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74

Etsy spent quite some time developing and testing infinite scroll in their search listings. They noticed fewer clicks on results and fewer items favourited from the infinite results page, and users stopped using the search interface to find products. They reverted back to traditional pagination. There's a good article about it here: ...


31

[ Load More ] is certainly more "friendly" than a set of pagination links, but there is no indication of how much more data there is that could be viewed, unless you add something else that gives that information - assuming it's available. If you don't know the total number of matches (thanks @Erics) then [ Load More ] is ideal. If you know the total ...


27

Booking.com experimented with it, conversion dropped immensely. Everything they do there is A/B-tested. I wish I could share statistics, but those are documented internally so you'll just have to take this anecdotal evidence for what it is: something a guy on the internet posted. That said, the reason no large e-commerce websites use it means that it ...


18

I have the same opinion as you: I am not fond of infinite scroll. Tough, with time, this might change. In his blog post The End of Pagination, Jeff Atwood makes the point that Above all else, you should strive to make pagination irrelevant because the user never has to look at more than a few items to find what they need This satement does not quite holds ...


13

The simplest way would be to let the user know that new content is available. These can be found in many different applications that dynamically load new content. For example say, the user has scrolled down a couple of times in an application with infinite scroll you can do something like this, For paginated applications, consider not updating content in ...


8

Yes, that is a very good idea. There are a number of sites that I have used that don't do this, and the result can be very frustrating. Lets say that I have spent time looking at many items and I am many items below the search / filter component. If I want to double check what it is, I have to lose my place and spend time scrolling up first. Poor ...


7

You are right, it's a natural thing to scroll down when you see a list with an arbitrary number of items. If 6 is not arbitrary, then make sure your users are not expecting more or less. On the other hand, there is no harm in scrolling up or down, the user quickly discovers that the entire list is on the screen and gets used to it. You can help that by ...


6

I think the forum software discourse has a good solution for this. They are updating the url while you are scrolling down. If you goto to another page from the list and return using the back button, you are at the same position you have left the page. Try it yourself: http://try.discourse.org/ This blog article has more details of the reasoning behind ...


6

Most of the people scroll-down because of a huge amount of websites and apps that are using it more and more. I would use some typography and i would add on some distance from the bottom. Maybe something like a footer. but i still think the average user is used to scroll "by default"


6

Visual cues can suggest there aren't more elements and that the complete "page" is visible and can't be scrolled. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The inner rectangle groups the 6 items, suggesting a singular group, a panel that fills the viewport. The space above the top item and below bottom item show that there ...


5

Advert impressions don't have to be based on page views. They can be time based, where the advert is changed every 30 seconds or something like that. That way you can use infinite scrolling and still have the advertising revenue that you want. This is how it usually works on mobile advertising where there is a banner that doesn't necessarily change ...


5

Permalinks I would recommend creating a "static" version of each entry (i.e., a separate page with an absolute URL that someone can type in an address bar, thereby also enabling that URL to be shared as needed). It could just be as simple as loading exactly the same content (in the same layout and style) as what you're already loading in the preview thing ...


4

I think of it this way: If you want for users to see more and more pages non-stop you should use auto-pagination (not just appending at the end of the content after manual clicking). You can set threshold of showed pages, limit to unviewed results or give user corresponding setting for this mode to prevent informational overload on their side. Don't use ...


4

It depends on how people will be interacting with your website. If they need to come back or bookmark images then infinite scroll is probably the wrong solution. ETSY has a great blog post on why infinite scroll didn't work for them. If I know I want image 300 out of 1000 then infinite scroll becomes annoying. However, with pagination I can easily jump to ...


4

The general rule is that if you can achieve the same result with less user interaction, you should do it. Infinite scroll is one of the clearest ways of handling this. When someone has scrolled to the bottom (or near the bottom) of the screen, it's a fair bet that their next action would be to load more or go to the next page. So is you load more ...


