Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Icons are a double-edged sword. A good icon is grokkable and serves as mental shorthand for a user, improving interactions. If they see the traditional save icon, they probably won't need to read the label, and in some cases the label could be omitted to save space. This mental shortcut reduces the user's mental load. Good icons match conventions, are ...


7

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles "Pins". And ...


5

Here is a good example - even though you stated that "Pay What You Want" will not fit. There are several good aspects of this that you may apply to your UI. (from losttype.com) They equate Pay-What-You-Want with a Personal License in the description. This may or may not apply to your situation, but it allows you to describe it in one place, and keep the ...


3

Two ideas... Have a trash icon that triggers a small dropdown with two options -- Remove from session -- Remove permanently Think GMail menu in email view with trash having dropdown like "More" Have an x for session and trash for permanent with a small, nice tooltip description (not preferable if you have a mobile audience) Good luck! Hope it helps!


3

"Set price" or "Price" should work. More importantly, I think you can convey the fact that pay what you want by showing an input field instead of a price. That way, users wouldn't even have to read the tag to understand that it's up to them to determine the price. This would work especially well in places where users have already been "trained" to expect a ...


2

"Markers" is probably the best technical term. "Pins" is probably the most common word in a non-technical, colloquial sense. I tend to agree with @Benny in the sense that you should use what is most familiar to your users - however I don't think that that vast of a majority of users call it a "pin" as opposed to "marker". But I'm just speculating, so go ...


2

On mobile screens the size of your canvas is limited. For aesthetic and practical value most input fields span the entire width of the screen save for some margin left and right of the input field. This leaves no room for the checkmark icon being on the outside of the input field. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...


2

Luke Wroblewski and Etre did some research into inline form validation and tested a range of different approaches with 22 average users. With regard to positioning the validation inside the field versus outside, they didn't find any substantial benefit to the former and noted that validation cannot be positioned inside all fields anyway so it would be ...


2

If these things are strongly correlated in users' minds to geographic locations, then I would certainly try to work "location" or "point" into the name. If these are reports of incidents or conditions, and only weakly correlated to geography, you might call them "issues", "reports", "incidents", etc. All the examples you gave seem to fall more into the ...


2

IMO it really depends on the context of your App/Site. Using the text which suits your context may becomes more intuitive for the user as well as he builds a frame of reference. I worked on a shopping App, They were specifically showing shopping categories in hamburger menu. For them its a great idea to use the text like below Many Shopping apps may ...


2

I would argue that the most accurate word besides menu would be "navigation". Shortening it to nav might be alienating for a less tech-literate audience. But stay aware of innovating for the sake of innovation."Menu" is a metaphor that is pretty well-established and has taken years for users to internalize. On one hand I think it is important to stay ...


1

You can use an icon that represents the theme of awarding, and put the score inside it. For example, something this can be used..


1

Supposing that the usual action is to delete the item for the session, you could try to display only one delete action. After the item has been deleted from the session, you could fade it out and add display another CTA that says something like "Delete Forever" (GMail uses this wording). This has two advantages: less space used, as only one option has to ...


1

What about calling them Points of interest? This is descriptive to your user, doesn't have a positive or negative connotation and is clear on what it means. Using markers or pins is a good way to describe the icon, but what you want to describe is the actual location. For this reason I would advise calling them:"points of interest", "locations" (as ...


1

If it's an internal system you're designing for, I assume the user just needs to carry out a task/get a quick overview, so the icon perhaps doesn't need to be rich in emotional value, if that makes sense. Though it might seem boring/insensitive and not immediately intuitive, a simple 'D' for 'deceased' in a circle, with a neutral or no colour (and a ...


1

Sometimes in English, an asterisk is used to denote birth and a dagger (†) death. It's often used in genealogy with dates (e.g.*1918–†1993). Wikipedia says this typographical symbol is not to be confused with a cross, but I could forgive the association. So that would be an aspect to consider if you decide to employ it. Ultimately though I don't sliver the ...


1

What comes to mind is something like "Best Offer" because I think it will encourage people to at least think of a price rather than just instantly grabbing the freebie. I think you could also use the word "Free" but on the checkout page you can implement a message which says something like "This product is currently available for free but please consider ...


1

Icon + text for maximum clarity as @Kane says, and for the icon you could go with perhaps the easiest way of indicating "un-": put a very clear slash or cross on top of it.


1

“@aj_ux: STOP PRESS: I solved the hamburger menu problem everyone pic.twitter.com/7aG2V1POa5” Everyone loves a compromise.— Jonty Sharples (@Gringomoses) June 10, 2014


1

Could the answer be that (like number 4) things are now on tables? Computer screens sat on tables and walls in front of you and you looked "out of/through" them. Think of the XP fields. The metaphor was one of a window, and postive light, and the light fell (in the wrong direction) on drop-shadow buttons. You were looking out and depth was important and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible