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My response probably isn't going to answer "THE common UI component" but I thought I might share how we will solve a similar problem in my project. We are designing a responsive search interface that has regular filters on the left hand side on large screens. On mobile all these filters will collapse into a bar below the search box. Please see my animated ...


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Very interesting question. Possibly, one of the most expressive way to represent budget figures that are linked between them was the Multi-Depth 3D Pie Chart. This kind of chart reveals instantly what one needs to understand: what are the lowest figures and the highest ones. Here is a possible visualization of the multi-depth chart : Maybe you could ...


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Since you only have 3 possible values in each row, there is no need to identify the middle one. Mark the high and low values with a simple symbol, such as red 'H' or a blue 'L', a plus and minus, or even full text, if you have the space. Make sure that the users can clearly differentiate between the values and your markings, maybe encapsulate them in some ...


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Maintain grid alignment For complex flows and hierarchies, grid alignment is crucial for calming the complexity and providing a sense of order to the user. If you get the grid layout correct, you can de-emphasize the arrows because the user really only has to look at the arrows once to understand how to navigate the flow (so you don't have to make them ...


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Why not have arrows that explicitly point the the next circle in the sequence even when it's on the next line: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups But, FWIW, I don't think a vertical array of things implies the top element is more important, just that it's first in the sequence. Circles and arrows could be used to ...


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I use a simple example to show how visual design can impact user experience, particularly usability. The science behind it has to do with how you are driving the end-user's eye down the page. One of the best things you can do with sites or applications that display large amounts of data is to use Gestalt Principles to create groups of data. Done properly, ...


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From the Norman study: ... post-use perceptions of both aesthetics and usability Be wary of subjective assessments. They have a place, but always try to get some objective data too (speed, accuracy etc).


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ASSUMPTION: the users of this application are expert users (meaning that they frequently use the app as part of their job). My first thought would be to present the icon as you're currently doing and making that icon clickable or, depending upon the amount of information, reveal a tool tip which allows users to see more detailed information. ASSUMPTION: ...


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What's "usability"? If you are measuring productivity, you're going to have a hard time beating extremely basic, low-information, high-performance UI. Examples: "greenscreen" mainframe systems and craigslist. If you are measuring user satisfaction or engagement metrics, probably the opposite. So if you want your users to get a lot done with less chance of ...


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I pointed this out in a comment, but there is an element of “answer” to it as well … Fuzzy logic Studies on how “visual” design effects user experience are hard to nail down. Even Don Norman’s great writing on the subject has an element of mystery or art. You won’t find anything that says, “This was ...


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I agree with most of the points that have been made so far, so I'll just add one that hasn't been touched on yet. One of the things often overlooked about visual design is the impact that it has on the user's trust. If you've ever gone to a small-business website that has been constructed using one of the many. template-based, cheap, hosting websites, ...


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Yes, visual design affects user experience Here's a common meal with only one visual difference. It's enough to drive a dramatically different user experience: There is more formal literature on this topic, but since others have already provided citations, I will add one more a simple illustration. The following two forms are almost identical except for ...


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There were scientific studies in aviation, that show, that visual aesthetics of control dashboards in plane's cockpit affects effectiveness of flight operations. So visually appealing design affects usability. But what was interesting, that when the system was too beautiful for operators, they perceived it as too intelligent and ideal, so the effectiveness ...


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You could start by reading interaction-design.org's entry, by Noam Tractinsky, on visual aesthetics. Remember also to read Jeffrey Bardzell's comments on the entry. Then you could check out Tractinsky's seminal What is beautiful is usable: A multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that the degree of system's aesthetics affected the post-use ...


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Don Norman's "Why we Love (or Hate) Everyday Things" opens with an account of a famous study on this, conducted by N. Tractinsky in 1999. He tested four different designs of an ATM machine, where each could have either good or bad usability, and good or bad aesthetics (a 2x2 research design). He reported that the degree of system's aesthetics affected ...


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Only can answer on point 2): After 5 years of mobile UI design I can tell you function > design. Small screens ask detailed information where less is more. Colors however (visual design) can optimize the UX. One of my projects was an mobile app for farmers (they never used a smartphone before). With the right colors (red for cancel / green for ok etc) ...


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User gets either comfortable or otherwise in a very short time frame - how user perceives is very important. Also, User forms an opinion based on previous experiences (that's one reason why part of the design has to follow history) and when mixed right triggers placed at right points (that's where eye trackers help a bit) aids user experience. So, yes, ...



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