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8

When you are choosing icons, they should be the same style with the rest of the interface. If your interface is glossy, use glossy icons. If its flat design use flat icons. The important thing is not to mix them. For example, if your interface has 3D shapes or elements, don't use 2D icons, because they contradict the look and feel. Also, the primary use of ...


6

I have installed a few games with this in it and I personally couldn't find any evidence to support my explanation online after quite a brief search but here's what my thinking is: 1. File Transfer Rate. 2. CD Read Rate 3. CPU/Disk Memory The first one was dependent on the file being downloaded/transferred. It used to be dynamic and the greater the bars, ...


5

It keeps the icons in a single column when the eye scans down from the app icon. A user familiar with the icons can easily scan down to find the right selection. They are not forced to scan to the far right (in the case of the second example) to find their selection.


4

The Floppy disk icon is a common icon that's been engraved into the minds as the Save icon. Apart from that, you could also use the Tick to signify Done and Save Ideally you should follow the guidelines specified for the Smartphone's OS.


3

Icons is a very complex matter. What I mean is that if you respect the rules of UX, there are only a few icons that are very well known globally that don't need a label to be understood. Icons can often get different interpretations (related to culture, related to imagination, related to context, related to metaphors). However context can help as well. For ...


2

From my experience, it's almost always best not to use an icon without text if there isn't already a very, very commonly used icon for the desired action. I was once running a comprehension test on potential users for the Waze gps app and almost no one could say what one of their icons was supposed to communicate because they had never seen it before.


2

Use a colour to represent "selected" and grey scale to represent "unselected". You can do this against a dark background too (as long as the "selected" and "unselected" has enough visual contrast and visual harmony against that darker background)


2

I agree with you. The fact that at least three of us UX-minded people think it was a bad choice indicates that it probably was one. The symbol they're using is the "no" symbol or the "prohibition" symbol, which means something a bit different.


2

I like Google Material Icons' Add Location icon:


2

I agree with other answers/comments that indicate that you'll want to keep with the consistency/theme of the OS, however I'm going to add some "food for thought". The trend of "modern" flat icons is good from the standpoint of simplicity however I feel that sometimes we throw away some usability factors like discoverability just to get a flat look. I ...


1

Just add a grey square around the icon so it looks selected. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

It is pretty common to represent "work in progress"-states with color variations using the same icon as the "complete state". You could take a look at a few online scrum tools to get some more inspiration on how they do it. Since they all tackle "work in progress"-states. One example is Microsofts Visual Studio Online: (see picture)


1

This is normally done something like this... "More..." so you can just use three dots as an icon. ... This is now how iOS does it, too.


1

I think flag is appropriate though. Like Swapnil Borkar said in his comment: it's used to identify an object as something (error, unappropriate content, etc.) But then again, it also depends on the context you're asking. For bugs, usually the icon is a bug, for errors it could be an exclamation mark.


1

It's best to use an icon that people already know. The Apple Store uses this: The App Store uses this: Note that they both include a text label.


1

Is this icon helpful? Description: Arrow: Shows files needs to be downloaded. Plus: Shows files are new. Horizontal Bar with three white circles: Shows an electronic system where new files will be downloaded. Let me know if that works.


1

Ok, on a more serious note: I envision a badge or certificate-looking seal with an up arrow to indicate "Upgrade". Something like this:



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