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7

There has been a lot of research on this topic since the 1980s and a lot of it still holds true today. One study from the 1980s states this: However, most studies have shown that dark characters on a light background are superior to light characters on a dark background (when the refresh rate is fairly high). For example, Bauer and Cavonius (1980) found ...


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Computer vision syndrome expert Dr. James Sheedy: "The best color combination for your eyes is black text on a white background, though other dark-on-light combinations also work well." SOURCE: http://www.allaboutvision.com/cvs/irritated.htm (independent source of trustworthy information on eye health) Personally for me light text on dark background ...


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There is a tool for checking color contrast in accordance to an specification by the W3C to determine if there's enough contrast "when viewed by someone having color deficits or when viewed on a black and white screen". This is a working draft but as close a standard as it gets in web. In this case, you should test the contrast between the different colors ...


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There is no definitive answer to that question. There are so many things that are outside of your control and/or knowledge as a designer that you can't have a "rule" to say how far apart two RGB-color-values have to be. Some things to consider: Quality, type and settings (brightness and such) of your computer screen affect this a lot (check out Atwood's ...


1

For me, a dark background in a dark room or a bright background in a bright room is ideal. Bright rooms causes the eye to let less light in, making dark backgrounds and the little bright letters even darker. As for the dark room: being able to see the rest of the room is important for me to be able to look away from the screen now and then. Have a look at ...


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Two things that can make this an "it depends" issue are environment and visual impairment. Using an app at night might make lighter text on a dark background better. For example, I find it less straining (and certainly less annoying to my wife) to use a dark background reading e-books in bed). Someone needing to preserve night vision or security, such as ...


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You may be talking about strain and not personal taste. One thing I know, though, is that it is somewhat physically painful to look at themes that have dark backgrounds with extremely bright (high brightness and saturation) foreground icons/text. If you choose dark backgrounds, lessen the brightness and saturation but make it still readable without effort. ...


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People are naturally attracted to glossy items goes back to the human need to find water. By making something glossy you will normally increase the appeal as a result. Although I see what you mean by user experience but actually the eyes issue is down to other factors which affect the way the eyes work.


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The answer has nothing to do with UI. People buy shiny stuff regardless of usability, it is as simple as that. The idea that it provides better contrast is a myth. Transflective screens provide better contrast but they are not glossy.


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The reason why people buy glossy screens instead of matte ones is that the glossy screens show a bigger color range and the contrast is higher (the dark areas can show more details for example). It is however a downside to them, they reflect more background lights. http://www.tweakandtrick.com/2012/06/matte-and-glossy-monitors-clear.html


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My understanding is that the glossy displays had better contrast, and were therefore better for watching movies. I never liked glossy displays, though, since I spend very little time watching movies on my laptop. Interestingly, my LCD TV is not glossy...


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As Chris suggested, the two eyes work together. Remember, vision is not a property of one eye; the vision is a joint effort between both eyes, the nerves and the brain. Since the eyes are generally focused in one area, they work together and the brain joins the two images into one, like a panorama setting on a camera. In that way, you are basically designing ...


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It makes a huge difference whether this is about adjacent colors (which include background-foreground contrasts) or non-adjacent colors. Our eyes are very sensitive to perceiving a difference between adjacent colors. But we're very poor at recognizing a non-adjacent match. Color differences in adjacent colors can be expressed in delta-E. 1 delta-E is the ...



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