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25

Looking through both the "Home button vs Logo link?" and "Should I add a 'Home' Button to the navigation?" questions on UX SE, the information in both is still quite relevant even though some of it is two years old or more. "Relevant" doesn't mean there's a clear-cut answer, and really there isn't going to be a clear-cut answer applicable to all. I don't ...


19

It heavily depends on the site content and architecture. I believe it is very dangerous to try and make conclusions using statistics "on average" (moreover, I'm not sure such statistics even exist). In my experience no matter how well your site is indexed and how many good entry points there are, it is always better to have a home page than not to have one. ...


12

Some hard reasons against videos: Videos require sound. This is not appropriate - or even feasible - in some scenarios. Videos take over control. I can't reliably skip a paragraph, read thoroughly or across - it's your pacing, not mine Videos usually offer no navigation. The goal of your home page should be for visitors to quickly find what they are ...


11

Some actual data that may help you make up your mind on this. In June 2011 the web consulting firm ProMediaCorp did a study of the top 500 websites (as defined by Alexa) and found that: Of the websites checked, 37.4% of them link to the homepage in their site navigation, while 62.6% do not. Now, just because the majority of major sites don't include ...


10

It's not published anywhere, but when I was at university I had to do a small usability study. For the sites tested, I did observe significant attempts to return to the home page corresponding with user frustration, particularly in users with mental handicaps such as dyslexia -- often they would fail to notice that something was clickable where neurotypical ...


9

Which one is the main point for each website depends on what strategy best suits their particular interest, product(s), and service(s). There is no universal purpose. Some of the more common purposes for a home page are: A portal entry point to direct you to other content (e.g. youtube) An introduction to your company and what you do (e.g. most ...


8

There aren't really any "guidelines" but there's a lot of information floating around about what designs are good for conversion. You can learn a lot from abtests.com, which often talks about changes made to a product homepage that have led to an increase in sales. Best practices I've come across and applied to the design of my product's promotional site: ...


7

37Signals did an amazing job with Highrise. They've been testing the signup page using different designs and sharing the results. http://37signals.com/svn/posts/1525-writing-decisions-headline-tests-on-the-highrise-signup-page http://37signals.com/svn/posts/2977-behind-the-scenes-highrise-marketing-site-ab-testing-part-1 ...


7

Even if your navigation is the most perfect one, you do need a homepage, because the homepage is the one that serves these cases: Users type the URL/domain name directly. Your loyal readers/clients may remember your domain and type it in directly, or find it in your business card and type it in. As a corollary: When a user types a simple word in the ...


7

one thing: When you see a print magazine on the shelf, obviously the cover page varies from month to month, however, enough stays constant that you can recognize the same magazine from one month to the next and that's how it should be - enough difference to show flair and variation, and avoid stagnation, but similar enough to provide consistency and ...


7

I've been working for years as web designer/developer in a communication company. From experience I can tell you that a well done smart video is better than anything to explain concepts in briefs and reaching the point. For your doubt: "I am uncomfortable with the expectation that users will play the video at all without an introduction or explanation ...


7

An A/B test experiment can help determine the answer since it can go either way depending on the type of users on your site and the type of 'conversion' you're referring to (purchased, view product detail, sign up for account..etc). My assumption is that adding the product category will encourage the users to click on category and view more related ...


7

You should offer both. For people who dont have patience to watch 60 sec long movie, will simply scroll the page down and look at screenshots with feature visualization. If that persons get interest in your project, they will take time to watch the movie to get the full explanation of you product. On the other side there are people who are typical TV ...


6

Video is an "elephant in the china store". When I go to a company web site's main page I expect: navigation bar on the top or left side, search box in the header, mostly on the right side, a short description of the company, what the heck they are (e.g. is it an ATL agency or a bike shop or whatsoever?), some bullshit (story of the company), title and head ...


6

I'm not sure about affective (did you mean "effective"?), but we can definitely identify a common, even standard, design pattern for one-product websites. Here are a few examples: Square, Doxie, Feedly, Highlight, Dollar Shave Club. As far as I understand, the main principles for one-product websites are: Product in front - These websites use big images ...


