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This answer assumes that the interaction you're after is browsing, and not searching, as other answers have alluded to. There is already a pattern for such an interaction, used in the iPhone contacts lists, and utilized in this answer to a similar question about long lists. I've taken the concept and added the idea that when you jump to a letter, you get ...


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Depending on the type of user the solution would vary: User searching for a song of his choice : In this scenario, what DripDrop (below) mentioned about just in time lookup would be a right choice. User is exploring the songs and is not looking for something particular : In this case you can add another level of pagination e.g if I am in [b] then [<< ...


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Try making something similar to Windows explorer's search, where you start typing the song name, and it completes the list based on the closest matches. Some optional ideas is to make the system update less times if the system is slower (low ram, less than 4 cores, etc.), or to make an algorithm to pick songs to update the songs according to the recently ...


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Most of the answers I see here are geared more toward print than the web. Reading printed materials is different than reading on the web. As far as text sizes go, instead of using fixed font sizes, you should always let users decide with defaults they have set in their browsers. 1.5 is a good, readable line height when reading text on a screen. This ...


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"All" option to the left of the "#" would be an easy fix. If you're thinking about adding more advanced functionallity in the future - namely multiple selection, consider doing it this way: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I really like this option for complex filters.


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It is a long standard that every top level link should present a page with the name of the link and that page should present the next level of sub links. This continues for each level. The content on those pages should contain and overview of of the pages each link will present A bread crumb trail below the nav bar is also very good for people who prefer ...


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The solution is to have an outer table with a single cell per row and then within that cell have a form which contains another table with only a single row where each row contains all your input and grayed fields along with both buttons. ...or you could do it with javascript where your buttons run clientside scripts to gather their associated fields and ...


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Consider using "badges" on tabs with an error: http://getbootstrap.com/components/#badges (Even if you're not using Bootstrap, the concept is still relevant.) This is a very popular technique, used by many major websites and apps, to prompt users to click on something because they want to investigate what the unread message is. Of course, you'll want to ...


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Well formatted markup will not necessarily present information in the order that a person would expect it. For years I've placed the navigation at the bottom and the primary text at the top (within the HTML) and used CSS to place the nav where I wanted to. SEO people I talk to still consider that to be a good practice. I think that looking at your page w/o ...


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The W3C answer to this is a strong "yes". They consistently advocate separation of semantic and presentation concerns, and if that is done rigorously, then unstyled HTML should make visual sense, because the default behaviors for paragraphs, definition lists, captions etc. are designed to make visual sense. The point is not so much that people will have ...


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Generally speaking if you are coding semantically your unstyled page will be clear. Browsers apply default properties to elements like h1, p, legend etc. Pseudo elements (:before and :after content) is usually not desirable for accessibility - think screen readers. Unless you have a specific use case for unstyled content then you can safely ignore it along ...



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