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128

It is a skeumorphic depiction of notching, indicating that the area can be pulled/dragged. Similar to the notching on the end of the gun slide (providing extra grip to the fingers). This appeared as early as Windows 98 (see the bottom right corner of window). Edit: This is not unique to guns, but more of an industrial design technique. See here the ...


93

While Bowen's gun example is decent, an even better example would be the back of your TV remote control (or many other devices that store batteries under a slide cover): The notching on the pistol, the battery cover, and plenty of other everyday items are primarily to provide extra friction/grip for your fingers, while also pointing out the best place to ...


72

I believe the going name for it is a Hamburger Menu, as a reference to the icon that's commonly used for it (, similar to the Unicode character ≡ U+2261 Identical To), and to the stacked nature of the drawer itself. Hamburger Drawer and Hamburger Sidebar would also be recognizable terms to the UX community. A bit of discussion on what I believe to be the ...


68

It's a stylised form of the '1' and the '0' for 'On' and 'Off'. You can see the evolution here.


30

This symbol is comprised of a 1, indicating "on", and a 0, indicating "off". It was originally designed to indicate "standby", or a low power state that was neither truly on or off. At that time, a 1 inside of a 0 was the power symbol. On December 8, 2004, IEEE 1621 designated the former standby symbol as the new power symbol and designated a waning ...


21

Side panel As mentioned at appadvice The app features a pretty slick interface, and uses the side panel for navigation.


20

To add to the existing excellent answers. This type of design feature is known as an affordance (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affordance). Notched or textured surfaces are used in real life objects to suggest they can be gripped or pushed by a finger, and this has been adopted as a skeuomorphism in computer UIs. Here's a screen-shot of Java Swing's ...


18

The layout pattern itself (not the burger icon) is known as 'Off Canvas'. Luke Wroblewski wrote about it in an article about Multi-Device Layout Patterns. ...the Off Canvas pattern for multi-device layout takes advantage of space off the screen to keep content or navigation hidden until either a larger screen size allows it to be visible or a user ...


18

I find it glaring that the sound of the letter 'X' (ex) is the same as the opening sound in experience, whereas the letter 'E' sounds like the start of international. So I think that sound-wise, UX is closer to User Experience than UE. Just to support this: Extra large is marked 'XL' and not 'EL'. Also, the sound of UE (U-yi) reminds of GUI (Gu-yi) and ...


15

Peter Merholz actually did a very thorough investigation into the term "User Experience". http://www.peterme.com/index112498.html It looks like the earliest recorded usage was meeting notes from 1993 by a colleague of Donald Norman's at Apple. The notes imply that Norman changed the job title "User Interface Architect" to "User Experience Architect". Norman ...


11

To expound on what @matt_d_rat wrote, There's a great write-up here about this, but it was originally designed by Norm Cox for the Xerox Star workstation in 1981! This icon is about as old as the concept of GUI itself! To see it in action check out this video and skip to around 21 minutes.


11

While only conjecture and not supported by any evidence, this article makes a pretty good case for the evolution of the standby button: http://designblog.nzeldes.com/2008/05/the-evolution-of-the-onoff-power-switch-symbol/ The short version is that as rocker or toggle switches were replaced by momentary push-button switches the I / O symbols were merged to ...


10

I think you have too quickly ruled out the most intuitive option. Humans are especially good at recognizing faces, and I think you might be surprised how well you can represent the nine different states with 32x32 smileys. For example, take a look at this group of smileys: http://gas13.ru/v3/pixelart/smilies_by_gas13.png or very simply: ...


10

According to the android developer site it's known as a Navigation Drawer. source: http://developer.android.com/training/implementing-navigation/nav-drawer.html


10

Via further research, I've discovered that I was acting under a bad assumption. I had assumed that 0 and 1 became standard around the same time, but the very next section in the wikipedia article says: The 0 key was added and standardized in its modern position early in the history of the typewriter, but the 1 and exclamation point were left off some ...


