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When I design questionnaires for mobile, I preload all the questions and display one at a time. That way there's no need for scrolling and each question can be large and clearly laid out, but users also don't have to sit through painful page loads. You can do this quite easily with jQuery Mobile's data-role="page" attribute. To prevent data loss in case the ...


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Answering my own question to address a few points since no one else has addressed them fully. Yes, the API documentation should have these details. These details are absolutely critical in many scenarios including the survival of the language sometimes. Also, there are some downsides to them as well. Why it should be there Easier learning curve While it ...


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You should organize your site in a way that makes sense to users, supports their goals, and helps your business/client meet its goals. Rather than trying to "win" this argument, I'd encourage you to get on the same page with your coworkers...Part of doing that is making sure you're using the same language to mean the same things. But because that's probably ...


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I definitely agree that documentation should contain the extra information that you suggest, but at the same time that is hard to get right, boring to do and takes effort. John Resig (creator of jQuery), in an interview about Building jQuery at 4:19 into the interview, talks about how his documentation with examples of jQuery was one of the best early ...


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One technique that's been helpful in our work is to break the processes down into successive levels of detail. Show each level with a reasonable amount of detail. Then, break down any step that doesn't have enough detail into its own diagram. For example, mapping the process to "Get ready for school" might look like: Even without going into any more ...


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You could make it interactive using some simple javascript code. Check out tree diagram block on d3.js here : http://bl.ocks.org/d3noob/8375092 Interactive tree diagrams can help you hide smaller branches unless you want to see them. Hence, user navigation through large tree maps becomes easy and understandable.


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I usually make my documentation 11"x14" (tabloid size). Even so, some diagrams still get too large, so on the main diagram I'll show blank placeholders and diagram those subsections individually. Label each placeholder with an ID number so the subsections on the subsequent pages can be more easily found. I've done this plenty of times, usually needing just ...


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Yes, having all of this information directly in the documentation is quite useful. Good documentation gives you all of the information you need to understand the API, interface, or other tool--and this is something which goes beyond a simple technical description of how it works. There are examples of documentation that does this. One that I am familiar ...


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I have used a few APIs and went through the documentation. Developers usually do not refer to the API documentation to make judgement about whether they should use it or not/ where does this API stand with respect to others etc. The API documentation is used only when you know you are going to give it a try. It's treated like a piece of document that's ...


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Showing a separate content page prior to login is probably going to get ignored. I know I probably would ignore it. Here is one example that may accomplish your goal well. I would keep the content simple and high-level with no more than three bullet points if you are going to use any. Keep the page load time as low as possible since retaining current ...


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I would recommend an split page design. One side can have the content (with scroll if required) and the other the login info. Provided the legal team approves the content shown is ok to be seen by public. With just a link i am not sure if it can be protected The advantages being Save the user time and one step Don't have to force the user to go through ...


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Addressing the strict situation you've described, without asking questions about alternatives to finding that content, I'd recommend you register people selecting the page in Treejack on which the content is linked to as a 'success' for them finding that content. If you at all expect or want the user to navigate to subsequent pages, however, or re-orient ...


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I think there is a clue in the name, Call To Action. In your example, the call to action for a page about an online community would be "Join our team" or "Sign up" or "Join our community" -- so the rule would be that there should be a verb and a reference back to the content of the headline and/or page. There's an excellent article by Paul Boag with 10 ...



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