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1

I can say that for non-touch interfaces, the hover action is more of a perceived affordance because we've been so used to it on the web. Mostly, users don't know when to hover but they actually do perceive it. According to the Hover invitation pattern, we can use hover to cue the user what is going to happen next. Here's an interesting article by Bill Scott ...


1

There is generally no way for a user to know if they can reveal something by hovering. More important, there is no way to hover on the vast majority of touch screen devices. This means that hover-and-drop-down menus for instance are completely unusable. I have this problem for years trying to access connection requests on LinkedIn on my phone. You can't ...


5

Big companies can get away with a lack of hovering, because they invent the standard for others to follow in. Take Facebook for example. Half the links there aren't advertised as links. There's just so much data on a page that they can get away with providing links to pages with zero guidance. People look forward to a standard they can use.. but most ...


11

They don’t! As web applications are more and more packed with information, the need to hide controls have emerged. The option would be to have even longer web pages, showing a lot of redundant controls for every post as in "unfollow post, unfollow updates from user X, unlike page, still like page but don't show updates, and on and on and on. This has made ...


1

The share and save links are fine because: Icons/Buttons alongside text. Knowledge of word meaning and standardised placement of links makes it an intuitive location to put them. Good colours away from the standard text colours of the page. Why the heading for the 'element' is not so good: Same colour, styles (and size?) as the top header Image ...


0

Personally I think you may be over-engineering this as based on your question it seems you are concerned about indicating a data-point is clickable and user not knowing the information they will receive when clicking on that data-point. Short answer for this question is style them as links (as essentially that's what they are). Based on the premise of the ...


0

A table like this on a cellular phone that is not a phablet or tablet is difficult to read no matter how you choose to indicate a link; A clear message on top could do it but this would fail the guideline that if you need instructions its not an easy to use interface. You could also use any type of tutorial or message here and fall in the same case. If the ...


0

This might be a good application of animations. What if on pageload a finger-cursor icon briefly appears and moves in a curve, diagonally over the cells. As the finger passes over each cell, that cell grows/shrinks, or a drop shadow fades in/out, or whatever other state you might use on mouseover to indicate clickablity on desktop. If the animation is ...


0

I suppose this is a web page that can be seen even from the mobile. Normally a user is used in furniture that all you see is clickable. In a table like this that we are showing I believe that the addition of any icon would make the interface suffered heavy. But you have instead tried to tackle the problem differently? If you said explicitly it with a ...


2

I've worked for several media and newspaper companies in London... top of the list would be Guardian, Daily Mail, Metro and Local World. Their digital newspapers thrive on the revenue from Ads and they do invest and spend quite a bit of money into getting these Ads into their web pages. At one of these newspapers, I had to put my foot down and scream some ...


0

All forms of hover over (except for minor effects) are considered bad usability these days. Increasingly people are accessing the internet with touch screen devices where a hover over is impossible. As for advertising...with the rise of ad blockers and people just plain becoming used to ads on the internet big flashy tricks to draw them in are no longer the ...


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Is hover the only way you can find out that information? Would someone on a tablet, or someone using keyboard without a mouse be able to find that full information without having to select that item fully? If hover is just one way to display it - an enhancement, so to speak - then it is OK. But if you have to use your mouse and hover over the item in order ...


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As always it depends. The reason it's not a best practice is because a hover state can be attained in multiple unintended ways, including scrolling as in the example you listed. In the case of Netflix, they undoubtedly knew the consequences. That's likely why the hover state has such a short timer before activating, as well as why each tile only expands ...



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