New answers tagged

1

I previously worked for a company sent out roughly 1 million subscriber emails an hour to people subscribed to bulletins, should those users choose to respond to those emails they would click a link to go to our web site where they would continue on their journey. After much research, as every response was effectively money in the bank we came to one simple ...


0

Though it depends on what type of users you are dealing with, but in most of the cases yes it's required. For example if there is a page of "terms and conditions" , or say "our team". Because of mental model of the user(most of the websites place it on the bottom) normal user tendency will be, to look at the bottom of the page (Footer). But, if you are ...


3

I like the style you have going on. Try breaking up the two links into buttons like this? You don't have to underline text in a button on hover. Underlining is meant more for in-text links. Perhaps add a subtle drop shadow on hover for each button.


3

simply style them as buttons, this way there won't be any doubt at all and you'll eliminate any friction on the perceived affordance of these elements. It's as simple as that. Otherwise, underline them, just as you mention. But more important: use one color for links and a different one for text. Your perception probably comes from the fact nothing (...


-1

The most obvious way to make something look like a link is to underline it. So underline. I think, from your example, that these are clearly links. The position, the container, and the words themselves, even when the hover state is not activated, say 'link'. Why are you unsure about the obviousness of these links? How do you know? If you test with users (...


0

Open a new tab when you leave the basic navigational structure of your website. This is a very "open" rule, since a lot of minor things can take you away from said structure, but bear with me. Searching, finding Always allow a user to navigate to anywhere on your site. Every page you show should have some way to escape the current funnel, and switch to a ...


0

The most common situations when I chose to make a link open in a new tab are when I am taking the user away from my site to another site but I don't want them to leave my site completely, or when I am linking to something contextual for what they are working on, on my site. Consider these examples: 1. I don't want them to leave my site Say I am running ...


7

I cannot answer #2, but I can take a stab at #1 with some explanation. Background The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 (the basis for Section 508 in the US, some international regulations, and the ADA guidelines that the DoJ has used in recent lawsuits) have some guidelines on this. Success Criterion (SC) 1.4.1: Use of Color: Color is ...


2

There are many ways to address this, essentially the aim is to differentiate links from other text on a site. While an underline is the default way that browsers make this apparent, you could use a high contrast color difference, a 'highlight' effect, a custom bottom border, or a link icon. I think the best approach to this is to think of your aim and why ...


1

I'm partial to still opening new tabs. The advantage to opening a new tab is allowing the user to fork their browsing session like the would on desktop. Most mobile browsers (at least Chrome) have the back button set up to close the new tab to maintain the linear flow for the user if that's how they're navigating.


2

Warning: This is an opinion and have no way to demonstrate the validity of the answer other than the Duck Test or Occam's Razor. It's not that they don't know what they're doing. They did have easy to find logout buttons before. Now they don't, for what it appears to be another chapter in corporate wars The whole philosophy behind this is to keep the ...


1

I like Splatz answer, but I'd like to add why some deliberate attempts make sense: The logout function is not that used on some websites, such as some email providers. Lots of users only read their emails at home on devices they trust, so they never logout. When using a public device they use the private mode of the browser they're using, so closing the tab ...



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