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-5

My professional experience with major, international web marketers may be of relevance. None of them. Not one of them. True. And, I guess, I can answer as an expert in the field when I say that no research has been conducted to determine the percentage of device users that know how to open links in new tabs/windows. Probably, lack of funding has seriously ...


2

Also underline. An arrow is probably better in 88% of cases, but if adding an arrow seems to disagree with an UI then underlining is definitely the way to go. If you're going to introduce shopping, even more so. I'm just say saying. (tags don't include <u> ?)


1

I'd just like to provide a slight counterpoint - not quite answering your question (tohster and nightning have done that well), but answering a point behind your question: Carousels are bad UX. See http://shouldiuseacarousel.com/ . It makes the point succinctly and effectively. It references pages such as ...


0

They were replacing buttons with hyperlinks for no other reason that to be "with it". Did the UX team actually say that was the reason for replacing buttons with hyperlinked text? I can think of other reasons why they'd do this. Maybe there are too many buttons of equal emphasis on the screen and they wanted to create hierarchy by leaving the most ...


0

I'd say keep things within the mental model of the users: hyperlinks redirect users to screens/ pages (I'm leaving this page; I can open this in a new tab, etc); buttons perform some kind of action that may or may not also include change in navigation. Hyperlinks (which are a different color to capture users' attention) could be used as references to take ...


0

Probably not Hyperlinks and buttons have very different UX suitability: Hyperlinks Hyperlinks are suitable for space constrained situations (e.g. inline text, toolbars, or menus) or situations where buttons would be too intrusive (see this for example). Hyperlinks are also popular in consumer (non-expert) applications where a designer wants to highlight ...


0

UX teams should not be doing anything because it is "with it." They ought to be determining how people are using the application; what they're trying to do while using it and coming up with ways to make the user's interaction with the software be as effortless as possible. Sometimes things are disruptive such as going from a DOS based system (yes they still ...


2

I agree with others that it's a base design issue but if you can only change the top bar... Because of the colors used in the navigation of the "current product," you should use color to separate the product navigation from the current product. Use colors to disable buttons. You could left-justify the top navigation to separate it further. ...


2

None of the above? I mean this in a constructive way. Issues: You have 3 layers of navigation onscreen at the same time, which is pretty complicated for users. On top of that, the visual layout is confusing because you have a top navigation, and then a break for page title, then 2 more layers of navigation that are visually related by the tab idiom ...


1

Additionally for clarity, one could also try altering the messaging of the "Home" button in the tabbed navigation, given that's the primary area a user will think to navigation. For example, you could try something like: Home - Accounting I also agree a combination of mockups A & C would work, with the underline being the most effective visual cue. A ...


2

Version C, with the underlines, is superior because it does not rely purely on colour but also has that additional visual clue. That makes it more accessible to people who have difficulty or simply cannot interpret differences in colour. I would however include colour as an additional clue in addition to the underline.


9

Two approaches: Denote the caption better as an interactive element. See nightning's excellent answer on this. Make the entire image clickable (not just the caption). Clicking on the body of the image opens the link, and clicking near the arrows operates the carousel navigation. As an aid to web users, you can play with different hover animations ...


13

Consider using an arrow or caret to denote there's deeper content. It's a common enough icon that's used often at the end of a text blurb for Call To Action buttons. It's not ideal, but should translate okay on a carousel title. e.g.



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