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3

I would probably suggest icon first, then text; the text after the icon could then theoretically be any length (within reason), as opposed to the 'text first' approach which would leave your icon trailing behind in the distance. Also languages like English, Greek, Latin, Cyrillic etc are all written and read from left to right (unlike languages like Hebrew ...


0

If the menu is the master section of a master-detail pattern, it should probably be on the left in English and adjusted to the right in RTL languages. This is because if follows the direction of reading and the hierarchy people are used to in that locale. Besides, putting RTL text in a menu that slides from the left is a bit weird... would you align it ...


0

I would like to share with you this ab test results http://exisweb.net/menu-eats-hamburger


1

The independent web-publishing firm Exis has been engaging in a number of A/B tests measuring the success of the "list" (or sometimes called the hamburger) icon. Their last test was statistically significant to start drawing some conclusions. Some of their key findings: The word "Menu" performed about 20% than the "list icon." Android were 3x less likely ...


3

http://thenextweb.com/dd/2014/04/08/ux-designers-side-drawer-navigation-costing-half-user-engagement/?utm_content=buffer044a9&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer http://www.exquisitetweets.com/collection/lukew/2919 http://exisweb.net/mobile-menu-abtest The hamburger icon and it's affordance has been hot topic for ...


4

Actually, my company recently did a bunch of field research, and the results were completely mixed, even across age and experience -- most knew of the symbol, but most misinterpreted its meaning. We hypothesized this happens because of how the symbol is used across larger platforms such as Google Chrome and Facebook, i.e., it's not always used to mean the ...


1

If you are referring to the Hamburger button, then I would say yes, it's fairly known now as a metaphor for a menu on mobile devices, and thus making it's way to the desktop (responsive) web as well. As for the medium, they can afford quite innovative design because their target audience is internet savvy. The pattern is certainly unintuitive.


0

I would recommend the icon-with-caption option. Your visual treatment of the captions is sound, so don't worry that it "doesn't look good." A big reason why I suggest this is there are not instantly recognizable icons that mean "syllabus", "quiz", and "feedback", etc. So you will never be able to communicate those features with a bare icon. Moreover, the ...


0

The point is not "flat", "3d" or any other design. The point is "does the icon behave like an icon?" An icon is meant to represent some thing with out the need for words. E.G. Which icon represents "Photo's" better the one on iOS 6 or on iOS 7 or some other icon? Which icon represents "Settings" better? Yes I know they have words under them but the ...


0

To pull in the content of that related question, this is basically a re-discovery of application toolbars that were so popular in the 90's. A Microsoft study/paper found that once the user was familiar with the UI, text was useful as an additional visual marker, to help distinguish the shapes of the buttons. So, a horizontal toolbar with labels to the side ...


2

The button to initiate the delete of an item can be an icon. After clicking this it is considered good practice for irreversible actions have a confirmation / cancel option as either a screen or a little inline control (depending on the magnitude of the delete). At this point the user needs more reassurance of what exactly will happen. They must have ...


0

To expand on the "hallway testing" suggestions already mentioned. You can do the following things: Create a paper mockup that uses the icon without a label and ask users what they think it represents. If they don't know, start feeding them bit by bit to see how far they are from working it out. Then tell them and ask whether they consider it a viable icon. ...


-1

I haven't read stake exchange ux folks recommendations, so it can be a repeat suggested process. I would strongly recommend to follow AB Testing process. When you are testing especially the icons or two objects this would help. Follow the below steps. Show them a single icon with plane background and ask what they relate to. After you complete the above ...


1

One question that comes to mind is are the functions/actions associated with those icons common knowledge or are they native to your product? If native to your product, one thing to think about is the primary action or purpose behind what they signify. You need to identify the expectations of the users for clicking those icons and create imagery aligning ...


0

Since your icons all have labels, it seems to me that the labels are the crucial part of the UI here. As long as the icons are unique, it shouldn't matter what they are--as long as the labels are meaningful to the users. But if you still want to test the icons, I'd suggest a simple bucket-sorting type of exercise. Show the icons: 1. ----- 2. ----- 3. ...


1

I am a big fan of hallway testing. Go find someone who has never seen your application (e.g. Sarah in Accounting, or your mom) and ask them for a few minutes about your application. You can just use printouts to make it easier to go from person to person.


3

You have a few options, depending on your time and resources. Use a survey. Show the icon, and give the survey respondent 4 options for what the icon could represent. If you do this, you'll need a relatively large number of respondents to do the statistical analysis necessary to get a good confidence interval. Ask users what they think icons represent. ...


0

Humans are very bad at judging difficulty and complexity, and almost as bad at communicating difficulty in any standard unit. How much easier is a task with a difficulty of 5 than one with a difficulty of 6? Is it really the same amount of difference as a task that has a difficulty of 1? The solutions to this problem vary, but they tend to do one of two ...


0

It depends on the importance of the complexity indicator. How useful is it for the user? Looking at your graph i see that you have a lot of variation in your complexity rating: 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2.5, 3. One way i see it is as a green to red bar: You can incorporate more colors in it (like orange) or do it as a scale (like Alexei suggested). This would allow ...


