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7

Allow users to update their age. Why? Users can make a mistake during initial age entry. Users may also provide a fake age when initially registering with your site if they (1) were asked for personal information without understanding why, (2) didn't realize precision mattered beyond choosing a date over some age threshold like 18, or (3) before they ...


4

I think you should allow users to correct their age (date of birth, or whatever). Sometimes people create their accounts and they don't care about some stuff, or they don't want to give too much info about themselves (I'm one of those people :) ). And after they realise that it wasn't such a good idea, they would like to correct it to buy your goods. On the ...


4

1ST ANSWER: I normally don't really care about the terminology used to describe the assets that are created using a UCD process, but I do care about the quality and accuracy of the information it captures. So to me I think your description of the two types of information captured is pretty close to the mark, but I couldn't tell you if that's the exact ...


3

There's a trend towards using CSS and/or Javascript to show and hide secondary or additional content on the Web. Here's an older example from CSSNewbie: Click 'See more' to view hidden content: Click 'Hide more' to hide revealed content: I'll leave it up to you to determine which approach is 'best'. This approach—designing 'More Info' as a hidden div ...


2

You should My friend had a problem, that he accidentally mis-set his age. Then, he couldn't change it, and because it was a kind-of age oriented service, and he stopped using it. I don't really remember, but it might be Steam or Origin. So you really should enable people to change them age, such as sex and name. There are transgender people out there. ...


2

The problem with having a piece of information next to each field is that in many cases it is not necessary i.e. it is repeated or obvious information. You will end up being obliged to fill it in for everything, even when you don't want to. It's fine in the two examples you have, but as an often used design pattern, you may soon wish you hadn't committed to ...


2

It is ok to display a generic image of the product in the category page or as a primary picture. Even amazon does this. Only after the user goes into the details page will he/she get to know the available color choices and other options. As you already have a picture of the available product, it is ok to display it in the details page. This flow will work ...


2

I've done this in a slightly low tech way before, sending a pair of screenshots of UI elements in an e-mail and simply asking for a reply of A or B. You could use Survey Monkey or similar to ask for responses too. It worked quite well, staff liked being asked for input on how the company website looked and felt, rather than being dictated too. Although I ...


2

First of all, I'd say your example shows incorrect use of italics. Understand how traditional typography guides the use of italics: http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/finetypography/ht/italic_type.htm, http://practicaltypography.com/bold-or-italic.html. Web typography might deviate from traditional print typography but not by much. Italics add subtle ...


2

Italics doesn't mean anything in and of itself. Context is what gives it meaning. In my first sentence, it means emphasis. But it can just as much mean de-emphasis in other contexts (such as your example) Ultimately italics is just a way to differentiate text. Use it as it makes sense to in the context of your UI.


2

So you're basically replacing the visual variable of position to denote a negative value with the visual variable of colour - this has been termed a 'mirrored' chart. The positives as you're seeing is that it saves space, the negatives are people may not understand it and it may cause some issues for the colour-blind (though red-blue problems are not as ...


2

Information Architecture is a huge subject (so much so there is a very large but excellent book written by Louis Rosenfeld and Peter Morville on the subject - Information Architecture for the World Wide Web 3rd Edition). A site map is a simple output of all of the AI work, and is consumable by the end user.


2

Here are 2 links after a quick research with the keywords "Table UI" http://semantic-ui.com/collections/table.html http://www.noupe.com/design/better-ui-design-proper-use-of-tables.html


1

Absolutely not Here's why: Generally, a persons name,brithdate,sex and other permanent individual criteria do not change. If your website is trying to restrict underage people to purchase items that they arent allowed to purchase by law, it would be irresponsible to let them change their age whenever they feel like it since this is pretty much one of the ...


1

As you know you're relying on colour to depict up/down which isn't great especially as both types of change are reflected in an upward facing bar. Some ideas 1) Place the change as a label on each bar e.g. -17% or +38% 2) Change to up and down bars and move it up above the tab labels like below 3) Move the negative change bars below the tab labels ...


1

Make negative values go below the axis. Your proposed design may gain slightly in the level of precision shown. However, I doubt this really matters. Even if you keep the chart in the same vertical space, I think you will adequately show the differences between bars. Plotting positive and negative values both in the same direction makes the chart a lot ...


1

There are other ways to make elements appear as part of a group. If you place the email address in a label above the form, but make the space between the email address and the first text box the same size as the space between the 1st and 2nd text boxes, then people will automatically see them as a group (gestalt principles). The space between this form and ...


1

Depending on the font, italicised text is less legible. Wouldn't it be better to phrase the information so that it is all of a piece? e.g. "You need money in your account to order goods." (Too long, but you get the idea) And then add a call to action button - "Top up funds" (you don't want to lose the sale for lack of a CTA). If you wanted to stick with ...


1

If the most important factor for you is to get more subscribers, then only ask for an email address. (I assume name and birthdate are irrelevant to the subscriptions. Though some newsletters might require subscribers to be of legal age, so date of birth would be necessary.) If gathering marketing info is more important to you, then you can ask for more, but ...


1

I think the best option to figure it out is to study: How reviews are written in your particular site (e.g.:how long they are) How the people read those reviews (how many reviews they read, how many characters from each review they need to decide its usefulness, etc) Basically: do some user testing. My thoughts are that people caring enough to read a ...


1

If the user is going to encounter a lot of these acronyms as they proceed through the app, reading articles, etc, perhaps you want to think about a toggle on the page that shifts the view between "full text" and "abbreviated text". If the user has to tap each acronym or definition to view the full details, then tap again to hide the full details, and there ...



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