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You could try the label "Also read" or "Also read about" to replace "Other content" since it gives the idea there is something else to read as well with a subliminal message of being some content different from the product information.


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As per my above comments, here is a suggested task-based hierarchy: - Product - Descriptions - Ratings & Reviews - List Pages - Non-Product - General Content - Information - News - FAQ


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In his book Don't make me think!, including its 2013 revisited edition, Steve Krug defines Utilities as: Links to important elements of the site that aren’t really part of the content hierarchy. He also offers an example list of them for an eCommerce site which includes News and FAQs. From that perspective, this could be a solution: Utilities ...


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[I don't have enough rep to comment] In my personal experience, i prefer to see a word 'More' than 'Other', and that would be my suggestion. Remove the word content-as it is redundant for website(a site itself means some form of content - text/audio/video etc) So you can try either of these: More Links More Links Hope this helps.


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With a product like insurance, where legalities, details, fine print, and frequently asked questions are commonplace, a footer with links to such things enhances the experience without distraction.


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I would imagine that after you get a quote you might want to have the option to link to other things. Not everyone will immediately continue to buy, and they might leave the site entirely if you don't provide links to other parts of your site at this point. If the goal is keeping the user, then saving their progress and allowing them to come back to it at a ...


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Yes it is bad practice. You will limit the user in quickly scanning the menu items, as they have to read the entire label. Try grouping them in one label name, include an extra name you want people to see that before clicking on it (e.g. search) You might consider the following list: - Visitors - Sales - Navigation & search - Settings In case you ...


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I see benefits for you but none for your users. Merging 2 different websites can be very confusing for customers because each plateform got its own identity, its own personnality.


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The NN Group published an article about using photos on the web, but it also covers off where people look on webpages with one of the findings covered off a large Bio page - a photo of each of the employees and a brief blurb about them all. All on one long page (the screenshot below is split into three, but in reality it is one long page). Here, the ...


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It's not uncommon to access the same content (view or screen) from different places. The hierarchical model have been great organizing content but lacked the ability to find related content. That's the idea of faceted navigation pattern. You don’t have to go back to the start screen to access another related screen in a different branch of the hierarchy. ...


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The menu items for the slide-out should remain consistent across your app. Having a different menus will only end up confusing your users. Thus the list should be the same regardless of section. For the featured list on the home page, I'd explore expanding these items to differentiate from their slide-out menu counterparts. A short description or maybe a ...


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Android developers actually started this design pattern quite a while ago. In the jelly bean release Google actually made this a stock feature in the android SDK. The reasoning for explaining this is because Google and all of their geniuses working in the android team have come up with some good design guidelines for "navigation drawers". they should be ...


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From the phrasing of your question it sounds like you are looking for a quantitative solution ("what percentage of the 100 pages" and "constrain them to five answers"). It is really hard to design surveys properly. You need to ask the right questions to the right people. You need to be aware of self-selection of participants, and how this may impact your ...


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I would say that it depends. I know of an e-commerce site that does this on it's home and category pages, which contain both a horizontal and vertical category menu. The horizontal menu uses drop down menus that show it's subcategories while the vertical menus show a limited number of "popular" categories. The website can be found at svetbot.cz - try ...



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