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I assume that all languages can qualify a better and a worse half, most should also be able to state that something or someone is neither really good nor really bad, but mediocre. Many languages, like English, also have separate lexemes for good and bad or top and bottom (cf. Latin altus which means either ‘high’, e.g. a mountain, or ‘low’, e.g. a valley) ...


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In SAT terms, a person's percentile rank is the percentage of students who score lower on the SAT. To the extent your audience is familiar with the usage of the word percentile from experience with the SAT, that is a reasonable working definition. I agree with Alexey Kolchenko that academic terminology like percentile is potentially confusing. You might try ...


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I did a Google search for 'cognitive retention of infographics' and, by following the link to 'Scholarly Articles', found that the top three articles relate to your question. Of the two studies that I had access to, the first stated in its abstract that there is no difference in learning between those using infographics and those using graphics + text, ...


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Well the answer lies in cognitive psychology and how the brain is structured. Its much harder for the brain to read because alphabet is just recently introduced, in evolution terms, and we are still not adapted to read fast. For example, its much easier to see a bar chart and comprehend which value is the highest, compared to reading a whole paragraph. 20% ...


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I consider this a loaded question because the extent to which infographics (and data visualizations) can be useful depends on how well they are conceived and executed. So your question about evidence for: how successful infographics are at getting the viewer of the graphic to think about the data presented --> if done well (e.g. NYT, Guardian, Economist) ...


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Don't show all the relationships, just list the information that the user asks for if the tasks are that simple i.e. the classes Anna is in, or all the students in Chemistry 101. They can select these initial choices through a pair of lists / indented lists. On the occasion the user wants to see extra relations you can incrementally build a much simpler ...


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Inspired by scottishwildcat's answer. Just put checkmarks and use a different style for completed items: Alternatively, if you wish to show the progress of subtasks as well: I've also made the outstanding classes as links with mouse hover popups as users may wish to know more about the classes they need to meet the criteria.


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Since this is purely for information and not interactive, could you keep it simple by ignoring what they have completed, and focus on what they haven't? Something like: You are not eligible to use this tool until you have completed all of the following: Shop Basics Safety Training Any one of Intro to Woodworking, Woodworking: Build a box, ...



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