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4

Add text for clarity and images for quick recognition UX is more about solving problems and making things easier for people and not about pretty icons. Images should enhance an already functional UI. Although this may be way off base from what your application is trying to do this would be more intuitive to first time users...


1

If you're talking about the hamburger icon and the "me", the way to break the table appearance of your screen is to swap everything around: Put the magenta camera icon on the left and the "Me" to the left of the hamburger (menu) icon which would be on the far right. Edit after feedback about my misunderstanding of the question You are asking what will make ...


1

I'm not personally a fan of using icons in form fields, but I think it should be pointed out that they are not always just a purely stylistic choice. One of the reasons icons are increasingly used for email/password forms in particular is: browsers and plugins (like Lastpass) are increasingly insistent on autofilling these fields. And autofill behavior is ...


1

I believe it's important to maintain a design language throughout your site/app. If you use icons on one form but not on another, it may tend to confuse your users, and sometimes even mislead them into believing they're on the wrong page. I personally would get around this problem of similar fields that don't have uniquely identifying icons themselves, by ...


1

The icons in the example are fairly recognizable. And as they are there along with text, I'd say they certainly aren't harming anything. However, some things to consider (both pros and cons): email/password are perhaps the most identifiable form pattern on the internet right now. Odds are the icons aren't improving the usability at all, as a ...


1

Icons are generally used in buttons for Web and mobile applications for actions. Like email icon for u want use this button to send an email. Using icons in text field like search is valid, however, I feel there are times it's ok to use icons in text field and this case I don't think so.


8

Icons and labels If I was you I would not use icons for these specific fields, Words are (generally) unequivocal in there meaning (They obey conventions) while icons and the metaphores they represent are prone to multiple interpretations. Judging from your question, Having two icons that will look quite similar (Name & Surname being conceptually ...


2

It took a few more moments than I had thought, but Microsoft does have an up-to-date icon style guide for Modern UI. You can find it not in MSDN, but in a dedicated Windows Dev Center and its Design section.


2

Language selection is a very common UX situation and the typical solution is to spell out the language (English, Spanish, etc). If the app has a global audience you may want to use the native word for the language (eg Espanol). There are icon based approaches which can work, but icons are usually used to visualize a selection rather than present a set of ...


0

In the myriad of applications in use today, the floppy is iconic and means one thing. In a way its like latin in that it cannot be misunderstood, the association merely needs to be learned, like most other icons do anyway. For those of us that use powerful and complex tools like photoshop or visual studio, think of all of the different icons. Of these ...


5

I think you could take a more subtle approach by displaying a countdown progress-bar as in the mockup below: The benefit of using this pattern is that it conveys information about how long the action will take to complete while also conveying information about how each task compares to others (if needed) and it is also easily viewed at a glance. The ...


2

Display Using icons with tooltips: Clock icon: small swept/highlighted face section for "minute". fully swept/highlighted face for "hour". Calendar icon (like http://fortawesome.github.io/Font-Awesome/icon/calendar/) highlighted day for "day" highlighted row for "week" fully highlighted for "month" Stacked and highlighted calendars for a year. ...


0

Affordance and Signifiers. Don Norman writes about these in his book The Design of Everyday Things You should ask yourself: Are the links clickable? (Affordance) If yes, are the links recognizable as clickable? (Signifier) Do the links here work as any other links on your website? That is, while other links take you to a different page, does this one do ...



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