1

I guess you could try and ask your testers what the icons mean to them. You could try this by giving them more or less context (about where the icon will be, what tooltip will be available, etc.) to see if they can guess what they will be used for.


0

I think it's fair to say that Microsoft really managed to 'screw-the-pooch' on their Visual Studio 2012 icon re-design. Even after extensive usability test with positive results (approx. 50 users, but a poorly constructed test). It was the Beta program and community feedback that lowered the damage. Taking a lesson from this you may try some community ...


5

I'd recommend: to have limited number of complexity levels. Because having a lot of those create cognitive barrier. As complexity is not absolute category, people will interpret it subjectively and think a lot before making decision. It's better to use 3 or 4 levels to name levels in appropriate way. Labels allow to refer to levels in clear way and to ...


2

You should just use some descriptive words like "Simple," "Intermediate," and "Complex." A number of stars is just that: A number. And if you use a number, than you have to explain the unit of measurement. Why do that when natural language offers words specifically meant for this situation? For the best implementation, I would give each word a tooltip that ...


1

I don't think there are any studies about this specific subject, although if I'm wrong, I'm sure somebody will point us to those studies. Considering standard actions, like delete, there is no overhead for the user regarding additional words to describe the relation between the action and the object over which the action is going to happen. It's about the ...


1

Standard icons for standard actions like create, delete, search, will leverage the user's existing knowledge. Creating icons for custom objects in a UI can get tricky. If you are managing a very large number you may overwhelm the user with too many similar but "slightly different" icons. If an icon doesn't leverage the user's existing knowledge then it adds ...


0

Does the system clearly communicate WHY these records are not editable? Does the user understand this in terms of their domain? I would consider Nielsen's "visibility of system status" heuristics applies not about "what controls are active on a record" but rather "what is the logical status of a record". When user understands this status, then the change ...


0

I would use one action on the rows that can't be editable: "see details", and two actions on the rows that can be editable: "see details" and "edit". Using any other symbols or icons would be confusing for the user, because he will have to decode these symbols, and the whole operation will take much more time to complete. I think there should be also an ...


2

Most sites and applications will display the edit icon if an item is editable, otherwise nothing. Here is an example from the web UI that manages our automated builds (developed by Atlassian). The more general paradigm is to have an "actions" column with icons representing all the things you can do with a row in the table. Clicking on the action icon ...


0

I would recommend having the view, edit, and delete icons always present. This allows you to have a consistent look and feel while at the same time allowing the user to choose what mode they want to view the details in, edit mode or read-only mode. This is for registry keys, but here's a grid showing the always present look and feel:


1

You first need to ask yourself if you really need two icons. If you don't, just using text that says 'search' is a possible solution. Also, it is about context...if their is a magnifying glass on an image, humans very quickly understand it's function, if next to text, it is search. Your best solution: Have the zoom icon only show on hover of an image, so ...


0

I've actually read that icons for product categories are not a good UX choice if not accompanied by text - different groups assign different meaning to them.


0

icons are a good way to improve people's ability to remember things. If you go poke at the research you'll find that this isn't true. The references at http://uxmyths.com/post/715009009/myth-icons-enhance-usability will get you started. That's not to say icons are without value. For example if you absolutely need to pack in a large number of tools in a ...


3

You could do the magnifying glass for magnify & binoculars for search. If you added a + with the magnifying glass, that may help distinguishing its function.


0

I think there are plenty of studies that can show how many items people can keep in mind, but all that is short-term memory and depends on how well people can chunk information. For your question, however, I don't believe there is a definite answer. As with all things in UX, it depends on your user: are all 2000-4000 icons exposed to all your users, or are ...


1

Will the geo data for all users be pulled in a batch every 5 minutes? If so you could probably do away with the (potentially confusing) changing avatars, and simply put something on the top or bottom of the screen advising the user of the time since the last refresh - You might even give the user the ability to 'force' a refresh of the data. If you were ...


2

Don't rely on colour only First, I would urge you not rely on colour for semantics, this is to consider the colour blind (8% of male population). You can have the icons coloured, but you should provide different symbols for each state. Icons are nearly always unclear and ambiguous Second, nearly all icons are ambiguous and unclear, particularly for new ...


0

The naming of these buttons is crappy. I'm attending also means I'm interested! Do I click both of them? What happens if I'm just interested? Also, if one button says "18 attending" and other says "I'm interested", it'll be normal for me to think that clicking "I'm interested" will add me to the list! After all the other is just giving info, how do I know ...


2

I think there's a confusion between several elements: Action and current state: the button is supposed to allow me to RSVP as "Attending". But it also shows the current number of people attending. Is it a button or just a label? I and others: so the button shows that 18 are attending. How do I add myself as an attendee? I'm supposed to click a button ...


1

1.-Should I make an icon to represent the button? Icons can be really confusing, ambiguous, and they add to the time it takes the user to interpret the design. The general recommendation is that if you can say it with words - you should. You should definitely not base the interface on icons only, but you may consider adding them next to the text. Like ...



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