you could use sparklines as a compact visualization tool. This view is not precise, but it allows to view errors distribution and total error count for each process. More precise information is displayed in process specific screen. Light grey bar is an observation time window (a week or two, etc.). Dark line is an error occured within observed ...


5

I don't see anything wrong with using a partial sentence ending in an ellipses as a user prompt if the answer you're asking the user to input is a natural ending to the sentence fragment in your label. As you currently have it, the prompt and answers don't make a proper sentence: I have a car... blue Toyota Compare that with: My car is a... blue ...


4

I will agree with Anindya on the aspect that keeping the prominence on the descriptions will make it useful since a user is more likely to know what is the "Capacity" instead of what is "32gb". When it comes to selecting the mode of prominence I would prefer using a subtle color to highlight as compared to using a "Bold" face. Something like As you see ...


4

Definitely Option B. Since you are listing them in pairs (today and yesterday), the most distinguishing factor between the two is not the value itself, but rather what day the value represents. Why? Because it designates the beginning of a trend or a point in a trend if you were displaying more than just 2 days. When looking at the bars, one naturally ...


4

The UX Book vs. The UX Scroll Having a single page of 1000+ entries is overwhelming. Whether it's quarterly reports or employee names, having that volume of them is massive. A user being able to sort their data is essential to agile navigation of data. I'd argue that aside from having more "pages" of data, having the option to sort the data in various ways ...


4

The problem is more deep than readability. I see some points of improvements. Problem The more important issue is uncompleted interaction which could break your business goal. The goal, as you mentioned, is to sell some product. So the interaction sequence should look like: Find product View product details Sell product Instead you have only steps ...


3

If not going with Majed's suggestion, I'd choose number 2. The reason is simple: With so much information, I need to quickly find what I'm looking for. With elements using the exact same vertical space (they are all aligned), I find this much easier to do in the second case. I can scan the labels really quickly, and from there I know it's just moving to the ...


3

I think the major issue is that there is so much information attacking the reader at once. You need to dull down the immediate amount of information to the necessities. When the user clicks on the row, then the full amount of information will be displayed on the right side. The current layout is making it really difficult for the users to find what they ...


3

You should allow the user to use standard practices to go back : Pressing Esc key should take the user Cancel/Close. Have a Back - icon followed by the context where it would go to. Have a CLOSE icon which closes the modal without change of State. Similar to #1. Clicking outside the modal should take the user back. Hitting the back button on the browser ...


3

You need to find a general tone that is appropriate given your users and the level of risk you want to protect them from. The right tone will be the one that your users find appropriate. They might resent your not warning them enough if one of their actions results in a big loss for instance and they feel they would have proceeded differently, had they been ...


2

Alexey's idea is clean and straightforward- made me think of this image from my Fitbit flex. Sort of what Alexey was proposing, but with some additional information in the form of a hover- giving specifics.


2

I bet you saw it many times. Just take a look: source I think you are supposed to develop something like the following: source


2

Why not use ellipsis to ask the user? When you end the sentence with an ellipsis, it looks like part of the sentence is missing. Ellipsis is mostly used to show the user the sentence is cut of. Here is an example of a question were the ellipsis is correctly used: Best aesthetically solution to overflowing data in a table


2

This seems to be a very specific problem, but what advantages are there to putting "Yesterday" after "Today". You need to have a very very good reason to violate chronological ordering, doubly so if you're going to use chronology as a large part of your legend. I just don't see it, (A) looks like a very bad idea. It certainly seems misleading, in (A) until ...


2

UI error messages should be direct, objective statements which the user only has to read once to understand. I personally perceive zero differences between input is invalid and input is not valid ^ However if I came across either of those messages then I would immediately assume the programmer was too lazy to tell me what was invalid and now I have to go ...


2

Users should never have to remember information from one screen to another (ux-discovery). Users should also always have feedback that makes them aware of their current status (in this case the progress they have made through the wizard) (ux-feedback). I would say that providing a little summary panel / column at the left side of the wizard is good practice ...


1

Realistically, "input is invalid" and "input is not valid" are the same. Neither is a negative frame of the other. Typically, negative frames are not recommended, because the mind typically has to flip itself to understand the instruction. For example, "Don't think of an elephant" is an impossible instruction to follow. In other words, you may ...


1

Word clouds are completely useless. Two patterns here (making a bunch of assumptions about your needs) might be: Perform semantic analysis on the answers to strip away filler words (and possibly group together phrases), and then display words by frequency in a simple bar chart. Bar charts are one of the easiest-to-understand visualizations of categorical ...


1

Yes and No. This begs the question: Why would one need to have persisting information from one screen to another in the wizard in the first place? Here are some examples that show both cases. Tax Applications and Long Wizards Tax Applications such as Quicktax forces the user to go through a number of wizards but only persists the absolutely necessary ...


1

I would say A is preferred because users read from left to right. Equally, age is often demonstrated as in the past and therefore on the left (think of history timelines and calendars) I tried to do a quick Google for you to see what, well, Google were doing but I was only able to pull off a Salesforce and MediaPost example. Both of which demonstrate that A ...


1

I don't know what the two different lines (orange, blue) represent. But as an indicator you could highlight the data point from that particular day in a different color and add the number of medications inside.


1

Checkout the Web Credibility Project. That and actual security enhancements like using HSTS...and perhaps a visible notice of that fact on all pages.


1

Try searching for "Accessibility API", "UI Automation" or looking at Microsoft UI Automation. These types of tools allow you to access and even invoke menus and other UI elements in another application. Screen readers, screen magnifiers and such use this technique to make computers more accessible for the visually impaired and those with other ...


1

With assumptions and without seeing the example: Graying out a control typically means its read-only, static or not editable. A missing element means, well, that it does not exist. If the icon is tightly coupled with the control (its a clickable element or the like in context) then it should appear as the control does. My other opinion is a screen with ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible