Hot answers tagged

9

My suggestion is about UX, rather than on UI and visualization. Your job is to solve a problem, not make a picture. This is from the Three charts are all I need, as well as the following quote: You can spend days, weeks, or even months working on visualizations of data, but does that benefit the business most? In most cases, a simple visualization will ...


4

I don't think that Tufte hates Venn diagrams, and the reason that he is not in favour of pie charts doesn't fully apply to Venn diagrams. I think as a visual tool Venn diagrams are not intended to be quantitative, much in the same way that if you use pie charts as a qualitative visual representation in specific scenarios it can be quite useful and even more ...


3

I recently designed a calendar which may give you some ideas so I thought I'd share a demo link... Calendar of Events 1. It conveys quite a bit of information and still works on mobile 2. It expands vertically when a day is clicked showing additional event details 3. It could potentially support more than 4 event types


3

I tried to design an alternative to sliders for your question. It is intended to visualize data with less clutter and better readability. It isn't much different from sliders, but features: more white space rows differentiated by colors (as offered by @Monomeeth) indicated standard and selected values more details provided when parameter is selected ...


2

Agreed, adding more complicated charts may provide more information but may not necessarily make the app more useful. Here is a good example from Cole Nussbaumer's Storytelling with Data book. I made the interactive version using ZingChart, since that's the charting library I'm most familiar with. http://demos.zingchart.com/view/embed/FUUTOL1M Even ...


2

As opposed to re-using pivot tables as I previously answered, this is an experimental UI that I thought of to handle the repetitive need for writing AND or OR. It relies on one element you must learn that ANDs are horizontal and ORs are vertical. It manages to deal with fairly complex Boolean logic though. Overview Assume that A, B, C, D, and E are ...


2

For creating relatively complex single table queries, pivot tables are very useful. Good stuff You can get SUM, AVG and GROUP with relatively little knowledge. By splitting fields across columns vs rows you get AND queries The totals give you OR queries You can properly 'build' queries - i.e. you can quickly see a master set, then add rows / columns and ...


2

There's quite a few good ideas/references here, especially to some existing approaches. Often, though not always, Apple's approach is a good place to start - but perhaps in your case it may not be. I get the impression (though you haven't actually said it) that you're working with an awful lot of data comprised of many many fields/variables. I agree that ...


2

I've taken your two important statements about what the user is most likely to do and put them in a simple dashboard: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If these are the 2 most important things, I think it's important to seperate them from the cluster of other data that is available (progressive disclosure). The ...


2

Showing just the day and the next-soonest event. This is just showing 8 datapoints, which could be shown with 4 relatively small elements: Showing each day/event This is going to be tricky to compress. It's 12, almost 50 datapoints. More if you insist on listing dates. What you have is already pretty small and close to the smallest legible solution. It ...


2

It sounds like you actually like the slider approach generally, so I'd suggest keeping that and finding a way to minimise your concerns. I'd probably use some background shading to help differentiate your sliders so that the risk of error to your users is minimised. Below is an example of what I mean: Obviously you will have to choose your colours and ...


1

It doesn't matter where the cutoff is. 55.0000000000000000000000001 is still over 55. As for how to count 45-55 vs 55-65; you generally start counting at whole integers. We tend to start (things of unknown length) however it's easy, because we can't yet know where the end is, so you can't adjust for the unknown end. This influences our thinking so that we ...


1

Totally see your point in the second instance, but in the first, isn't the problem, as you stated it, endlessly recursive? [0-.999],[1-1.999]. "Ah, but what if I have a value of 0.9992?" Ok, [0-.9999],[1-1.9999]. "Ah, but what if I have a value of 0.99923?" : / You have to draw a line somewhere. Where exactly you draw that line and how ...


1

If you are using d3.js,then you can probably create a matrix layout and plot your subject on one of its axis and let the other axis represent its objects,create color codes for each cell that would tell you about the various states of each object associated with the same object.After plotting it would look something similar : Based on color codes you can ...


1

I'll summarize what I think has been a very productive set of discussions and answers, and it will hopefully help you come up with an appropriate solution for your problem: Context: consider exactly how someone is going to use the information and perhaps also on what kind of device, because this will give you important design constraints that you'll be ...


1

My suggestion now below. Group and project hierarchy on the left, group names bolded to show difference between group and project. From the group row you can see which group attributes exist for the group. From the project row you can see and maake activate/inactive the attributes for each project. Borders added around group attributes to show the ...


1

To quickly answer your question, I think this is an Occam's Razor scenario, where the correct solution is usually the simplest one. Instead of creating complicated usability layouts and absolute positioning, simply provide a position relative to a known point in space, like the front door, checkout counters, whatever. See mockup below: This way, just a ...


1

I think some of the confusion may arise out of the fact that, as it is currently designed, each "shelf" is represented as a single unit. In the view above, the entire "shelf" is active, though one side is actually inaccessible to the user in their current location. Perhaps if you somehow divided each shelf into two parts, and only showed the part facing the ...


1

It is hard to pin down exactly what is intuitive for something that has traditionally been dealt with by technical users (that won't necessarily find interfaces more user-friend compared to command prompts). There is a particular reason for this efficiency, as queries can be unambiguously specified and executed in a command-line prompt. Also, it probably ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible