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You should realize that there might be very specific reasons why those arrows are placed where they are on the screen, and those reasons might not fit with your purpose. The other thing is that without a sensible scale or idea of the number of items and the exact frequency and context of usage, it will be hard to determine what the optimal option might be ...


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Well, I'd go with your 3rd option, only that on the right. Since most people is right handed, that will prevent your users have to go across your element every time they want to interact with it. And having your buttons close together requires minimum effort to scroll up and down. I did a very quick sample to visually explain the concept and how you reduce ...


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There is a jQuery plugin for Like button, which has lots of themes: https://likebtn.com/en/jquery-like-button There is also a jQuery plugin for Comments, which looks like it has additional features like upvoting: http://viima.github.io/jquery-comments/ In both cases, the like feature is small so will not take much space, but the comments are likely to be ...


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I work with a number of teams. The only term I've heard used with any frequency is ... "Visual QA" For the record, this isn't technically a UX thing. If your UX team also handles the final product design, then it falls in their court. But it's definitely something for the product / brand / visual design role to confirm.


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There isn't a formal UX terminology for what you are describing, although some people would call this a Design Review. Where this fits in the development process will depend on the development methodology. For example, if you are following any of the Agile development methodologies, you start each Sprint by showing the team what you want them to build ...


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Sometime we call it "UX Review" and sometimes we call it a "Build Review" since we're reviewing both the styling of UI elements and UX functionality in a product's current build.



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