Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

I typically use a grippy looking dotted area like this, that's also roughly the size/shape of a fingertip. ...or 3 bars indicating a similarly grippable area: The idea being to make it look like the surface of the button itself stippled or embossed - and so making it more connected to the whole button rather than being a separate function or action. ...


1

I think both are equally clear however I would never nest the twisty arrows. They feel more like a single level accordion so here are the questions I ask when deciding... If there are multiple levels of hidden child items then use + and - If there is only a single level of hidden items then either one acceptable If I can click on the entire row to ...


2

I think plus/minus is better choice for a number of reasons: User clearly understand this row has child rows Minus sign also clearly states user can close it It represents tree view with perfect understanding But plus/minus looks a bit boring if not designed well similar to your second example. So design these in way that it looks apealing to users.


0

Sharing something is a rather abstract concept which can't really be encapsulated in an icon (at least based on all the examples seen so far). That's where the problem with all of these icons comes in; if you can't get the point of sharing across to a user in an icon, the icon won't mean anything unless it's explained, and that is not good design. Despite ...


1

My preference is Font Awesome's share icon, which is pretty close to the second one in your list. The logic being that Font Awesome is a really popular library, and if we all use it's share icon then users will instantly know what it means when they come to our website/use our app etc.


0

The last one seems best, but it's not very popular, so you can't really use it. The second looks confusing, reminds me of emails, reply, outbox.


11

Use the second or third icon. If you read the article you took that image from (https://bold.pixelapse.com/minming/share-the-icon-no-one-agrees-on) you'd see that the author recommends using the second icon, the "Outgoing Tray" over the third "Three Dots" icon because the arrow helps convey sharing even to users who haven't seen the icons before and haven't ...


11

For websites, most places tend to just use icons like the ones below. This reference is from this article talking about adding them to a Blogspot. In your case, if you're just sharing between one person, I would just use the word "Share" or the phrase "Share with a friend". It's clear, to the point, and easy for your user to understand. If you do want an ...


1

No tests here but I would choose the android one (quite often used on different websites no matter the OS) If its multi sharing, the best choice is to let appear some social icons that everybody knows and use a "+" icon if you don't have enough space.


0

It is an unusual icon to use in this situation and I would avoid it. But if you have decided to go that way - I would suggest that a closed padlock means that the you are outside of the area and cant change it. The metaphor would be that you see a locked door to a room, meaning you can't access what's inside.


0

Typically the locked padlock is used to indicate to the user that an action/item is secure. For example in your web browser: Alternatively a locked padlock can be used to show that information is not accessible and requires login or other form of security to access. For example the padlock icon is used on Mac OS to show that you need to provide ...


0

Lock icon means you can't change the items status or data. It does NOT communicate whether the user is logged in or not or needs to login or not. In this case, show the text Login and for logout/sign out.


1

I would use the "blocked" icon (circle with a line) instead of a "lock" icon since "lock" has been overloaded with meaning. Something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This allows you to still use the lock for logging in securely.


0

A closed padlock is used for most login scenarios. I've never come across a open padlock unless some feature specifically allows users to lock/unlock some content. The lock and key seem to be used interchangeably to indicate login. Locks are also regularly used to indicate private/inaccessible information. Most websites use just text to accomplish the same ...


0

I think the lock is just confusing: Maybe try a little house icon with a stick man inside it - signifying the user is logged in If you need a logged out icon put the stick man next to the house.


3

Locked icons are most prevalently used to communicate whether data being submitted is secure or not and generally not the state of log in or not. Generally when you're logged in, you are "secure" and therefore a closed locked icon is used. You can however be not logged in and still submit secure data through https. Your chrome browser (and many other ...



Top 50 recent answers are included