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0

The statement I heard within IBM at the time was that this was a visual pun of sorts. Yes, the overlaid 1/0 idea was there, but the primary reference (it was claimed) was to the engineering schematic symbol for a particular kind of valve -- one in which the valve shaft rotates a disk to either block or permit flow through the pipe -- and thus was more ...


7

To answer your question: Is there any research: Not exactly. I am aware of research by NNGroup about the layout and presentation of search boxes with their labels and icons. Nothing about which way the icon is leaning. But may I say I think it's very insightful of you to ask this question. Images CAN have direction. That is, images can "point". This can be ...


0

If you look a the 100 or so magnifying glass icons you have in your question (which is a fun collection) you'll notice that the key is that they are all fairly consistent representations of a magnifying glass...essentially a circle with a stem sticking out. I don't have research on this, but I bet if you randomly chose 100 people and showed half the icon ...


3

The magnifying glass is a skeuemorphic icon. Classic skeuemorphic design principles suggest a right handed orientation will feel more natural to users because most people are right handed and would pick up the glass that way: But... The magnifying glass is so widely used it really doesn't matter that much in practice, and users are not more or less ...


2

I must say the other answers are pretty convincing and they have a substantial basis in the references cited, but I believe there is another intepretation worth considering. Yet be advised: this is pure conjecture. When you come to think about the word circuit, you will realize it resembles the word circle, and not only in English. A mechanical power button ...


0

Ask yourself first why you need an icon? Rotating one's mobile device is a fairly common and one could argue, intuitive interaction. If people need more room, they often naturally tilt it into landscape by default. I'd argue the icon is completely superfluous. The number of people that would a) be frustrated that things don't fit well in portrait and b) not ...


1

I would go both tilting rectangle and arrow. The arrows a standarized icon for refreshing/synchronizing so I won't use them alone. The rectangle alone doesn't say too much by itself, the motion part . Android uses something like this (although I don't really like that arrows) and the labeling also helps a lot:


0

If you would like to use only flags for representation then you can try using grayscale images instead of using different color's it is legal to use grayscale images of flags of countries for print purpose.


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Changing the colors of the flags would be a breach of protocol/standard use, and it could be offensive to your users. For example, if you inadvertently changed the colors to those of a rival country, or to colors that had negative meanings in that culture. Instead of flags, use standard abbreviations for the language options, such as ENG for English, ESP ...


1

This search seems to yield quite a few results: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=rotate+screen+icon&espv=2&biw=1342&bih=648&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=IaSfVcmCB8at7AbSwIHYBQ&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ Most of them seem to be based on a stylised phone icon either show at an angle with one or two arrows to denote rotation direction or ...


30

This symbol is comprised of a 1, indicating "on", and a 0, indicating "off". It was originally designed to indicate "standby", or a low power state that was neither truly on or off. At that time, a 1 inside of a 0 was the power symbol. On December 8, 2004, IEEE 1621 designated the former standby symbol as the new power symbol and designated a waning ...


0

An awesome solution to this problem that was developed to conquer this issue is Smartimage by WIDEN. I happened to discover after my company made an acquisition I found out they were using this to solve this exact problem!Its described as Cloud-based, Smartimage makes your brand assets accessible to be viewed, shared, and downloaded – from anywhere, at ...


11

While only conjecture and not supported by any evidence, this article makes a pretty good case for the evolution of the standby button: http://designblog.nzeldes.com/2008/05/the-evolution-of-the-onoff-power-switch-symbol/ The short version is that as rocker or toggle switches were replaced by momentary push-button switches the I / O symbols were merged to ...


68

It's a stylised form of the '1' and the '0' for 'On' and 'Off'. You can see the evolution here.


2

I think this is an instance where you need to push back on the client. Find out why they want icons, then create a couple of prototypes: one using labels, one using their suggested icons. Test with users, and ideally let the clients see the testing take place so they can see the problems.


2

The best icon is a text label. Also check: Should icons be used to represent "name" and "surname" in a form?


4

Text label The text label has the advantage over an icon as being more easily understood. That is, if the copy is clear enough. You can be quite sure what action will trigger when you press 'Settings' for example. Icon But icons on the other hand, can be very ambiguous. A 'wrench' for example could mean all kinds of things 'Building tools', 'Settings', ...


8

You're wondering whether the question-mark icon is universally recognised. There are two parts to this: Do your users have prior experience with a question-mark icon? Will your users recognize YOUR question-mark icon as offering Help? I can only answer the first question. I did a quick search of the various style guides. To sum up: The Microsoft ...


0

One of the way instructional designers use to show that the screenshot on a page is not complete is to show it by dashed-lines. As shown in figure 01 The same idea can be used to indicate that the screenshot is incomplete and next page shows the screenshot beginning with the dashed lines indicating continuation. Another way is to use what we traditionally ...


1

You can add black inset gradient inside image - it will suggest that image isn't displayed full. EDIT - Example image I know that this gradient is too visible, I just wanted to show what I mean.


4

You can use a 'torn page' edging style to indicate that something is continued somewhere else and in a particular direction.


1

I did a small User Testing with your icons. Chose 5 tech-savvy almost college aged kids who stay nearby and showed them the icons with the labels hidden. This is what they had to say This is the distribution for each icon Music-3 Songs-2 Movies-1 Videos-4 Search-all 5 More-all 5 But, the TV icon was ambiguous TV-3? Screen-1? Track pad-1? ...


0

I think this discussion is very interesting. On the ux podcast by Per Axbom and James Royal-Lawson I heard they talk about the "hamburger menus" used on mobile devices and how often this icon is pressed depending on if the button had the label "menu" next to it or not. I googled it and came across this related article. http://exisweb.net/menu-eats-hamburger ...



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