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1

I would suggest a solution of a button instead of link as users have more familiarity with buttons rather than Descriptive Links due to usage of buttons on desktop and PC software Swap your Continue Reading link to a BUTTON saying "Read more here" Also try changing your link text to "Read more here" and make it stand out of the other text like making it ...


1

You're raising an interesting point, but there may be more going on than a lack of familiarity with using the web. How did you observe the huge chunk of users in India interacting with links and what they do and don't understand? The specific content and layout of the page also may have some effect, and then it's possible that users do understand that there ...


0

I think the needs of the particular audience outweigh general design principles. For example, if designing an interface for visually impaired people, you would probably make the fonts thicker, have larger buttons, and use a theme with more contrast. Hence, if your audience is more likely to interact with the "click here" links you should use those. You ...


3

Yes, it's good to inform users ...particularly if there are mixed links on the page (some open in new tabs and some don't). One popular way to denote new-tab links inline is to use an icon as follows: If you're developing using CSS, this can be done in a way that fails gracefully for text-only or accessibility browsers. You can insert an :after sprite, ...


2

I think if the link will be redirecting to a different site, then it's helpful to convey this information to the user by means of an icon. The second icon in the question is apt for such cases. If the link will be redirecting to same site on the domain, then opening the link in new tab is not required. For plain text links, a small icon just next to the ...


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All are suitable ways however if your highering in the engineering community or where english may not be someones first language maybe some sort of visual representations could help non native english speakers especially if its slipped in. Heres some results i liked when I googled hiring icons really great no words to get confused here also a fan of ...


1

It would depend what the main purpose of your site is, and are your users of the product the type of people you are looking to hire? If you are a web design blog, looking to hire web designers then I would give it more importance (up at the top, big and bold, multiple locations throughout the site). An example would be Metalab who are an agency, and ...


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Well, everything is almost right and wrong, and especially in www you can decide if something is right or wrong, based on user's needs and goals (although this could be a general life approach:) By the way, keep in mind implementation complexity and time. But let me give you an example based on your resources. You have a "company-thing" like Frank Chimero's ...


0

I don't think it should be the norm, it feels rushed or forgotten. I've noticed users prefer simply clicking hyperlinked emails over filling out basic email forms containing first name, last name, email. This is based on usability tests I've conducted on contact pages ranging from websites with 500-100k users. This led me to believe that most users prefer ...


4

It is not a pattern - it is an error and poor usability. You have shown a pathological examples. Both elements looks like menu item, not an e-mail address. In this two cases what should happen is opening contact page, not e-mail. Affordance tels us that - this elements are percieved as items in menu which open some pages. If they do not do that, user has ...


2

The information you're providing isn't very descriptive of the complete scenario, but based on it, it sounds like you're describing a situation where you have users and a superuser or admin. If this is the case, it's quite common to display only the available options for their level of access. This being said, you have two choices here: if you don't care ...


1

Maybe the solution here is not to emphasise whether the links are internal or external but to properly categorise the content and purpose of the link targets. "Useful Links" is too broad to give the user any real clue as to why they should look there. Also, in my experience, areas that lack proper definition in a website soon become dumping grounds for ...


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These symbols are fairly standard across the internet, obviously hover is an issue for touch - I don't know whether this is a consideration for you?


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Are you asking for a technical or UX solution here? UPDATE: Very curious why someone has voted this question down. The question appears to be one a UX-sided one, however, it is really not clear. Esp. because a technical solution would be very simple.


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Even just 5 years ago there's likely be strong consensus that links are for navigation, buttons for interacting with data. But you won't find that consensus today at all. Today you're as likely to find a button for navigation as a link to interact with data. And that's OK as long as thought was put into it so that it is usable for your target audience. I ...


3

Power users open links in new tabs and rarely use the Back button, while most users rarely open links in new tabs and rely on the Back button instead. Patrick Dubroy conducted this study for his master’s thesis while working at Mozilla. You can read about the presentation that he gave there and the paper that he wrote for CHI. In describing his ...



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