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Use icons when people know what you mean Icons for expected actions aren't a bad thing. They will save space, but they aren't technically the most "minimal" solution — that would be text, since you remove the extra layer of translation. Don't violate expectations If you do go with icons, you need to make sure they are the expected ones. Yours are ...


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A reported 47% of signups can come from the home page, Sidebar area and exit popup while at the bottom of your content can be up to 73% effective. Here is my source. I believe your answers are there. Home Page 47% Pop-Ups 47% In Content 47% Main Navigation 47% Timed pop-up 13% Bottom 73% Sidebar 47% Exit Pop- Up 47% Content Upgrades ...


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The approach would be to put it in a hidden div with text which can be read by screen readers only but wont be visible to people without Visual impairments. To quote this webaim article Positioning content off-screen The following are the recommended styles for visually hiding content that will be read by a screen reader. .hidden ...


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First, you can add a message that is invisible to all but screen readers. But I believe that you should really mark the container with aria-live.


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Perhaps an audio feedback like 'The list has been reordered' would be suitable? Audio information is a perfectly acceptable form of feedback for visual impaired users and they generally are used to it and value it. On a separate note, if the users are blind or visually impaired your UI is problematic by the looks of things. I can identify that bin and the ...


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"Chosen" seems like a reasonable solution (http://harvesthq.github.io/chosen/). It uses JQuery to build UI from your existing select/option elements so fails gracefully back to a standard select.


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You can try dividing the screen into two scrollable sections. something similar to a date picker ?


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The problem with drag-and-drop is that you can't be sure about the user recognizing this a functionality. If you provide some kind of "first time tutorial", and the lists tend to fit in the screen, it's the best option. Comparing d&d with the arrows, the latter are more intuitive but also more tedious because of the number of taps that might be ...


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Long click and drag seems to be the best solution. One or two below: If you have a long list - long click and scrolling list as a background with clicked element above. For short list - long click and drag. Also consider clicking - icon on the right side indicating, that you can change order. After click moving up / down is activted. I'd consider some ...


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1. Limit inputs to things that are required It should be very clear to your users why they are being asked to input anything on a form. I assume you are already doing this and there are still just too many inputs that different users may want to use on your very large form. In that case, consider putting all required inputs up top and then grouping ...



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