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9

Short Answer: They never intersect, as described, at a single "hail mary" point. They are different elements of the same process and should coexist together as part of that process. In the cases where one may be dependent on the other, the most ideal situation is that Information Architecture would guide the Software Architecture. Long Answer: When you ...


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I will agree with Anindya on the aspect that keeping the prominence on the descriptions will make it useful since a user is more likely to know what is the "Capacity" instead of what is "32gb". When it comes to selecting the mode of prominence I would prefer using a subtle color to highlight as compared to using a "Bold" face. Something like As you see ...


3

As per this article I found,the amount of time spent in searching for information has grown by 13% since 2002. To quote the article A recent IHS Knowledge Collections Webinar provided an interesting statistic by Outsell: an engineer’s time spent searching for information has increased 13% since 2002. A new survey by SearchYourCloud revealed ...


3

You need to find a general tone that is appropriate given your users and the level of risk you want to protect them from. The right tone will be the one that your users find appropriate. They might resent your not warning them enough if one of their actions results in a big loss for instance and they feel they would have proceeded differently, had they been ...


3

You should allow the user to use standard practices to go back : Pressing Esc key should take the user Cancel/Close. Have a Back - icon followed by the context where it would go to. Have a CLOSE icon which closes the modal without change of State. Similar to #1. Clicking outside the modal should take the user back. Hitting the back button on the browser ...


2

Users should never have to remember information from one screen to another (ux-discovery). Users should also always have feedback that makes them aware of their current status (in this case the progress they have made through the wizard) (ux-feedback). I would say that providing a little summary panel / column at the left side of the wizard is good practice ...


2

UI error messages should be direct, objective statements which the user only has to read once to understand. I personally perceive zero differences between input is invalid and input is not valid ^ However if I came across either of those messages then I would immediately assume the programmer was too lazy to tell me what was invalid and now I have to go ...


2

I would call it a "Drawer" (such as the app drawer on Android), but there are many possible terms for this kind of thing (tray, slide-up overlay, popup, etc.).


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While (as @inkmarble mentioned) clicking may be more effort compared to a mouse-over we now also have to keep in mind the growing amount of users on touch-only devices. With the current state of the art, there simply is no way to mouse-over an icon on a touch device, thus making this help information inaccessible to this user group. Example: I recently got ...


1

I would not show pricing for non-commercial customers on the page. Reasons: Those prices will be irrelevant to the vast majority of users. So it will just add unnecessary clutter and choice. The paradox of choice shows that having more choices actually makes it more difficult for users to buy, and you want to reduce, not increase purchase friction. Then ...


1

The simple and nearly 'objective' answer is: Yes. Here's a example that proves the rule (reductio ad absurdum): an entire non-zoomable wiki page on a mobile screen. With that out of the way, maybe a more helpful answer starts by rephrasing your question to: Can one display too much information relative to the user's needs? As with most things ...


1

I think the answer is pretty obvious, but let's address a general problem. I will refer to Edward Tufte and Leonardo da Vinci Simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication. Leonardo da Vinci (source) Principles of Visual Data Presentation The principles of effective information design are as old as classical rhetoric. Indeed, in the ...


1

It seems as a good solution. The result will depend a lot on visual and micro-copy you'll use. Maybe combination with an icon indicating there's some more information hidden would be nice to discover the hidden content if it fits the rest of your UI. Or a tutorial that tells the user about it when working with the UI for the first time. Just keep in mind ...


1

Have you tried using colors? if colors are not an options, then different shades of grey with different variations of weights should help. remember, just because one column is important that does not mean other columns do no needs any effects(like less important columns could be made thinner or with different shades grey to reduce importance) My suggestion, ...


1

First of all, they could be perceived as subsets or specific cases of a continuum, common enough to get special treatment. But there are also differences. Alphabetical order is "arbitrary" to some extent, it doesn't tell you anything about the actual properties of an item. If you deal in clothing and your continuum is Size, you could say "I want to see the ...


