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You could add a word cloud with tags like 'photoshop', 'indesign', 'html' and have them scaled based on how many projects of you use that technique, how many years you've used it. This way you highlight your strong suits in an intuitive and relative (no absolute numbers or percentages) fashion. The point is not to accurately grade yourself on how good you ...


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I'm not sure if it applies to your case since I don't know what are your axises measuring, but I'd use something like a bullet graph designed by Stephen Few for cases that seems to cover yours, see below: Overview The bullet graph was developed to replace the meters and gauges that are often used on dashboards. Its linear and no - frills design ...


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Iterate and test JeromeR is right on track with the general approach. Experiment with possible data sets and ways to visualize them, then ask yourself and others what best tells the story. Just like anything else in our business, user testing is key. There's one other important point that shouldn't be missed ... Visualizations should expand understanding ...


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Your question is about information design. First, if this topic interests you greatly, I recommend you find The visual display of quantitative information by Tufte. His books are beautifully illustrated but expensive—so check your local library first or get your employer to buy you this book. Tufte will get you thinking about the design of charts and graphs ...


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Something I do which I believe is more relevant, is instead of using ambiguous percentages I use years, relative to my career. I still use a sort of 'bar graph', but the numbers have context in relation to the length of time I've been working: The numbers across the top are the years of my career (2000 - 2015) and each skill is represented as a ...


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Give the user some sense of control Here are some UX ideas that give the sense of control to the user (as opposed to "full automation"): break down the tasks by categories, so that the user sends emails in batches by type; as each series of emails is triggered, suggest to open a preview of the corresponding list (a simple, long, cleanly-formatted list ...


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To me a sunburst, hiveplot or a sankey diagram seem better options, depending on the context of the data. Hiveplot shows all data layers without the liability of pie-chart-like design that makes all four categories look like 25% each. Sunburst is great for displaying breakdowns of each part, and this can be priceless in displaying sub-flows. ...


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Possibility: Pick a timezone by default (e.g., UTC) and then have a way for the user to choose a different timezone to use. (Or, ask the user for the timezone first, or have that timezone as a preference in their user settings that they can change.)


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Plotting data with non-local timezones was a problem in one of the projects I engineer'ed at. Soon after the product's launch, we noticed a problem when we viewed data about buildings in New York from computers in California that had never surfaced in our automated testing or manual QA efforts: all of our charts for New York buildings displayed times on ...


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It really depends on what is the typical analysis to be performed with the data. If the analysis is local either (e.g. trends in one sensor's measurements over time), or time-agnostic (e.g. comparison of mean values from different sensors) you should stick with local time associated with the recording event, which is the least confusing for the user. Like ...


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You try your best in displaying the times in the time zones users are expecting to see the data in. For most scientific datasets, the viewer is trying to understand patterns from the data of a particular region. In this case, the viewer's time zone is irrelevant. Display data using time zone of the region where it's captured. To use an extreme example, ...


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Your sketch makes sense and its one of the many ways to solve the puzzle. And believe it or not, its as simple as it gets. It is possible with D3.js; if you look deeper into timeseries type of visualizations you might find an open source code or modules that would help you build it. Here's some resources for you to get started For your step line graph ...


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Data visualisation is statistics with a pretty face (statistics is mathematics) and fundamentally this is how we've always measured anything, Label. Value. Unit. Speed, 115km/h Force of 48N Gravity is 9.8m/s and in your case, Contacts Left, 6689 Humans or Contacts Left, 6689 Androids or Contacts Left, 6689 Aliens Without a Label, a user would no idea ...


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It depends on the frequency of use and the context. Is the user going to see this on a daily basis in a dedicated setting, or a couple times a year in the context of a larger report? As grmmph already said, having the label on top makes it easier to parse what the number is, so it's more helpful for first time users. However, if users will be seeing this ...


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I recommend using a combination of the first two images, especially the second. Essentially it is a 1D heat map. It's pretty easy to create one using HTML, CSS, and JS: <!-- HTML --> <div class="bar"></div> /* CSS */ .bar { height:30px; border:1px darkgray solid; width:500px; position:relative; overflow:hidden; } ...


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A progress bar kind of risk estimation can be used in this case so that the user can be provided with the percentage of risk in a visual form. More details can be provided to the user once they click the percentage displayed above the progress bar.


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I would go ahead and assume this donut chart wouldn't be the only one displayed, but will be part of a row(s) full of charts and visual graphs. In this case, I would absolutely organize the text in a readable data structure - Label top, Data bottom. When visualizing data as such, it is better practice to first give them the key for the data(which normally ...


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I can agree with all the information that is given on not using the gauges. But there's one user related question: Does the user know what the minimum and maximum risk number is? Is it a percentage and does everyone know if 50% is acceptable? If they don't know, the colours and even the gauge might be a good addition to make sure everyone knows what the ...


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There is a commonly held belief that static speedometer-style gauges are bad for getting a concept across easily or efficiently on a screen based business dashboard. This seems to have to do with the data to ink ratio and the ease with which people compare angles vs length of parallel lines. e.g. refs: Not Gauges Again! and If gauge charts are bad, why do ...


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Besides being visually pleasing and interesting, the speedometer-style graphic also adds a third dimension (space, i.e. the length of the arc), in which the information is encoded. (The first two dimensions being: the numeric digit(s), and the color.)


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I wouldn't bother showing anything until they have performed some sort of search. it may be possible to grab just the dealer names or some other useful bit of information from the database without taking the whole lot. This would allow an 'autocomplete' type function but wouldn't have the weight (and wait) of the full database download. Then you only need to ...


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I definitely do not recommend B. As Ville Niemi states, you should always only show the useful bits. Besides, Facebook's only showing the placeholders when it's loading content (which should take about 1-2 seconds). Browsing What I, as a web developer/designer, do is show a fixed number of entries first, 5 to 10, and use a button to trigger the ...


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Neither the random nor fake preview seems useful. Content that is not useful should not be developed. It is waste of resources for both developer and user. Development time spent on low value work is not available for high value work. Effort users spend parsing and comprehending low value content is not available for actual work. Instead you should go back ...


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But you can have both. You don't have to return 200,000+ rows to have a count. SQL has a count function. select count(*) from table where .... select top 50 * from table where ... That is 51 rows with a count. Give them a page count and total count Give them details and a summary Page 1 Result 1-50 of 222,147 And then prior page and next ...


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Here you have some ideas playing with shapes, tints, high/low conventions, dirty/clean metaphors. Of course it will be easier if your metrics are numeric instead of conceptual. You could also place labels below/above, you could use grids to support the metaphor and so on, basically showing some wireframes in the hope they are of help for you


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You can't use different colors, so you'll have to use shapes. You know how some rating websites use $ = inexpensive and $$$ = expensive? What if you did something similar. Print just the outlines of + and -, and fill them in based on whether low, medium, or high correlation. I think it'd also be helpful to print the spelled-out results in a light, thin ...



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