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You could use a compare by feature/item view, where: Each screen contains one package You can navigate between packages by dragging screen left/right You can see how each package measures in comparison to the others per feature/item, via an icon You can hide/reveal features/items that are/aren't important to you You can reorder features/items according to ...


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How are the packages set up? If you have some leverage in the product design of the packages, knowing that they'd be bought on a smartphone, then you could think about streamlining. A good example of could be: Package 1 | $30 4 Apples 1 Bunch bananas 1 Bunch grapes Package 2 | $40 Package 1 Plus: 4 pears Fruit wash Package 3 | $45 Package 2 ...


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You're asking how to make it extremely obvious, so you could write Click to select other dates into the textfield. E.g. 24 August, 2014 (click to select other dates)


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If you want it to be extremely obvious, that the user should click on the button to select a date, I suggest you add a label to the button or replace the icon with a label. The label could say something like "Change Date", or maybe just "Change" or "Select," given that it follows a text control that already contains a date.


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By virtue of having a control which resembles a text field and a button, you have already provided the user with something he or she knows can be clicked. I would also suggest adding placeholder text ('Enter a date...' perhaps?) rather than a default date to prevent the user from assuming that the default date is unchangeable.


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You want help text to be placed where the user has a question (e.g., “How do I apply this message to all the emails I’ve listed?”). You also want a control to be placed where the user is ready to activate it (e.g., “I’ve written my message and entered my emails, now I want to apply the message to all the emails.”). It follows that, in a properly laid out ...


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Setting a max length for the fields would be advisable rather than changing the size depending upon the longest entry in a database. For instance, the "Contact name" field can be set to a maximum size of 200 characters. This would help stabilize the alignment of the form that you set. However, if that is not possible, you can use the, "one field per row" ...


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By 'html entity' I'm guessing you mean an icon, please correct me or update your question if I am mistaken. If I am right, then you want to distinguish an admin icon from a normal user icon. Therefore whatever icon you use for a normal user, if you take that and couple it with a key or badge icon, it could represent a more advanced version of a user e.g. ...


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I suppose the purpose is to distinguish admin users from normal users in a list of users or in some presentation where different user names may appear. There is no symbol reserved for this purpose, so you need to choose a method suitable for the rendering context, using something that indicates some user names as “more important” or “more powerful”. The ...


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You can use the # symbol which is the command prompt that superusers/root get by default in many Unix-like shells (including Linux, MacOSX, and Android). Another possible alternative, assuming that your users might have visited one of stackexchange websites is the diamond symbol ♦ that is used here for community moderators. As far as I can tell, there is ...


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As per my knowledge, html entity for admin kind of icon search is fruitless effort. However, I would recommend to use font awesome for such interface presentation using Unicode;  Btw, use CSS code that sets font-family: FontAwesome and font-style: normal on the i element. http://fortawesome.github.io/Font-Awesome/cheatsheet/ Hope this helps in ...


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I guess it depends on what you are trying to leverage out of Bootstrap or similar Development Frameworks the most. One advantage about the popularity of Bootstrap is that there are plenty of people customizing it, and you can find many things on github, CodePen or jsfiddle that will probably address the things that you find lacking in the basic UI components ...


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Without a delay just moving your mouse around would accidentally make popups appear and flicker across your screen. That'd draw users' attention away from what they're doing if they didn't expect it, and probably annoy them because flickering stuff provides no value to them: it's unlikely they wanted to read the title and unlikely they even have the time to ...


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Personally, I always include the search result count in the heading. Users navigating by outline/headings (a feature often offered by screen readers) get more, and possibly relevant, information before they have to jump to that section and start reading how many results there are. WCAG 2.0 The relevant guideline is 2.4.6 Headings and Labels (level AA): ...


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I assume the accessibility report is looking at that aspect only, as such it would be right, dynamic headers are not a good experience for screen readers as they use the H's to navigate. In addition to the above I'm going to reform my answer. It stands to reason that someone with impaired vision, using a screen reader would need the H tag to navigate, this ...


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The most effective placeholder text I've seen is on the Polar sign up form. The placeholder text is an explanation of why the field is there or what the requirements for the field are. I can think of a couple reasons for this: Most people already know what a "First Name" is without you giving them an example. We don't expect to see full sentences in ...


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I do not know what your page looks like, but I cannot really imagine a scenario where embedding PDF's which I am assuming are at least a page of solid text each ends up as anything but something annoying that the user wishes they did not have to look at. I would say that you should provide links that describe what is in each PDF, and then let the user use ...



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