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I have been an iOS user for many years, and I understand that long-pressing an icon on the home screen will allow me to delete it, but I can't think of a single example of performing a long-press within an app. There may be a couple apps that do it, but without a tutorial (as many gesture-heavy apps have these days), I don't believe it is obvious. Since ...


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Iconography can sometimes be challenging due to the difficulties involved in associating them with domain specific meaning. If you want the user to upload an image it will be more explicit if you used a text-based trigger, e.g an "Upload Image" button. You do not want to utilize the iOS App Delete interaction metaphor because this would be totally ...


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Dotted overlay There is an alternative! You can try using a dotted overlay instead of a full black overlay. This has the benefit of letting some of the brightness from the image through while still creating enough contrast behind the light colored text. (image taken from this answer) You can experiment with the size/color/shape/opacity of the dots to hit ...


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Perhaps consider using both the background overlay, as well as the text and logo shadows. To provide enough contrast, you certainly need the background overlay, but I feel the text shadow can also help the text stand out above the background image.


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Definitely the first one. If you're overlaying elements on a busy image background such as something like that, you'll need a clear way to show visual hierarchy, otherwise everything appears to have the same level of visual importance (for example, in the second image the logo blends in pretty well with the white dish behind it). Designers use several ...


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Always. Never. Anything in between. This is a classic testing scenario, where the answer will depend on your testing and tracking results and nothing else. Opinions are a dime a dozen, hard data is a fact. You can change a hero image (or any other image, copy, layout, colors and more as we're at it!) based on promotions, holidays, seasons, geo, cookies, ...


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This really gets down to the purpose and audience of your hero images. Thankfully, Midas' question in the comments and your answer provides some insight and I feel that maybe you need to change the approach a little. I'm assuming that your site is for a travel agency, tourist destination, or something similar. If it was me, I wouldn't use a single hero ...


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Asking user to upload only one image and that too in very maximum size you want for your app. Later you can show them, 4 different area where user's image looks like. Try not to distrot image, use masking of images in any rectangle or elipse. Like what we see in facebook, profile picture have different size for images and the picture we see near our post ...


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As a matter of fact, you should only ask user to upload a photo with a minimum width of 750px (or even better as wide as possible with 750x400px as a minimum). You can and should offer a crop feature, but the most important part is that your app should do all the cropping and image management. Asking users to do it is like tellimg them to have no picture at ...


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Unlike video files that usually only support a constant frame rate, there’s an individual delay between frames in the animated image file formats like AGIF, APNG‌¹, MNG or SVG+SMIL‌². This (and often the lack of sound) is a fundamental difference which simple video to GIF converters cannot take advantage of. I don’t know whether there are advanced ones that ...


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Cinema uses 24 frames per second. HD video cameras typically capture at 30 or 60 fps. More frame rates When I used to create web banner adverts we used to use 12 fps to help reduce file size. However you will find the size of the colour palette affects the file size too. Certain image editing tools (Photoshop's Animation palette) allow you to set the ...


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I believe there are stats to show that real imagery converts better than illustration. I don't think illustration would be much issue if you are targeting existing customers who frequent your brick and mortar store. However new customers who have never heard of your store would be a little confuse with the product that you are selling. Unless yours is an ...


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My landing pages have large images, each of an individual building. I'm worried about information scent issues causing usability problems. The images have a parallax effect. Any suggestions on best usability practices in this case? Its ok to have full page background image unless its causing any performance issues. The image which you are using ...


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Yes, it's totally fine (and preferred) for images to be full-width. They aren't on your site now, and it's actually unsettling because of the huge contrast between the background and photos. That's the reason full-width (or full-bleed) photos are great for landing pages (and web pages in general), less contrast against the background provides better user ...


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No, it's just lazy programmers. Controls overlaying the video became commonplace when aspect ratios of screens began to more commonly match the most popular aspect ratios of movies and computing power progressed to being able to easily run multiple windows of video at the same time. Previously screens had been (more often than not) a multiple of the aspect ...


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Most tablets have higher resolution screens than the average desktop and laptop screens, and are much closer to the user's eyes. So you will have to use better images, not lesser ones, to create a good impression with tablet users. The most common Tablet resolution is 2048x1536, the most common desktop resolution is probably 1920x1080. The most common ...



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