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25

Two things I'd recommend: Have a conversation with them and find out how passionate they are about what they do. This is a good indicator for whether someone's a good hire for any industry, but specifically, you want to gauge how well they're involved and up to speed with events. I find people who know what's going on, what's new, what's cutting edge and ...


15

Ask them to complete a small task. Here is how I was tested a few years ago. I think this was taken from a NNgroup workshop. Task: Sandwich Choice UI This is a web interface for choosing sandwiches. Users are busy office workers on their lunch break. List the issues with this UI. Redesign the interface. Feel free to use any kind of controls (links, ...


14

Popups are good as long as: a) they're not obtrusive b) you can easily dismiss them (the Stack Exchange model is to dismiss them by clicking anywhere on the popup itself) c) the user has some way of turning them off permanently. This could be either through a configuration switch or, as in the case of Stack Exchange, they disappear once you reach a ...


7

There are quite a few ways to communicate below the fold content. The most natural way I have seen is just have content overflow the fold, so some part of it is visible while some is missing. This just tells you there is stuff down there. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If you are dealing with plain text, ...


6

I'd wouldn't use green and red into that fashion, because red tends to portray the feeling that whatever it's logged it has gone wrong. I'd use something like this instead: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups for inputs download bmml source for outputs The arrow pointing in an out of the icon indicates I/O ...


5

Make sure to decide what kind of person you want. A user researcher, someone who loves testing is not a designer. You can think of it as ... Do you want a scientist or an artist? Of course, you get a mix, but I find people really fall into one of those camps. (in my experience) If you need revolution, use an artist. If you need evolution, use a user ...


4

I do agree that users will tend to scroll regardless of any indication, however if you still want to use any sort of indication, this is way I suggest. The fold is a good idea when you have a fixed screen, however, the apple products have now many screen sizes (iphone5 and the ipad)so it will be harder to calculate the grid. Is possible to do, just have ...


4

That boucing stuff is scary. The user is never going to expect that on first time and it is useless when they get used to your application. I cannot prove that idea is not going to work though. I would propose you do something like this: The tiles are within a non ended canvas that suggest there is something else when scrolling. That said : I am pretty ...


3

Seeing how they work in action is definitely a good start. In addition, I'd recommend getting people who: Love testing Love learning Know best practices Know conventions and when, why, and how to break them Are creative enough to come up with new solutions when the problems merit it Aren't afraid to ask questions Have all the basics down: good eye for ...


2

First of all, your idea is good. Combine it with actually adding/changing stuff and you'll see how the person thinks and go on about creating stuff. In this process, one of the main things I'd do is try to discern if they (at least try to) truly understand the use cases and motivations behind the requests. Also, this link was recently posted in one of ...


2

I've interviewed for some UI co-ops and each time they had printed out a page or section of their application/website and said they wanted to add a new feature or whatever. They asked me to go through what I would do and and then once that was done, they showcased how they solved the problem. They asked for critiques and comparisons to my design. The best ...


2

You may be better served by offering a rollover tooltip that appears on hover after a delay rather than using a popup or dismissable tip. MooTools and jQuery both have multiple implementations, as do most JavaScript libraries. The advantages of a tooltip are that they are unobtrusive and progressively disclosed. The trick is finding a delay that isn't so ...


2

A few key behavioral-type questions ("Describe an actual situation in which you..."), in a phone screen before bringing them in for an interview. Not just basic knowledge, but how they think and work. Have them do some prepared design work prior to the interview which they then present to a group at the interview. Need to be able to communicate, persuade, ...


2

From the Windows Guidelines: Context menu: Do the following conditions apply: Is there a small set of contextual commands and options that apply to the selected object or window region? Are these menu items redundant? Are the target users familiar with context menus? If so, consider providing context menus for the objects and ...


1

Why not automatically suggest items as the user makes selections. I would locate the "Suggested Items" below the item selections similar to how Netflix suggests alternative titles once a user has viewed a title. Getting a good default will be important so use what you know about the user (behavior, preferences, profile) to drive the initial presentation. I ...


1

You are on the right track. You can do both. Is the contextual menu redundant? If not, I would make all those functions still available without using the contextual menu. This is rather important. Is there any reason why Zoom in/out/range functions are not available as buttons above the chart? If those functions are important, then they should be more ...


1

Forms are always tricky. You don't want them to be too long, because users hate long forms. In a e-commerce checkout procedure a long registration form can scare of 40% of your users (personal example). You also want the form to be clear enough to prevent frustration with your users. And most of all, you want the users to fly through your form in as little ...


1

That help text is definitely way too long. I'd simply offer some examples perhaps with a bit of help text: SEARCH: [ (enter a partial or full address) ] Examples: "12 5th Street, New York" or "Boston" or "98210" I think the key being the phrase 'partial or full'. I think that explains clearly that it doesn't need to be a ...


1

I think that popup with hints are good for novice users, when they start using new application, and don't know how to use it. But when they know, hints are not needed anymore, and only will be distraction. Maybe you could "bind" hints to functions, and when user used one function, then hint to that function should be turned off.


1

Most evidence I've seen suggests the user won't read them. If you need a popup to help users locate the functionality, the functionality is probably too hard to find. Focus on making feature X easier to find; if the user needs a popup to find it then the feature does not exist for 99% of users. "Tip of the Day" used to be a dialog seen in many desktop apps; ...



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