8

The reason you sit on the outside of the car (on the right when driving on the left hand side of the road in the UK or on the left when driving on the right as in the US) is so you can more easily see oncoming traffic. This is especially important if you want/need to overtake the vehicle in front. If you are sitting on the nearside you'll find it very ...


7

1. UE was used before UX This is the first recorded instance of "User Experience" as a job role that I could find and it came from an Apple document from 1995... This office has introduced a new procedure for products, which starts with the creation of a "User Experience Requirements Document" (UERD). -- source: Don Norman, Jim Miller, Austin ...


6

A simpler approach that more users would understand would be to tell the user when they last logged in. Most users won't understand IP address (unless you have a very technical audience). Alternatively, you could display when the user last logged in, and if they select "Tell me more", explain about IP addresses and then display the information - but again - ...


6

Out of a related discussion which started on Quora, Geoff Alday dug a little deeper into the origins of the icon itself and discovered that Norm Cox is the man credited with designing the icon for the Xerox Star personal workstation, which was introduced in 1981. In an e-mail conversation between Cox and Alday, Cox reveals how the icon came about and the ...


6

Other answers have adequately addressed the skeuomorphic inspiration for this convention, but since the question also asked about history, let's look at that a bit. I'd nominate Macintosh System 7.0 (1991, but I vaguely recall the UI style being widely previewed before then) as the originator of this convention... you see the ridging in active scroll bar ...


4

The "#" fragment URL is the standard way to indicate a location on a page and the history management for that is already build into the browser (basic example). The lightbox state could also be encoded in hash fragment URLs, I think this is standard enough behavior that wouldn't pose any usability problems.


4

Nice graphics ;) Your questions is interesting and hard to answer in detail. I think your way of solving the mood states by colour is good and understandable for people, because there is a direct combination of colours and their perception in terms of feelings. I wouldn't use arrows in the circle, because this is a kind of very abstract concept. You have ...


4

37signals has a great example of how you can make this interesting for the user and help them understand your story. No offense to the HR professional who commented (though, it wouldn't be the first time I've offended HR), a history page that starts with the present is probably too much about what you want to say. Your current achievements are, hopefully, ...


4

I too want to add an image: My thought is (Speculation also) is that it has to do with QWERTY, Most of the QWERTY layout was to prevent keybinding. I have to wonder if having it in 0``1``2 cause binding issues and was thus moved to the end where one could not cause a binding issue. 1011 comes to mind as a touchy combo.


4

Your priority metric should be chronological significance - this depends greatly your context. Is it more important for the user to see the oldest items or newest first. Timelines on social media sites place significance upon what is happening 'now': 'What are my friends doing? Is my sister online? Are we partying tonight?' Units of work are generally ...


3

I can see situations where your time based approach would work well, but there are also some problems with it (besides any technical challenges). Most people are used to the standard tree for undo, and with your changing of it, they may become confused as to why it works differently. Undoing something signifies that it was a mistake. With your time based ...


3

Side Navigation is one proposed term, as stated here: http://www.androiduipatterns.com/2012/06/emerging-ui-pattern-side-navigation.html It's a worth-while reading, which explains why this bring innovation to the navigation mechanisms of apps. It also lists other candidate terms: Fly-in app menu Slide out navigation Sliding navigation bar Slide menu


3

I think it depends on what service you are running to whether it is advantageous to show those details to users. With most services, I'd say that it is probably unnecessary. However, if you are building a service that needs to have added security controls, it can become handy. Say you have a service that stores business details for people inside the ...


3

I would not use colors alone for displaying the moods, since a 2-d color scale would be much less intuitive than a standard 1-d scale. Also, you have to keep in mind that colors can have different meanings in different countries and cultures. See: http://webdesign.about.com/od/colorcharts/l/bl_colorculture.htm Our congnition is very capable of ...


3

The first record (I could find) on User Experience comes from Mark Twain’s “Nineteen rules governing literary art in domain of romantic fiction” written in 1895. These 19 rules could easily be transferred to writing for the web today which is a part of User Experience. Here are some of them: (1) That a tale shall accomplish something and arrive ...



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