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1

They're very bad UX, and the main reason of opposition to Material Design as a whole. To answer your specific question and why they do it: Raised buttons behave like a piece of material resting on another sheet—they lift and fill with color on press. Flat buttons are printed on material. They do not lift but fill with color on press. Button ...


2

It's a bad design pattern in the context of the example...where there's just text floating in space by itself. But in context, it maybe a perfectly valid design pattern. Controls have their own affordances (or lack thereof) but also gain (or lose) affordance based on the context they are placed in as well. This is why it's a challenge to build pattern ...


2

Sometimes, the ability to do the same thing in multiple ways feels awkward to the user because the user cannot choose easily between the methods. This happens when each method seems to be at the same level in the user's model of the interface. In fact not just at the same level, but if you imagine a tree-like hierarchy, then at the same node. If you talk ...


2

Paradox of choice This is actually called the paradox of choice, by Schwartz. Basically, the more options you offer, the less choices will be made by the user. This YouTube video is a clear explaination of the book. Cognitive dissonance The small amount of users that finally decide to choose, will mostly face cognitive dissonance after choosing. Which ...


2

My recommendation would be to set the: image's alt attribute to specify a text equivalent for the image link's title attribute to describe the resource being linked to <A href="https://lebowskifest.com/fests/lebowski-fest-new-york" title="Lebowski Fest New York in August 2014"> <IMG ...


0

ALT text serves a dual purpose. Purpose 1: Simple Google search for "purpose of alt tag" shows the following answer... The alt text within the ALT tag should let the user know what an image's content and purpose are. Alt text is accessed by screen reader users to provide them with a text equivalent of images. In visual browsers, the alt text is ...


-1

first, I'd consider if an image is actually the best way, in any case, to act as a link; unless the you literally make it super clear that clicking the image will link you to this or that end point, aka as a signifier; perhaps you can show (a basic version of) your link image, which would help to asses that. Provided that you give the image a clear ...


3

You should not do this for a couple of reasons: first, as has been said before, users are used to clicking on the logo to go to the home page. This phenomenon called baby duck symptom means that users stick to things that they already know. Changing where the logo links would also be a violation of the "Consistency and Standards" Heuristic. (Users should not ...


1

You have raised a good point but linking logos to "Home" page is more like a convention now. For a better user experience it would be advisable to link it to the home page because you don't want your user's to think hard while using your website. The flow of the actions should be smooth.


6

Notwithstanding the familiarization aspect from almost every other website, linking to the about page has a couple of serious issues. Firstly, if you link it to the about page, then you still need a link to the important home page. So now you need another prominent home logo or home menu item. This would add clutter, complexity and potentially confuse. ...


2

I think its more like 'trained behaviour', repeat a pattern enough until it is accepted, kinda like the hamburger icon. (although it provides lower discoverability, it has its place it the world. Another way of looking at it, is that the landing page is in part the about page: looking at the home page should definitly give you clues of the information ...



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