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Why dont you do all of the above: Graph with details: or graph with sub-graphs: You can use a bar with color and relative size to its container to quickly show the items capacity. Under that you can show the percentages for people who need to know the specifics. When you click (or touch on mobile) a panel slides down giving details for each of its ...


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Using color alone as a differentiation may not work for some users (e.g. users color blindness). Consider using another visual difference e.g. height difference (example 1) or make the green brighter than the yellow and the red darker than it (example 2) or perhaps add HIGH/MED/LOW (example 3) if you don't want to specify percentage (even though I think ...


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The main reason is not UX related. The "displays" you are referring to in fact are not just displays. They cover a very broad variety of hardware ranging from simple PLCs with matrix LCD screens to full blown industrial PCs. The industry chooses for these options for a number of reasons, including: communication requirements with external systems ...


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Mostly because of costs, and the software/hardware platform the thing is running on. A lot of the displays you see on machines, parking meters or other electronics run on rather basic hardware and software where you sometimes only have a few kB of Storage to handle everything, and it's mostly programmed in C or some language that is very close to the ...


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I work for a large electronics manufacturer and the move to better displays for industrial equipment is happening, albeit slowly. As suggested above, it was often an engineer who was left to design the display too. This was usually of secondary importance to the function of the device itself. That's starting to change in our company where new products often ...


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Your two examples there are very different. One indicates it's using real-time data from a piece of hardware, the other indicates using static data. In my experience, the guy with enough knowledge of hardware (often very specialized hardware) just isn't a UI/UX/designer person. The skills to do that aren't required to accomplish the tasks he's looking to ...


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I recommend a heatmap for your case. It will be more conventional and much easier for users to read. What would also help with displaying a big dispersion of values like 12000-300 is logarithmic scale.


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Look at it a different way You're trying to accurately show the current quantity. Perhaps users don't need the accuracy? Maybe it's about encouraging the correct user behaviour as quantities change. Ask yourself: What user behaviours must change as a function of stock quantity? For any given item, there are probably several quantities, or thresholds, ...


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What you are trying to do is show the magnitude of flow or the transfer of flow within a system. In your case, search results Between A to Z, where the sub systems can be A to D, E to G, H to Q, Q to Z; and by using a funnel you can show with hierarchy how you got the 100% for A to Z from the sub systems. I'd argue you that this type of a visualization ...


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Why not use the Venn diagram. Easyish to grasp, a bit harder to ignore if big. Scalable if you include the result counts and if there isn't that many search terms. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Or if the search terms return results that have been already filtered out. download bmml source BONUS Using ...



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