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2

This is a very interesting topic. Opinions of information scientists are mixed but we're now getting better view with more empirical research done in this field. Along with some papers on SIGCHI, I have also referred to a study by Alexis Wichowski and would be discussing this in more detail below: Empirical study on governing folksonomy tags A paper by ...


0

Well, first of all, you have to define whether you need this for desktop, mobile (app) or desktop and mobile combined (responsive). This is paramount to your question, because you have some specific needs that require different approaches depending on context. If you're going for desktop, I think something like "mega menu dropdown" is the more tempting ...


3

It seems like yours is a moderately to deep hierarchy problem. In this case, you can take hint from Khan Academy. They too have Subjects > Categories > Sub-categories > More sub categories Each subcategory usually has a longer description. Clicking on subjects reveals a list of subjects, which in turn shows a list of sub-categories on hover. ...


0

I agree with your decision to display the "invited" tab after the invitations are sent. Confirmation is huge aspect of UX that only gets noticed when it's not there. You've handled this using the dialogue box, but by showing the user the invited tab, you also inform them that they can check on the status of invitations in this view. However, if the user is ...


7

It sounds like your real problem isn’t designing how to show a link is non-reversible. Your real problem is your app has committed the cardinal sin of breaking the Back button, which is an issue going beyond how you mark links in each list item. Solving the Real Problem Solutions, from most to least preferred: Fix the Back button. Okay, you say that the ...


1

1. Same B2C product with small customizations / a few additional features for B2B - Provide menu on the same page. I guess this is what you are looking for. I have also provided two other business scenarios. 2. Same product but more features/ extensive tool kit / premiere services - A link on home page that redirects to professionals/Business page ...


1

The last option you mentioned "A completely separate, professional-focused website" would seem the least desirable, as it would not be very flexible/scalable in response to additional professional categories being identified in the future. A "modal" on a web site does not seem like good practice. A combination of the remainder of what you suggested may be ...


0

I will likely answer with more information later, but I am working on a quite similar problem. I would suggest looking at the following resources, which offer extended discussions of the issues you seek to solve: Everything Is Miscellaneous: The Power of the New Digital Disorder by David Weinberger Keeping Found Things Found: The Study and Practice of ...


-1

Folders are Dead, long live Folders. Folders died on Windows computers in 2004 with Google Desktop, on Mac in 2005 with Smart Folders, and in mail in 2004 with Gmail. However, all of these look to the user much like folders. Social media is another example of the use of labels instead of folders. Just because you've put your post in the #yolo folder, it ...


0

Databases have better performance and they can be indexed by many criterias. Filesystems usually waste a lot of space and are slow and the indexing is delegated to the user... so the users tend to search the filesystem, which is slow, resource consuming, frozes the machine, etc.


0

It's hard to say if the folder structure will ever truly die, but we can safely say it's been evolving for a number of years. As far back as 2007 in Windows Vista, the user saw their folder structure separated by carets:       Clicking to the right of this area revealed the actual folder structure in its proper back-slash format:   ...


0

Working on something similar, we have found through analytics that an open course is primarily completed chronologically. If you tell a user they can't do something a certain way they will be discouraged. But if you allow them freedom they will by habit follow the same model that a set of rules would have imposed. Also, if content is created in a way so that ...


0

Search and grouping by automatically extracted aspects are powerful tools but they don't solve the same problems as a folder structure may do: Search is good for finding a file when you know what you are looking for; and you can find similar candidates in the results, which is sometimes helpful, too. Automatic grouping (by location, by time, etc.) is ...


3

Tree view is often complicated and counter-intuitive to the users, but it has several strong advantages: full names which are unique identifiers I mean, if I access a file named /etc/passwd I know I access a particular file. There is no way I get /home/backup/passwd instead. Tags don't give you this garantee: if you have found exactly one object tagged ...


1

In the past many users were often confronted with an implementation model. The digital structure of operating systems - based on files and folders - was directly passed through to the UI. People were and still are willing to „container“ the information they find or create in to this structure. But only to a certain extent. Since we are human beings whos ...


1

They aren't dying, just finally revealing their limitations. In the age of limited processing power and os capabilities, folders were the easiest way to structure data. But not the best, as there's just one dimension to it - that is space. Tagging and taxonomies (word searching being just another one of those) came and added any number of dimensions, to ...


5

Folder structure is not dying However, its importance and prevalence in the average user's interface is. The truth is that a user will find the path of least resistance to accomplish their desired task. With this in mind, maintaining folder structure would have to become their desired task. For the average Joe, nope! The average person has become ...


11

Most people tend to think that certain aspects of technology die away, but I always get the feeling that it is far more common for it to "sediment". Whenever I see a new trend, it usually never ends like "this is the new best way". Normally it is more like "we solved this problem with one global solution, but now it seems there are different solutions for ...


104

Rumors of its death are greatly exaggerated ✞... Classic hierarchical folder views aren't dying. But they are being complemented by other ways of viewing and interacting with files. The key trend here is the decoupling of views from the underlying file system. The old world...One truth ⇨ One view Historically, file UX was heavily tied to the ...


3

Maybe more true thing to say would be that concept of folder structure as file organizing strategy is dying. Or maybe more true: organizing files/documents is becoming more and more automated. If we have concept of categories and one file can be in two categories then I would really dislike doing manual organization. Therefore all these new technologies use ...


7

Search helps if you know what you are looking for (obvious). If you don't know what you are looking for, a folder structure can help you find it. For example, if you are looking for a recipe for chicken Florentine, search will help you find it, or if you have chicken and want a recipe that uses it, search may help there too. But if you just want to cook ...


5

As tools (software and hardware) increase in speed, the value of search begins to eclipse the value of a folder structure as a way to find a file. On my PC, my MacBook, and my phone, it's simply faster to search for items by terminology rather than seek it out visually. Most file systems still need a folder structure, so it's not dying, it's just that ...


46

It's not dying completely, but it is becoming a power user niche feature. Everyone has seen or heard stories about the user who stores everything on their desktop or in a single My Documents folder. Humans are terrible at justifying a large upfront cost like creating and managing dozens of folders just for a possible, small benefit in the future like being ...


10

Probably. But it's a slow painful death. It essentially boils down to the need to put something somewhere where we can find it again, or where we can direct someone else to finding it. We are naturally predisposed to putting things in containers or compartmentalizing in such a way that even if it's a long time before we come back then we can still have a ...


14

Categorization of content is still very important, even after the rise of smartphones. Whether that's by date, by location, or by tags. The more and more popular use of smartphones since 2007 has forced designers to come up with simpler user experiences. Manually putting stuff in folders can usually be considered a bad ux experience, which is why in a lot ...



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