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57

Designers When it's your working version and you just want some text in there to visualise the overall page balance, and you'll only share it with other designers, then using Lorum ipsum should probably be fine. End users For end users, I would suggest using some other real example text. Yes, you'd have to localise this, but it's quite easy to simply ...


43

I have seen the following visualization used to represent down time and it has been effective: The illustration in the question requires too much thinking. The linear time line works well for a 24 hour timespan.


30

Font and layout is exactly what Lorem Ipsum is designed to do. It has been used by type setters and printers since the 1500s. The idea is that by not having real words the users focus on the layout. It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is ...


12

If the goal is to provide a short text sample for the style then use a pangram like "A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog". This will show how each letter is rendered.


12

Generally it's not a great idea to present 'dense' 3D data. But let's say this really needs to be done. In this case the dimensions you're trying to present are: Skillset (30+ categories) x Competence (4 categories including none) x Capacity (TBD). The skillset category makes the data dense. So with respect to the other answerer, a spider chart will ...


10

While it can be computationaly and mathematically complex, the concept of heat maps can help you out here. The point of a heat map is you add a third dimension to a 2 dimensional plot not by actually having an additional axis, but by using color. For example, your X axis could be "employees", your Y axis could be "project", and time could be represented by ...


10

Consider the following: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Bullet graphs provide a condense and clear way of comparing data when you have a list of skills where you need to compare between "target" and "actual". The 100% line makes it very easy to tell whether you have enough resources or not. There's also no need ...


9

An aside: COTS stands for Commercial Off The Shelf. Per the chart - it tells me nothing. Both the X and Y axis are so deep I have to following an enormous gulf in order to guess that the server was down roughly in the timeframe of 20:24-20:28. Why are there 4 lines in-between the hour lines when they only jump by 2 hours? My eye also has to wander a great ...


9

This is the way Pingdom chose to visualize it in their Public Status Pages: (Disclosure: I was the front-end web developer who implemented this graph back in 2010, but not the designer or originator of the concept.)


8

UptimeRobot is a tool for monitoring server downtimes (I'm just a user, no other connection whatsoever). They're showing a small graph on the left side for the up-/downtimes for every watched server in the last 24 hours (I edited the image because none of my watched servers had a downtime in this period). If you click on one of the bars, you see details on ...


7

If the text preferences are important, you should not use example text in a different (which includes fictive) language. Languages have different characteristics, and what looks fine for a paragraph of "Lorem ipsum …" is not necessarily ideal for text in other languages. So you should show text in the language the user is setting the preferences for. You ...


7

Choose a text generator that suits your domain and use it instead. Lorem ain't good for layout/typography, it was never meant to (see other answers for why it's not, unless you are in a real printing business, Gutenberg&co-style). If you're after font/typography, use a pangram for the language you are after (hello localization!), like @ratchetfreak said ...


7

Tackling the competency and capacity in a single visualization may be a tall order, but I think a spider/radar graph is a good, tested solution for visualizing competency. http://www.one45.com/wordpress/assets/Best-practices-competency-spider-graphs-radar-plots.pdf As the above link mentions, this representation is best for quickly communicating skill ...


5

I'd recommend: to have limited number of complexity levels. Because having a lot of those create cognitive barrier. As complexity is not absolute category, people will interpret it subjectively and think a lot before making decision. It's better to use 3 or 4 levels to name levels in appropriate way. Labels allow to refer to levels in clear way and to ...


5

Here is a good example - even though you stated that "Pay What You Want" will not fit. There are several good aspects of this that you may apply to your UI. (from losttype.com) They equate Pay-What-You-Want with a Personal License in the description. This may or may not apply to your situation, but it allows you to describe it in one place, and keep the ...


5

Here is another option that might work depending on the situation. It has the added benefit of not needing to be localized into different languages... credit: Facebook placeholder loading card


4

This one tested well with both the technical and non-technical users and can generate pretty much any possible database query... The benefits are that it's very clear and a user can drag and drop (or delete) any expression or group of expressions in the tree. The down side is how much space it consumes.


4

I agree with Charles; the same chart but with the axes reversed makes more sense to me. I tend to think of time in terms of timelines, which your chart just isn't doing for me right now. I also think you want some way to indicate continuities within broken time chunks, so it's clear that the kid didn't wake up briefly at midnight. download bmml source ...


3

"Set price" or "Price" should work. More importantly, I think you can convey the fact that pay what you want by showing an input field instead of a price. That way, users wouldn't even have to read the tag to understand that it's up to them to determine the price. This would work especially well in places where users have already been "trained" to expect a ...


3

Another alternative - one that gets rid of the discontinuity at midnight (or 10am) - would be a spiral visualization, with one day per circuit. Here's a picture of a spiral visualisation from an earlier UX answer of mine: You could use 24 hours per circuit, and show history over 7 or 10 days easily. The same time of day always shows at the same angle, ...


3

Since you have two lists and there is no information on which one is primary, I think that diff like this will work good: Pros: It shows both lists unmodified It shows resulting list It highlights items which are added It shows common part of the lists Cons: Three lists instead of one Colors could be tuned up to your needs (for example, you may ...


3

You can use a thick line for each element. Have a tooltip for each line, to show what each line represents. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

Original Candlesticks are black and white. Black for down days (Bears are in control) and White or hollow for up days (Bulls are in control). These days people use colours to make them easier to read. The colours can be based on "open vs close" or "net change". Open vs Close is original candlesticks with color (usually red and green). The chart can also be ...


3

A recent (2013) paper from the information visualization community looked at a related problem, namely: "What makes a visualization memorable?" They reasoned that: "knowing what makes a visualization memorable is a step towards answering higher level questions like "What makes a visualization engaging?" or "What makes a visualization effective?" ...


3

In my experience, Lorem Ipsum is beloved of typography fans, and unknown to the common man - aka, the client. So, if you want to avoid a discussion with the client about why the text is garbled, and why you selected this placeholder text rather than some text saying "this is placeholder text" and then properly exercising as many code points and ligatures as ...


3

Why waste the opportunity to promote your clients, company, or products? I realize you're trying to give them something without meaning so they won't focus on the words, but if you give them the same positive words about your product every time, they will read the message once then quickly overlook it from that point forward. "You are a balanced and wise ...


3

While »Lorem Ipsum« is great for the early design stage it is nearly always worth to change the blind text to localized dummy text (Yes, this is additional work which seems not necessarily needed. But it shows you're paying attention to details.) The trick is to use text which looks like a normal reading text – this is very important! While most people ...


3

Cynthia Brewer has done a great deal of work in color arrangements, namely for cartography, which can take color blindness into consideration. She has a website which allows you to select from several parameters, including color blindness, to create a limited set of colors for multiple situations: ColorBrewer. The color selection is put in the context of ...


2

For general advice on how not to design misleading graphs, have a look at this Wikipedia page that covers a broad spectrum of scenarios. You may also be interested in the book "How to lie with statistics" -- originally published in 1954, it is very popular and still in print. Because I don't know what your exact use-case is, I'll rely on a contrived example ...



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