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The answer, as in many UX situations, is "It depends." But seriously, it sounds like: there are some areas of the system in which the Cancel button and the Remove button do different things, and need to be differentiated from each other. there are some areas of the system in which they do pretty much the same thing. First, we'd need to find out whether ...


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In my experience, Remove and Cancel are two different actions and should be treated differently. Remove implies a destructive edit (removing data that has already been created). Cancel implies a non-destructive function (such as closing out of a save modal) or exiting a data creation flow prior to saving the data to the database (such as at the end of a ...


1

I ended up splitting the table into two different sections like the following example. I added a header with an explanation of why the items in two sections are different. The original explanation header is longer and explains briefly that questionnaires were answered recently. +-----+--------+-------------------------+-------------------+ | | Item # | ...


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Using this would indicate everything nicely. You can add this the for all sections that are taking time to load.


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I agreed with Tory. Same icon for both. To add to that, if the loading is taking too long, you might want to allow the user to download the content in background mode. So user can continue their work...


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I would suggest the same icon for both. By using the same icon, you are keeping consistency within the same operation. If the user is performing the same action, the feedback for that action should be the same. Though a progress indicator would be nice, the key is that the user is given feedback that their action has been registered, and is being ...


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I would say that the answer to your question is It depends... It depends on a number of things: What are you selling? Who are you targeting? Are visitors likely to show up with a budget in mind? Are visitors likely to just purchase one thing and leave? Amazon.com is highly successful and they only show the total quantity count of the cart. This works ...


1

While I can't point you to research, it seems pretty obvious that companies don't want customers to always see the running total. Seeing the total is likely to make customers more aware of the cost and reduce spending. As a user, I would actually prefer to see the number of items, anyway. I use the shopping cart information in the navigation as a visual ...


2

In the Iconography > Action Bar section of Android Design Guidelines you can find this: In the same section you can download the "Action Bar Icon Pack". It contains the "Navigation Drawer Indicator" icon files (i.e., the hamburger icon). I think we can therefore assume the guidelines apply to that icon, too.


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For branding purposes! It’s much easier to get the layout you want creating an image in your favorite design tool, than to tweak the supposed to be character with letter-spacing, margin, border, padding and font-size, which may look awful, if users zoom in to the site. You have much more control of an image than a font character. Image by Nick Meloy ...


47

Using text rather than an image is good design when displaying text. This allows the user to interact with the text as text, doing things like copy and paste, or using alternative methods of reading the site content. However, this menu button is not actually text. It has nothing to do with the meaning of that text character (a mathematical symbol meaning ...


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If you are not already using row colours to provide information, perhaps you could use multiple shades of one colour to indicate freshness. The less fresh (riper? I concur with Jayfang, freshness seems a little counter-intuitive here) a question is the stronger/bolder the colour is to draw the user's attention to that question. Conversely, the fresher a ...


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Consider changing the concept. "Freshness" is generally seen as a positive - how can something be "too fresh"? It's not a natural concept for most users. Consider an aged product like wine or cheese "too fresh" is not really used. Rather the concepts are "not ready", "not optimal", "cellar for a while", "ready at " If the system concepts better match ...


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Suggestion 1: Use the checkbox space? If I understand correctly, when items are fresh, they can't be checked & send to other users, so you will not need a checkbox on those, or have the checkbox greyed out? Can you not use that space then to indicate 'freshness'? A light, greyed out circle containing the item's 'freshnesh' in days (eg 24d) or weeks ...


1

As I recall, excel used that green flag to denote a cell that was calculated from a function. This might confuse the average person who's seen that before. Personally, I think the best way to denote that changes are pending on a per-field basis would be to make the text bold and/or surround the field with a more pronounced text-box look. When they submit ...


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The main problem seems to be the amount of buttons not the kind of their appearance. The goal is, that your user finds the right button fast. A visual hint would help, but if the icons ar not self-explanatory, the users would have to learn their meaning which only helps if they use this form often. Anyway, each time the user has to scan all buttons to find ...


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There is no rhyme or reason as to the layout here. Consider grouping your buttons into logical groupings, perhaps emphasizing some over others based on priority of use.


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It might be best to try an alternative layout for the buttons rather than icons as knowing what an icon means outside of the staple well known ones, for things like Play, Pause, Save, Delete etc. is not always easy. It might be more worthwhile spending time on a good translator and using something like i18n for internationalisation.


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If all the buttons are required to be shown show them as a drop down menu with actions(like the hamburger icon and the drop down using it) and if not change the buttons contextually(which is easy with the basic JS)


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Summarizing the answers being provided, I think it is best practice to try and separate the actual item that you are trying to download and its status. That is, you would not use anything other than the text for the title, and you can choose from a number of different strategies to indicate its status: Icon to show download status, possibly including ...


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iOS 7 & 8 do this with the new clock circle progress widget. You can see this widget in the AppStore when you upgrade an app, or download one from the cloud. Each app to be upgraded has an "upgrade" button next to it, while each app in the cloud has a "cloud" icon button. You can also see it in the Music app, if you have songs in the cloud. When ...


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Not sure what your interface currently looks like but maybe something like this could work. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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I like how BeyondPod does it when you download podcasts. Amazon music app shows downloaded files under 'Recently downloaded' section


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Booking.com has now published new results from their own A/B testing concerning the hamburger menu. They already use a hamburger menu and replaced this in a test with a new Icon explicitly stating [Menu]. We ran that experiment against our whole user base, and given the prominence and omnipresence of this UI element, it didn't take long for this change ...



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