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5

For branding purposes! It’s much easier to get the layout you want creating an image in your favorite design tool, than to tweak the supposed to be character with letter-spacing, margin, border, padding and font-size, which may look awful, if users zoom in to the site. You have much more control of an image than a font character. Image by Nick Meloy ...


19

Using text rather than an image is good design when displaying text. This allows the user to interact with the text as text, doing things like copy and paste, or using alternative methods of reading the site content. However, this menu button is not actually text. It has nothing to do with the meaning of that text character (a mathematical symbol meaning ...


1

Probably because they didn't know it existed. It's a good idea, as long as the font you are using has the character available.


0

If you are not already using row colours to provide information, perhaps you could use multiple shades of one colour to indicate freshness. The less fresh (riper? I concur with Jayfang, freshness seems a little counter-intuitive here) a question is the stronger/bolder the colour is to draw the user's attention to that question. Conversely, the fresher a ...


0

Consider changing the concept. "Freshness" is generally seen as a positive - how can something be "too fresh"? It's not a natural concept for most users. Consider an aged product like wine or cheese "too fresh" is not really used. Rather the concepts are "not ready", "not optimal", "cellar for a while", "ready at " If the system concepts better match ...


1

Suggestion 1: Use the checkbox space? If I understand correctly, when items are fresh, they can't be checked & send to other users, so you will not need a checkbox on those, or have the checkbox greyed out? Can you not use that space then to indicate 'freshness'? A light, greyed out circle containing the item's 'freshnesh' in days (eg 24d) or weeks ...


1

As I recall, excel used that green flag to denote a cell that was calculated from a function. This might confuse the average person who's seen that before. Personally, I think the best way to denote that changes are pending on a per-field basis would be to make the text bold and/or surround the field with a more pronounced text-box look. When they submit ...


3

The main problem seems to be the amount of buttons not the kind of their appearance. The goal is, that your user finds the right button fast. A visual hint would help, but if the icons ar not self-explanatory, the users would have to learn their meaning which only helps if they use this form often. Anyway, each time the user has to scan all buttons to find ...


0

There is no rhyme or reason as to the layout here. Consider grouping your buttons into logical groupings, perhaps emphasizing some over others based on priority of use.


1

It might be best to try an alternative layout for the buttons rather than icons as knowing what an icon means outside of the staple well known ones, for things like Play, Pause, Save, Delete etc. is not always easy. It might be more worthwhile spending time on a good translator and using something like i18n for internationalisation.


-1

If all the buttons are required to be shown show them as a drop down menu with actions(like the hamburger icon and the drop down using it) and if not change the buttons contextually(which is easy with the basic JS)


0

Summarizing the answers being provided, I think it is best practice to try and separate the actual item that you are trying to download and its status. That is, you would not use anything other than the text for the title, and you can choose from a number of different strategies to indicate its status: Icon to show download status, possibly including ...


0

iOS 7 & 8 do this with the new clock circle progress widget. You can see this widget in the AppStore when you upgrade an app, or download one from the cloud. Each app to be upgraded has an "upgrade" button next to it, while each app in the cloud has a "cloud" icon button. You can also see it in the Music app, if you have songs in the cloud. When ...


0

Not sure what your interface currently looks like but maybe something like this could work. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

I like how BeyondPod does it when you download podcasts. Amazon music app shows downloaded files under 'Recently downloaded' section


0

Booking.com has now published new results from their own A/B testing concerning the hamburger menu. They already use a hamburger menu and replaced this in a test with a new Icon explicitly stating [Menu]. We ran that experiment against our whole user base, and given the prominence and omnipresence of this UI element, it didn't take long for this change ...


1

If the main issue is amount of text entered, suggest that a physical keyboard would be helpful... many tablet users have blutooth keyboards (or wired even) these days. Other users use voice input extensively. However with Swype and/or predictive input many people can type as fast on a virtual keyboard as a real one. In fact people who normally Hunt & ...


32

I think your specification is already misguided: that they MUST be on a desktop (or laptop) to properly use the system Such classifications aren't what you actually care about. What matters are specific properties that make your site work well with the device or work badly/not at all. If the properties are understandable for the end user, I'd mention ...


7

The difference between the symbols as UI element is that, from the perspective of the system, "?" is passive, and "i" is active: With the "?", the system offers the information to the user, that he needs when he has a question. With the "i", the system offers the additional information to the user, that may be useful even when he does not have a question. ...


29

The convention is that the question mark indicates extensive help is available, provides an interface for someone having a problem to click, and implies that a more sophisticated means of resolving the problem is being offered. The (i) indicates only that some additional explanatory information is available, but not an extensive help system. Think of an ...


1

well, for portfolio you could obviously use a typical porfolio/briefcase icon, but hear me out on this: I am assuming your portfolio is about a creative service, probably design, right? Why not go for something creative? I mean, none of those icons tells me nothing, and as a matter of fact if they tells me something, is that you didn't worry very much ...


0

Why not stick with the names and avoid using the icons there? No matter which icons you pick, you'll never achieve the descriptiveness of the text.


1

If I remove the text, will people still understand the icons? That's the question to ask yourself. Your icons don't pass this test, but to be fair, most icons don't pass because there are relatively few things that have universally established visual representations. I call it the paradox of icon usage: an icon should be so universal it could be used ...


4

There are quite a few usability concerns with option one which I would caution against: You are making the assumption that users can understand that the word prepaid and it has a whole list of options namely credit card, debit card and netbanking. The user is left to make an assumption about the word prepaid entails which can lead to many ...



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