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I tried to design an alternative to sliders for your question. It is intended to visualize data with less clutter and better readability. It isn't much different from sliders, but features: more white space rows differentiated by colors (as offered by @Monomeeth) indicated standard and selected values more details provided when parameter is selected ...


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Agreed, adding more complicated charts may provide more information but may not necessarily make the app more useful. Here is a good example from Cole Nussbaumer's Storytelling with Data book. I made the interactive version using ZingChart, since that's the charting library I'm most familiar with. http://demos.zingchart.com/view/embed/FUUTOL1M Even ...


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It sounds like you actually like the slider approach generally, so I'd suggest keeping that and finding a way to minimise your concerns. I'd probably use some background shading to help differentiate your sliders so that the risk of error to your users is minimised. Below is an example of what I mean: Obviously you will have to choose your colours and ...


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It doesn't matter where the cutoff is. 55.0000000000000000000000001 is still over 55. As for how to count 45-55 vs 55-65; you generally start counting at whole integers. We tend to start (things of unknown length) however it's easy, because we can't yet know where the end is, so you can't adjust for the unknown end. This influences our thinking so that we ...


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Totally see your point in the second instance, but in the first, isn't the problem, as you stated it, endlessly recursive? [0-.999],[1-1.999]. "Ah, but what if I have a value of 0.9992?" Ok, [0-.9999],[1-1.9999]. "Ah, but what if I have a value of 0.99923?" : / You have to draw a line somewhere. Where exactly you draw that line and how ...



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