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I once read an article about creating web pages, which cautioned designers that their icons might be meaningful to the designer but were meaningless to users. With the transition from text based DOS applications to graphics based Windows programs, developers seem obsessed with replacing perfectly understandable words with funny little pictures. Just ...


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From examining this website, I can see why the title link here does it. Looking aat the page source code I see the link is in the (class="question-hyperlink"). That is here at the top for the article, but it is the same link and class when the article excerpt is displayed in the question page. Each Question has its own div with the link, excerpt and other ...


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I've been surfing the net since it's inception. I can say that I perceive underlined text of the fore color to be plain text, and underlined; or not underlined text of a different color as possible links, and I usually hover over them if not underlined and observe the status bar to see if this is so. I also perceive text in a box as a button to a link and ...


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It is hard to say whether everyone does, but the majority who use the interest would. Nielson Norman group guidelines specify underlining links and the majority of websites tend to follow this. Nielson Norman Group - Guidelines for visualising links. There is not much research on this so the best way to find out? Conduct a study yourself, you could have a ...


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Your question is complicated in that it's embedded in a bad practice. This Smashing Magazine article about why your links should never say "Click here" sums it up quite well. "Click" puts too much emphasis on mouse mechanics, "here" conceals what is being clicked, and in your example, "go to" is implicit in the action of a link. Assuming for the sake ...


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Option 1 Adequate, the word "here" is representing exactly where the user can click Option 2 Inadequate, you are telling the user that click in a place but the action is located elsewhere Option 3 Is a mix between #1 and #2, but is not common. There is generally a one to one relationship between a link and an action. I'd avoid it. Option 4 Most ...


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Ask yourself the following: Is the content on the web page supposed to be disclosed and hidden from unauthorized users? Do you want to restrict social sharing from those users you’re e-mailing? Is it a bad thing that users you haven’t e-mailed also get hold of the information through trusted friends? Do users in general trust an obviously unsafe password ...


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Simply put: people expect to see a video when they click 'watch video'. I think it very much depends from user to user, what implementation he expects (what is he used to?). With the visual design you can give hints of how thing are going to work. So for example, if you choose for the first implementation: leave some white space for the video and make the ...


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I will give one of the best answers now. Ofcourse the colors have meaning.There this flower named as Lupinus Argenteus which is usually blue in color. But after a Bee visits the flower and obtains nectar from the flower, the color changes to purple in a few days. This makes the Bee understand that the flower has been visited and doesn't waste its time in ...


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I recommend that 'Cancel' should be removed and retain the "Back to..." link. Currently, initiating either the "Cancel" and "Back To..." actions invoke the same abandonment of the use case of making updates to this user profile. The only difference is that the "Back To.." link is more explicit in where the user will be taken compared to the "Cancel" button. ...


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The answer to this is going to heavily depend on the transition between the list and the details view. For example, if the details view slides in (not a hard refresh), then it makes more sense for the buttons to be "Save" and "<- Back", indicating that it moves you back to the list view. If the details view appears above the list view, then "Save" and ...



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