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This is a technical option, but if you have the means it's worth investigating: Define a similarity metric between answers. You can use simple metrics, like cosine similarity (ie. basic word frequencies), or go more complex. You can enrich the metric by using synonym dictionaries, tf-idf, and edit distance techniques. Apply a clustering algorithm ...


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Word clouds are completely useless. Two patterns here (making a bunch of assumptions about your needs) might be: Perform semantic analysis on the answers to strip away filler words (and possibly group together phrases), and then display words by frequency in a simple bar chart. Bar charts are one of the easiest-to-understand visualizations of categorical ...


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Another alternative - one that gets rid of the discontinuity at midnight (or 10am) - would be a spiral visualization, with one day per circuit. Here's a picture of a spiral visualisation from an earlier UX answer of mine: You could use 24 hours per circuit, and show history over 7 or 10 days easily. The same time of day always shows at the same angle, ...


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I agree with Charles; the same chart but with the axes reversed makes more sense to me. I tend to think of time in terms of timelines, which your chart just isn't doing for me right now. I also think you want some way to indicate continuities within broken time chunks, so it's clear that the kid didn't wake up briefly at midnight. download bmml source ...


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Humans are very bad at judging difficulty and complexity, and almost as bad at communicating difficulty in any standard unit. How much easier is a task with a difficulty of 5 than one with a difficulty of 6? Is it really the same amount of difference as a task that has a difficulty of 1? The solutions to this problem vary, but they tend to do one of two ...


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It depends on the importance of the complexity indicator. How useful is it for the user? Looking at your graph i see that you have a lot of variation in your complexity rating: 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2.5, 3. One way i see it is as a green to red bar: You can incorporate more colors in it (like orange) or do it as a scale (like Alexei suggested). This would allow ...


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I'd recommend: to have limited number of complexity levels. Because having a lot of those create cognitive barrier. As complexity is not absolute category, people will interpret it subjectively and think a lot before making decision. It's better to use 3 or 4 levels to name levels in appropriate way. Labels allow to refer to levels in clear way and to ...


2

You should just use some descriptive words like "Simple," "Intermediate," and "Complex." A number of stars is just that: A number. And if you use a number, than you have to explain the unit of measurement. Why do that when natural language offers words specifically meant for this situation? For the best implementation, I would give each word a tooltip that ...


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Alternative to alexeypegov suggestion is having a vertical list. Again, if you are showing less than 15 elements vertical list works. However, if the design had elements Scipion examples. You could pull off an amazing list comparator. What is the main goal for the user having to view the list comparator?


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Since you have two lists and there is no information on which one is primary, I think that diff like this will work good: Pros: It shows both lists unmodified It shows resulting list It highlights items which are added It shows common part of the lists Cons: Three lists instead of one Colors could be tuned up to your needs (for example, you may ...


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The classical way is a Venn diagram: (Source: Wikipedia) For quantification of set similarity/dissimilarity, you can look at Sørensen–Dice coefficient or Jaccard index. Their parameterization is the Tversky index.


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What you describe seems a diff-like application. You could use a similar view, two columns and the matching items hightlighted. As for the similarity algorithm, if ListA is {A} and ListB is {A,B} lists would be 50% similar, then it could be: coincidences / (ListA length + ListB length + conincidences) * 100


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Well, the "best" way will depend on your needs and the overall style of the dashboard (what are users used to see - are there more similar visualizations?), but generally speaking, you can: Flip the semantics, i.e. worse rankings will result in a smaller slice. Simply use a meter bar instead of a donut.


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You need to be delicate to solve this matter. Basically what you are trying to do is to tell the users that particular content is not available at the moment due to connectivity problems, but it might become available in the future. At the same time you don't want to distract them with spinners or changing messages so they could focus on the content/videos ...


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Having multiple progress bars is probably quite annoying and too detailed. Using spinners is more easily digestible on a Pinterest-like video wall but could be annoying as well. The ideal solution might be to only display to the user content that is playable immediately. Users will be happier if they first expect/see a small amount of content, then are ...


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Well, I was struggling with this problem. I don't recommend to use log scale, first not all users will understand this scale, second one, if you have values that are close the difference between them won't be noticeable on the graph. I recommend two solutions: break graphs: but we need to remember to change the scale, scale must be adjusted not to the ...


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You're focusing heavily on the word "accuracy", but you're discussing the topic of skills. In an educational setting, the word "proficiency" better represents the goals of teaching, and teachers often measure proficiency by reporting the students' accuracy on tests. I would try to use the more appropriate word, as it will help reduce confusion. Also, ...


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Why not order skills by accuracy? Order shows the pattern.


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From what I can tell, there isn't much context to the percentages that are presented. What are they percentages of? For example: "Skills to be improved - Subtract within 20: 30%". 30% what? If it's supposed to be Accuracy, it's not called out or made apparent anywhere. You could call it out or simplify the concept a bit.


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Why not try visually showing their progress? Also, the color of the bars can change as the progress changes, RED= 10-35% Orange=36-70% Green=70%-100%.


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Do you absolutely need to emphasise that the variable is continuous? I'd suggest displaying version two as a stacked column graph if you can get away with it. Humans are much better at comparing area changes in one dimension rather than two at the same time. You might be able to overlay a line graph over the stacked column graph to get the effect you ...


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For user trends, the stacked graph seems to be appropriate, because your different data share the same unit, and the sum of the values is a meaningful value (total number of users). It makes it slightly easier to express both changes in percentage and total number, although at the cost of direct comparison. However, some quesitons remain - see my comment.



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