6

The landing page of your site is a chance to grab people's attention with something that they are likely looking for. You are choosing to not grab their attention with anything, and when you don't demonstrate why staying is interesting, people will leave. As it stands now, your landing page amounts to a menu. I don't see anything that you are gaining by ...


5

I'll be a contrarian. If used properly, there is a place for video on the front page. I do not mean a flashy flash logo with blinking lights dancing around the page, or even worse a self-playing abomination as a landing page. Think of the user experience of one of your likely visitors: "I know we want a e-learning solution, but I know nothing about this ...


5

It's not a scientific reason by any means, but the reason I always give when presented with this is that users absolutely hate that sort of thing. Not as much as they hate a splash screen before they are taken to the real site, but it is a close second. Unfortunately, I don't have a link to a specific study on this, but my testing has always shown that ...


5

Take a look at Stack Overflow Careers. The main page clearly indicates it's for job seekers and there is a fairly prominent "for employers" link which takes you to the employers page. This is clear who the target audience is and again has a link back to the job seekers page. So - who are going to be the majority of your users? If there is a clear ...


5

There was a good discussion on this in another thread and the consensus was that it still bore relevance in usability and that it should stay. For your particular case, however, it might be instructive to add a ?ref= param to your logo and home button link and look at your analytics to determine what your site visitors are actually doing. You might be ...


5

I would suggest adding the two logos as a separate navigation and the "home button" to take you to the home of the Company page you are in. That way the user will identify that there are 2 different pages and each one has its unique navigation structure. i.e.


5

All the examples you have quoted are examples of parallax sites which use shifting content to tell and story and keep the user engaged.I am going to break this response into three parts. The reasoning I would recommend looking at this article for additional inputs on how parallax sites keep users engaged. Storytelling Parallax scrolling offers ...


5

Why shouldn't clicking the logo reload the page? A link that does nothing seems like more of a UI problem than a link that reloads the same page. If a page has any time related content like feeds that do not auto-refresh, just like the question list pages on this site it would be very ill-advised not to refresh the page when the logo is clicked. Even when ...


4

User photos are definetly a good conversion strategy. Upsides: User sees there are other users User can be compelled to join by getting interested in a certain profile Registered user may see it as a promotion and give them fame Downsides: You will need to keep a close look at which photos appear, that they are not unappropiate and that they don't ...


4

Ideally you wouldn't need a "how it works" section at all. Using the right design cues to make it clear what you can do on the site, supported by appropriate copy, will help the user understand what the site does. Like a user manual, the "how this site works" section will be the last resort for most people. If you do need to have this section, keep it short ...


4

Yes, there is evidence that in some situations, long landing pages (essentially what you described) have a significantly higher conversion rate. In short, removing other decision options gets a person to scroll down and actually see more of your site than they would have if they have to actively select each page that they want to see. This has consistently ...


4

If you have a version of your website designed for mobile, you should redirect mobile devices to that version. You should not redirect to the mobile app however (meaning an app store), as you are then taking someone away from their chosen destination without their input. It's a good assumption that someone on a mobile device will want to see the content ...


4

If you want to show off products, it is better to show it as a list. Some reasons why the list is a better choice than a carousel: If user wants to compare products, it is easier (compared to carousel) to scroll up and down and see what the differences are. They are controlling the scroll and not the script moving the image. If a user wants to go through ...


4

Redirecting the user on the home page is confusing as he didn't ask for it when validating. The most expected behavior is to let him on the setting page, with a success message ('your settings have been updated') and maybe an option to revert the modifications. The thing to consider here is that the user will have to check if his new settings are correct ...


4

According the opinion that carousels are evil and one should not use them, regardless of what the customer thinks, the conclusion is: "Longer is better". The ideal time is "infinity" (i.e. don't use carousel). If you are forced to use some finite time, then make is as longer as possible without getting fired.



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