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0

Personally I would use a sort of predictive lazy loading. Let's say you have in total 20 rows of images and 4 rows can be shown simultaneous on screen. Then I would load the first 6 rows directly on page load so the user can see images instantaneous. Then if he scrolls down, I try to load more images, and I always try to load at least 2 rows more then the ...


2

I recently had a similar situation where there was a lot of heavy content on a page that couldn't all be loaded at the same time without unbearable load times. There are essentially two solutions. You named one which is loading all the content on the page — but not at the same time (i.e. lazy loading). The other solution to solving the problem of ...


0

If you are trying to find a way for them to easily distinguish words-as-images from real text (separate from convincing them why this is important), I would emphasize that for real text you can select individual letters. It is easy enough to just drag your mouse across a section of the page and see the selection block; for images the selection is ...


-2

I use the tin can analogy. Assume that they were out at a store, but all of the produce was in plain white boxes, or cans without labels. They wouldn't know what was inside of said packaging, nor would they want to buy, let alone try the products. It's the same issue; if someone can't see what your labels say, they're not going to buy or use the product, but ...


3

I would probably try using an analogy like alphabetic fridge magnets vs. a photograph of said fridge magnets to define a real world situation which mimics the difference. They could look at a fridge with a word spelled on it and a photo of that fridge and the concept of being able to interact with the text on one and not the other may become clearer. If you ...


3

If it's an exception and therefore very rare, I'd suggest not to intercept the 404. Because you'll run into additional problems: you can return a different image, but the caption and alt text would stay the same. That's confusing for the user and not of any help. Furthermore the user's likely to be accustomed to the default browser image but isn't familiar ...


0

In typography, big starting letters dropping over a few lines are called "drop caps" (see http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/drop_cap). The idea is similar with small pictures featured at the beginning of an article. Since yours are zoomable, they could be called "zoomable drop pics".


0

I think without real images or context, it is difficult to say what is the best approach. When the images you show are all alike, the text is some generic description, and no background of scope, don't expect people to give the best answer to you. I've had real life situations where radio buttons with only text and no images worked better; on other ...


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Since your context is people and landscapes I would go with the latter for the following reasons: The letter-boxing is ugly (well, I think so), especially when a group of images is viewed as it takes away from their uniformity. Ugly or not it is certainly distracting. For landscapes it will not particularly matter if part is cropped. It will still ...


1

You can add visibility or transparency property to your text element and manipulate it in most suitable way. For example: Add checkbox for each text element outside image so user need not to edit text to make it invisible. If user edit text and delete all symbols you can replace text in element with some placeholder text and set its visibility to false. ...


0

Mathematically speaking, flipping an image is the same as scaling it by a negative factor. Many drawing applications (e.g. Illustrator, SketchUp) let you flip an object in this way-- you scale the object to zero, and then keep going out the other side. The pinch gesture could be made to work this way, although it could be somewhat tricky to do with one ...


7

Icons are a double-edged sword. A good icon is grokkable and serves as mental shorthand for a user, improving interactions. If they see the traditional save icon, they probably won't need to read the label, and in some cases the label could be omitted to save space. This mental shortcut reduces the user's mental load. Good icons match conventions, are ...


2

In a study for designing the UI for a dental system from 2007, they found: One lesson learned from this study is that interface itself, whether GUI or TUI does not correlate with good or bad user performance. Because users have different needs depending on the application and their technical skill level, there is no good answer for this as a general ...


1

Can the one survive without the other? If you leave out the text, will people still understand the walkthrough? And vice versa, will people still understand the walkthrough if you leave out the images? This way you can determine which content is primary. If your images tell the whole story I would show the images first and support those with text. This ...



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