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There's a trend towards using CSS and/or Javascript to show and hide secondary or additional content on the Web. Here's an older example from CSSNewbie: Click 'See more' to view hidden content: Click 'Hide more' to hide revealed content: I'll leave it up to you to determine which approach is 'best'. This approach—designing 'More Info' as a hidden div ...


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Navigating as a side effect of some other action is not a good idea, I feel. Similar to pushing the user around... Why not show an empty Topic page where some stuff looks like it will look after approval, such as title and creator link (if any), while the content area (where posts will appear after approval) shows a message saying "Topic is waiting for ...


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I would not show pricing for non-commercial customers on the page. Reasons: Those prices will be irrelevant to the vast majority of users. So it will just add unnecessary clutter and choice. The paradox of choice shows that having more choices actually makes it more difficult for users to buy, and you want to reduce, not increase purchase friction. Then ...


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It helps that you stated your design intent clearly: it's about communicating volume/diversity of the changelog rather than the details. Some modern approaches to spicing up long, sectionalized content (use desktop browser to view the examples): Sticky section headers Parallax and scroll-updating navbars (scroll down to see effect) Timeline layout ...


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It is ok to display a generic image of the product in the category page or as a primary picture. Even amazon does this. Only after the user goes into the details page will he/she get to know the available color choices and other options. As you already have a picture of the available product, it is ok to display it in the details page. This flow will work ...


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I've done this in a slightly low tech way before, sending a pair of screenshots of UI elements in an e-mail and simply asking for a reply of A or B. You could use Survey Monkey or similar to ask for responses too. It worked quite well, staff liked being asked for input on how the company website looked and felt, rather than being dictated too. Although I ...


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First of all, I'd say your example shows incorrect use of italics. Understand how traditional typography guides the use of italics: http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/finetypography/ht/italic_type.htm, http://practicaltypography.com/bold-or-italic.html. Web typography might deviate from traditional print typography but not by much. Italics add subtle ...


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Italics doesn't mean anything in and of itself. Context is what gives it meaning. In my first sentence, it means emphasis. But it can just as much mean de-emphasis in other contexts (such as your example) Ultimately italics is just a way to differentiate text. Use it as it makes sense to in the context of your UI.


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The problem with having a piece of information next to each field is that in many cases it is not necessary i.e. it is repeated or obvious information. You will end up being obliged to fill it in for everything, even when you don't want to. It's fine in the two examples you have, but as an often used design pattern, you may soon wish you hadn't committed to ...


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There are other ways to make elements appear as part of a group. If you place the email address in a label above the form, but make the space between the email address and the first text box the same size as the space between the 1st and 2nd text boxes, then people will automatically see them as a group (gestalt principles). The space between this form and ...


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Depending on the font, italicised text is less legible. Wouldn't it be better to phrase the information so that it is all of a piece? e.g. "You need money in your account to order goods." (Too long, but you get the idea) And then add a call to action button - "Top up funds" (you don't want to lose the sale for lack of a CTA). If you wanted to stick with ...


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If the most important factor for you is to get more subscribers, then only ask for an email address. (I assume name and birthdate are irrelevant to the subscriptions. Though some newsletters might require subscribers to be of legal age, so date of birth would be necessary.) If gathering marketing info is more important to you, then you can ask for more, but ...


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I think the best option to figure it out is to study: How reviews are written in your particular site (e.g.:how long they are) How the people read those reviews (how many reviews they read, how many characters from each review they need to decide its usefulness, etc) Basically: do some user testing. My thoughts are that people caring enough to read a ...


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There seems to be plenty of research around this particular topic, and not surprisingly it has been covered in a number of different psychology and marketing research papers (just google "optimal number of choices in a Likert scale"). Unfortunately, it is not easy to decide on what is the optimal number of choices because there are a number of different ...


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I'm assuming this are items for sale, so, what does it mean a lot? You want to make a sale, and you should not save efforts in doing so. Plus, any info that helps you close the sale is always useful. Plus, based in your description, I think you don't have a lot of info, but you have some "noise". First of all: assuming these are items for sale as mentioned ...


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As you said, since the user made a conscious decision to add the product in the wishlist, an image card can be a good thing to be shown as the main object, then try to the title of the product on that, but it is not that important, so if the text is tool long use "..." to just fit that in one line on top of the image card. For the last 3 items ("Good Deal" ...


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Feedback If your entity creation process has "serious" implications for your users, and especially if it may involve them taking actions outside your app (booking a ticket somewhere, buying something and retrieving a tracking number), you may want to print a summary page where they get key information about how you identify the entity they've created and ...


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The simple and nearly 'objective' answer is: Yes. Here's a example that proves the rule (reductio ad absurdum): an entire non-zoomable wiki page on a mobile screen. With that out of the way, maybe a more helpful answer starts by rephrasing your question to: Can one display too much information relative to the user's needs? As with most things ...


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What I have done for cultivating a user research 'database' is actually several things: Personas User needs roadmapping - mapping all the themes I am hearing for new features along a timeline, with cross references to specific customers User maps - I take specific goals that customers are trying to achieve and segment maybe our top customers against that ...


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I know this was answered a long time ago, but FTR it's wrong to remove price ranges from sites that sell services. There's a huge body of UX and usability / market research around this issue; for example, see one of the Nielsen-Norman group's articles: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/show-price/ Companies rationalize reasons for not revealing prices ...



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