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0

Imagine you can't see the page and you're using a screen reader to navigate. A screen reader has a function to read out the links on a page. Ask yourself, if I heard this read out loud out of context, would I understand where it was taking me? The text that would clarify where you're going is what you want to be the link. As I'm writing this response ...


2

Firstly, the location of the signature is in what I sometimes call the 'suicide slot' - bottom right of most pages is an area people ignore (based on eye tracking heatmaps). It's partly an aesthetic judgement, but there's too much going on visually here for me. I would consider making everything in the same style apart from the link - the link will stand out ...


5

I think how you have placed the hyperlink is fine. There are various rules out there for using hyperlinks on a sentence like Vitaly explained. Personally for me, if the link was to take me to a different page I'd expect the sentence to be constructed so that there is an explanation (e.g: "Those interested in Arts and Crafts, please Commit to") followed ...


50

The idea of 'click here' being a bad idea originated from data about how people visually scan web pages which show that people don't read online: they skim the page to get the key information. If someone is scanning, 'click here' (particularly if there are lots of them!) links are totally meaningless in isolation: the user has to spend time reading around ...


1

For accessibility (screen readers, this is fine. (But less than 5% of the market for a general website) The reason "Here" and "Click Here" are bad is because they are useless words. They provide no context. This isn't an accessibility issue; it is a usability issue. There's an overwhelming amount of evidence that website visitors don't read, they scan. They ...


11

It doesn't matter one bit. To get on my soapbox for a second, one of the biggest problems of non-professional UX is that people will read some article or other, containing some specialized advice or guidelines, with specific reasoning, appropriate for specific circumstances. But they won't remember any of the "specific" parts, they will just think that the ...


1

The share and save links are fine because: Icons/Buttons alongside text. Knowledge of word meaning and standardised placement of links makes it an intuitive location to put them. Good colours away from the standard text colours of the page. Why the heading for the 'element' is not so good: Same colour, styles (and size?) as the top header Image ...


2

I believe the simplest answer to the primary question is based on the following logic: If it didn't link to the home page, then where else? If it didn't link anywhere, wouldn't that be a waste? It's desirable to hyperlink anything that can logically and unambiguously be linked in the context. Therefore I would say it is no accident of ...


1

The existing answers claim that it is done merely because it has become a self fulfilling standard. That may be partially true but neither are UX answers and they miss out why it is intuitive. A user often clicked on a site logo to get to your site, so it is consistent and makes perfect sense for any click on the same logo to take you back to that same ...


0

Your question contains answer in itself because of word 'Navigation' Navigation When a user views a website and wants to go to the home page there will have to be a link to the home page. If the website LOGO is not linking to the home page then the user will have to select a "home" link on the Navigation bar. Users familiar with Big Brand sites are ...


46

Where was this first seen This practice dates back at least to the earliest days of image hyperlinks. For example, the Internet Archive's earliest snapshot of Yahoo's home page from October 1996 has a clickable Yahoo! logo. Why has it become an industry standard? 1. Convention Conventions are self-perpetuating. Given the ubiquity of this practice, ...


48

It's become standard because everyone does it. Everyone does it because it's nice to have a 'home' link but it's not something that needs to clutter the menu, either. Hence the idea to just make the logo link to the home page. Not sure if anyone can answer where this was first seen. But I recall doing it close to 2 decades ago so I think its been around ...


3

From an accessibility point of view regarding the styling of visited links, the following links are good to read up on: http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-UAAG20-Reference-20140925/#sc_131 http://webaim.org/blog/wcag-2-0-and-link-colors/ Both provide good examples as to why it's important to style visited links differently. The first link is a direct ...


6

There are plenty of sources online about visited link color, but one credible source is Nielsen Norman Group. Both Jakob Nielsen and Donald Norman have each spent more than 20 years researching user behavior and user experience. They say: People get lost and move in circles when websites use the same link color for visited and new destinations. To ...


1

The entire experience of getting users into a new application and familiar with how to use it is referred to as "User Onboarding." This process can include tutorials, how-to graphics & animations, or buttons & notifications pointing out new features. This is often a first-time/one-time thing, but users can usually access the content through a ...


1

I think JeromeR has covered quite a few names for the button. We used "Get me started" for our website. The particular behaviour is often called "Web Tour" or "Guided Tour". Related JS plugin links - Bootstrap Tour , IntroJS


2

The name of that button could be anything appropriate to the users you're addressing. it could be: New here? Show me Take a tour Important 3 quick things and so on. A related question you might want to ask is this: What is the name of this process of welcoming and user-instruction? This concept has a name: first experiences. First experiences ...


7

It sounds like your real problem isn’t designing how to show a link is non-reversible. Your real problem is your app has committed the cardinal sin of breaking the Back button, which is an issue going beyond how you mark links in each list item. Solving the Real Problem Solutions, from most to least preferred: Fix the Back button. Okay, you say that the ...



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