1

Realistically, "input is invalid" and "input is not valid" are the same. Neither is a negative frame of the other. Typically, negative frames are not recommended, because the mind typically has to flip itself to understand the instruction. For example, "Don't think of an elephant" is an impossible instruction to follow. In other words, you may ...


1

I wasn't able to find anything specifically addressing this in the UI guidelines from Apple or Microsoft, but Chrome uses a similar method of conveying information in the Omnibox. It uses the globe to indicate a website and a magnifying glass to indicate a search. Chrome also uses color to distinguish the different types of selection, which may be ...


1

What I have done for cultivating a user research 'database' is actually several things: Personas User needs roadmapping - mapping all the themes I am hearing for new features along a timeline, with cross references to specific customers User maps - I take specific goals that customers are trying to achieve and segment maybe our top customers against that ...


1

Fuzzy logic No system is perfect; you're cataloging things based on layers of interpretation. I'm in the midst of defining such a process for a new team now. Every time I do this, I find myself reconsidering the format. But it gets the job done. Here's where I am at the moment. The specifics will change based on the application, but the fundamentals are ...


1

Building up a database like this sounds pretty cool, and potentially very useful. The difficulty lies in understanding what the data will be used for. One way to start scoping this out would be to make a list of the top 20 questions you have about users at the beginning of any project. This will provide you a path to defining a clear list of dimensions and ...


1

Market research people talk about customer/market segmentation analysis, which involves some of these types of segmentation (there are probably more): Geographical: based on the physical location/region of the customer Demographic: based on age, gender, racial, etc Behavioural: types of consumer behaviour (but we can convert this to user mental models) ...


1

Could you use an initial prompt when you choose to create the document, and split that dialog in two sections - those that are available in this location and those that aren't? But still give them feedback / info about how they can create the documents they want. Something like this perhaps? download bmml source – Wireframes created with ...


1

A user should be able to create a document anywhere in your system. Declaring its type is totally fine, as is it auto-filing the document. Assuming that to be true, after the user picks the type and saves the document, show a temporary notification in the UI acknowledging the system saved the document with a link to where it filed location. Another thing ...


1

Officially, no, you can request what you want, when you want it. However, if you adopt the idea that you can request contact information up front, you'll likely get a lot more false information. People don't want to enter their data unless they want to be contacted. If they haven't yet taken your survey, they don't yet know if they want you to contact ...


1

In "Design with the mind in mind", author Jeff Johnson dedicates chapter 14 ("We have time requirements") to the "durations of perceptual and cognitive processes, and based on those, provides real-time deadlines that interactive systems must meet to synchronize well with human users" in order to be effective and perceived as responsive. In the chapter you ...


1

One solution is to provide two modes to build flexible system: Scan mode auto-scans the subset of most important params (gray-filled) with delay of 1s. Manual mode is activated with additional key. Then displayed params are switched manually, by each key press. If no action is performed for 4s, then device automatically switches to Scan mode again. ...


1

Using words like "star" or "favorite" usually imply some sort of bookmarking or tagging, which in this use case would not communicate to the user the true meaning of the interaction. The three examples below are similar in that they explicitly label the action using words that are unambiguous. Any variation on the wording below would be acceptable so long ...


1

Aligning the labels combined with whitespace and bolding them. Always think in terms of scannable content. People will generally want to scan the label, not the value. It makes digesting the information easier. It's a simple information hierarchy issue.


1

Word clouds are completely useless. Two patterns here (making a bunch of assumptions about your needs) might be: Perform semantic analysis on the answers to strip away filler words (and possibly group together phrases), and then display words by frequency in a simple bar chart. Bar charts are one of the easiest-to-understand visualizations of categorical ...


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Yes and No. This begs the question: Why would one need to have persisting information from one screen to another in the wizard in the first place? Here are some examples that show both cases. Tax Applications and Long Wizards Tax Applications such as Quicktax forces the user to go through a number of wizards but only persists the absolutely necessary ...



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