4

Questions I aks myself when choosing the right pagination solution: Will users be addressing a particular page? If no - then don't do numbers, just prev/next or infinite scroll. How often items will be published to the feed. If often, then if I give page number to somebody it will become not correct in an hour - he/she will not found the item on that page. ...


3

Unless there are performance issues, let the user chose between pagination, infinite scroll, filtering and sorting of content. One way to think of it is letting the server decide what to deliver depending on load. At high traffic only 10 items will be delivered on each request delivered by Pagination/infinite scroll and allow for filtering. It would be sort ...


3

Infinite scrolling is generally bad for eCommerce sites because it doesn't allow users to bookmark pages or save where they left off if they leave and come back. Basically, if the user leaves the site, they lose their progress and it's hard for customers to know if they are getting the best product because they don't know for sure whether they've seen all ...


3

I recommend looking at this question Regular pagination vs. infinite scroll for additional inputs on what would be a good practice on when to use what. With regards to whether you should go for pagination or infinite scroll, that will depend on the type of content you have in your application.To quote the article Should you use infinite scroll instead of ...


3

Either way the results will be delivered via ajax without page reload. One thing to consider is that a user may be inclined to user their back button if you go the pagination route. Something like "Hey, I should go look at that person on page 2 again..." If the results are added via ajax the browsers back button isn't automatically going to take them to ...


3

Since the infinitely scrollable page has no real world parallel, perhaps the function of the back button can exist without a real world metaphor. Imagine that you have been scrolling down an infinite page, pausing for some parts and zipping past others. Now imagine that you tap the back button. What is your intention? too jump back up to the most ...


3

Follow like what FB does, whenever there is new entries in the timeline, display a small indicator (button) that shows up saying "New Stories", when pressed it will take the user to the top of the page. Yes, in terms of continuity, the old entries still should be displayed below the new entries. This way, user will still have an image map in his/her mind. ...


3

Instead of displaying a "load more" button, you can easily just put a phrase that says something like "end" such as: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Obviously, wording can change, but as long as they know that there is nothing more to show. Heck, even not displaying a button anymore can be sufficient enough.


2

One thing I don't think many people think about with infinite scroll is it essentially makes any UI elements you have in the footer area unreachable. If you have a fat footer with useful links across many/all pages of your site, an infinite scroll will create a jarring experience. The user scrolls to the bottom, sees the footer for a second or two, and ...


2

There are a lot of companies using infinite-scroll, I'm talking about data-driven companies that are fighting for user engagement (Facebook, Twitter, Tubmlr, etc), although most of the media/publishing outlets aren't in that group some newer (redesigned) sites are doing it too, see ReadWrite, BuzzFeed and Quartz. The problem as I see it is that the ...


2

You don't have to invent anything new. There's one existing web application that works similarly to what you need - Twitter. Each message there can be shown in a stream of many but it also has a unique URL and can be rendered individually. When a user gets the unique URL from the stream view, the URL leads not back to the stream but to the individual message ...


2

There isn't "a" correct answer. Depends on what your site's goals are. Depends on what goals the people using your site have. Think about what you want to achieve. Think about the assumptions you are making that are pushing you towards a infinite scrolling solution. Test those assumptions. If they work out well - go for infinite scrolling. If they don't - ...


2

My personal experience leads me to believe that you have indeed found the answer already, namely that there is no hard-and-fast rule to follow. It depends entirely on the type of content being presented and the target audience. The general rule of thumb (just guidance mind you) is that users tend to like to have both options available to them so their ...


2

One alternative is to have the facet filters horizontally across the top and contract / expand them. Have them stick to the top of the page, or under other fixed items and you have a killer combination. Also one thing worth thinking about with infinite scrolls is if you know how many items you have you can also give some indication of where the user is in ...


2

well, this is a tricky one, because: numbering pages doesn't give the user any information other than the percentage (if he makes a calculation) of how many items he has seen and how many more not viewed items remaining. ANYTHING is better than those numbers. on the other hand, this kind of items pagination is immensely popular. EVERYBODY knows what it ...



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