New answers tagged

0

It essentially depends on the type of Application you're developing. If it's a bot that gets things done and replies from time to time according to your query, I think the Messenger app is the better platform to choose. I think the days of people using bots on a Website are over since people are mostly mobile these days. Instead of having one to open the ...


2

It has already been pointed out in the comments, but I'll provide an answer to elaborate on some of the points made. As you know, line graphs connect data points that have a relationship between successive values, such that taken as a whole they can reveal trends or patterns over another variable (generally temporal like time). If your focus is on the ...


1

As Michael Lai has already said, bar or column charts seem perfect for what you are describing. You can use stacked charts to show the relationships between items within each queue: I threw this together in about 2 minutes using Google Charts and didn't really have the time to go and fiddle with the colours or ordering but you could quite easily show ...


0

I am not sure why you think bar charts are not good for monitoring views, since the monitoring view requires only information to be provided in real-time and in a way that is easy to pick out the trends and patterns. A stacked bar chart is in essence a pie chart stretched out linearly. I find that when you are comparing between more than two statuses that ...


1

If you want to avoid any confusion, what you really should do is to separate the two pieces of information that you are trying to show, which is A) Trend status and B) Goal status. Because the trend is relative to previous dataset(s) and the goal is absolute to a given number (at least that's what I would assume), it is easy to misinterpret the information ...


7

Since the issue is the relative position of the bar, you could try fixing the bar by keeping it in the middle. Something like this : It also has the advantage of representing the fact that the goal is fixed and not moving, while your performance is.


0

Many pie charts have a few wedges which add up to more than 99%, plus a few other values which make up the remaining 1%. A normal way to handle those is to have an "everything else" wedge whose width is artificially forced large enough to be visible (maybe 0.2% or so), and then have a call-out listing the contents of that wedge. Such an approach would seem ...


0

My favourite is Coggle.it. In there users can design complex graphs, add annotations, categorise with color and other things. Part of my notes for the Gamification course.


1

Nothing wrong with the good old decision tree diagrams: e.g. http://www.collegehumor.com/post/6883988/where-should-you-post-that-thing-you-want-to-share


1

A general comment (but one that doesn't fit well in the comment section with links etc before anyone gets on their high horse) is that inequality symbols >, <, >=, <= get introduced in maths syllabuses a lot earlier than interval notations so I'd expect more people to understand >TIE - 55 than (TIE -55] and >55 - 67 than (55 - 67] - I remember using >, ...


0

We've already established that the person who asked the question wants a pie chart, so the answer should be focused on how to represent the information and values in that chart (whether it should be used or not is another consideration altogether). So in addressing that point, you could look at two things: Adding labels where appropriate (this could be on ...


1

If you have a bar chart and one of the columns is empty you don't hide the column (and the consequently the connected label). The same should be true for the pie chart. However, interestingly Google charts does the opposite and actually hides it by default - see this jsfiddle of a pie chart where the percentage of time for eating is zero.


2

Taking continuity into acount I would go with something like this:


0

I would look into something like: Possibly color-coded and playing with blank spaces.


19

Don't use a pie chart Your problem stems from the fact you're using a pie chart. Pie charts are simply not a very good way of representing data (see here, here, here or here for some discussions of why) and you've stumbled on one of the reasons why: they can't represent data with a value of 0. They're also almost impossible to accurately read the values off ...


2

The answer here depends on how the charts are being used. If the charts are historically factual (the data that they represent is fixed and will not change over time), extra legend entries for zero values are just noise that gets in the way of the users understanding of the chart. However, if the charts are constantly changing, you need to signal to your ...


27

Yes, show it. The data IS important. Others gave given good reasons (the inclusion of Oranges clarifies they HAD been taken into account) and suggestions (show percentages or numbers, show a thin line if >0 but v. low). Here is a clearer example of why it would be a bad idea to not include zero-sized elements in the legend: Assume we have 0 apples, as ...


3

In a similar line to the nyt solution for a more complex diagram I would, for every answer, write a sentence( do you like green - yes - no // you like green) And when the user makes a choice put them on clickable cards on the top as you would breadcrumbs. This way you can have the question centered, allowing the user to focus on the choices being made, ...


0

I don't know what the content is, but after looking at all your options I think all you really need to do is to join the vertical lines together and it will solve your problem. You can keep your padding, but essentially it just won't have any styling around it.


1

Try to reduce any visual noise to eliminate the optical effects. White space is enough for separation. More simple design will draw an eye along the lines and will focus users on the content: For form you can also use more simple design: More separated lines:


2

I would suggest that if "0% oranges" is the main point of significance, then the pie chart is the wrong way to display the data. If, on the other hand, 0% oranges is no more significant than (say) 1% oranges, because you know your standard deviation is a fraction of a percent or larger, then I'd display a thin orange radius so readers don't think there's a ...


48

How about his. show the percentage in the legend: Apples (20%) Melons (80%) Oranges (0%)


78

Show the numbers. If the user selected three fruits to be shown, Apples, Oranges, and Melons, and only sees Apples and Melons in the pie and in the legend, they will wonder where the Oranges went. If the Oranges are shown in the legend but not in the pie, again they will look for the tiny slice of Orange with a magnifying glass. Therefore, show the ...


14

Definitely keep it in the legend. If you only have the two items in the legend it looks like you created a chart to show the comparison of Apples and Melons. For all the user knows there could be twice as many Oranges and you simply didn't include them in this data. Since Oranges are included you need to show that. A second reason would be if the user ...


-1

Mobile experiences are, almost by definition, brief and focused. The concept of a dashboard is a great one for this type of data, and your parallel to a fitness app here is actually quite a good one. I'd do some research on mobile fitness app card design and see if you find something that sparks some ideas. For my money, I'd go after something like the ...


0

I am thinking of a drag'n'drop interface where the users can physically match the shape and size of the 'chunks' of work/classes they need to complete in order to use the tool. If you are open to thinks like gamification then you can even incorporate those elements into the interaction design. Just to illustrate my design concept: download bmml source ...



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