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1

I realise that you've already done something else, but one other approach you could take is to retain the "arrows" metaphor, but turn them so the arrows go down the screen instead of across. Then you could retain the implied flow, but also have more width for the associated text. Excuse the hasty and hacky photoshop job (terrible text alignment, etc...), ...


2

I like the arrows solution more. The second jsfiddle link you posted has lost some of its flow because you switched from arrows to boxes. If you are worried about it looking good on mobile, simple create a break after the first 3 shapes. That way the first three (first notice of loss, assign/split, investigate/evaluate) are all on one row and the next three ...


1

There are a few fancy solutions here but, based on the data you presented, I think the best option is probably a Dual-Y Column Chart. Since the graduations for both Client Health and Call Quality are effectively the same ('Good', 'Fair', 'Poor', 'Unknown') you can easily represent both of these values on the Y axis without causing confusion with scales. ...


1

Bubble chart Put Client Health and Quality on the x and y axes. Each Call Type is represented by a bubble in the resulting coordinate system, i.e. a circle whose radius is relative to the total amount of such calls. You can add some labels or colors to indicate the “good” and “poor” areas of the sector. Instead of actual circles you could also scale icons ...


1

Have you considered splitting the information into several charts? The current chart looks sophisticated, which may show that you are clever and have great data analyzing skills. However, it may be hard to read by your intended audiences. The whole purpose for us to do the data analysis is for other people to understand the data, not to show that we can ...


1

As far as I understand, the main confusion occurs at the "Show all", so I would simply rename the label to "Show all of series 3 only" to make sure users understand this action clears out all other series. The timeframe cuts controls could be displayed on the right, with the horizontal highlight to show that it's a cut across all series. What does the "...


2

"Say I chose a checkbox from each of two different series, and then chose a "show all" checkbox from a third series. Would it be confusing to see my first two choices removed?" It would be very confusing if the first two choices were removed but still shown as 'checked' in their respective checkboxes as there would be a mismatch in state between the ...


0

Yes, it would be confusing and potentially annoying or even frustrating. You might want to rethink how the interact. Maybe you have the choose from all, date, or custom first. If they choose custom, they get the option groups. Generally speaking good form design is: if something is toggled, radio button. If choices and multiple selections, checkboxes, ...


1

This all boils down to what information an indicator needs to convey and how practical it is to make one that conveys it. In the old mechanical days, it was always more practical to make the dial-type for everything (clocks, voltmeters, speedometers etc.) In the digital world, it's more practical to make them solid-state numeric. Do we still need dials? In ...


3

Sounds like you want a stacked percentage chart. This can be either a bar chart, or a line-based one.


4

I think this is the only visualisation that meets your need for Case 1. Here you can clearly see a declining pattern: Your case 2 is more difficult to solve using this pattern because now you are looking to compare 4 things and the stacked bar approach does come with some challenges when it comes to comparing a trend over time. Consider this example - you ...



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