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33

Generally speaking, disruptions and distractions negatively affect human performance, a common finding in cognitive psychology. Many studies have shown that distraction greatly increases task time on a wide variety of tasks. There also exist many Quantitative studies showing task performance is negatively affected by distractions (note these figures are ...


27

As you rightfully pointed out there are a lot of articles which mention the increase in productivity levels. To quote this Computer Services Auckland Blog - Pulse IT Blog A University of Utah and ATI Technologies survey of 108 university & non university personnel using Dual Screen monitors reported increases of productivity with 33% fewer ...


20

The general rule of thumb for usability is to start off with no feedback, but to then display some busy indicator after 200ms, and if the process normally takes 5 seconds or more to present a larger feedback element (usually with a time elapsed timer, but preferably not with a progress bar unless you're very sure how long it will take). If something is ...


14

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


12

There are two psychological key aspects that are in play when it comes to this matter. Users want to feel as they are in control Users (people) want the ability to choose The I'm feeling lucky feature does not cater to either of these aspects. It is true that the user and the SEO will agree on the most suiting search result on a majority of the time. ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


11

Sometimes your users and frustrated but they don't know how to express it or they're too polite to do so. Their expression might show that they found that form annoying, even if they tell you it's great! In addition the "major" facial expressions have been found to be largely innate and not bound to cultures, in fact many animals display similar facial ...


10

One big advantage for software developers is that you can have your application running one one screen and your development environment running on the other. This means that there are hardly any issues when you have to switch your attention from one to the other. Having both things visible at a reasonable size at the same time makes it much easier and more ...


9

I tend to deliberately avoid the situation with a variety of alternatives, including, but not limited to the user and they. And in any case, it simplifies the issue a bit because once you use he or she you have to concern yourself with use of his, her, hers, etc. I am not alone: The Microsoft user experience guidelines is about 880 pages and refers to he ...


9

One situation of gameification that had poor results was Google Image Labeler. The premise was simple: in an effort to improve the quality of results from Google Image Search, two players were randomly paired and then shown an image. They had a time limit to create tags for the image and would score points if they had matching tags. The rationale was that by ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


7

The idea that Help is for beginners is misguided. Novices don’t use help; advanced users do. Novices don’t use help because: We are a victim of our own success. We’ve made apps and web sites that users can use without Help, so that’s what they expect. And, indeed, an app should be designed so that the average new user can be productive without opening help ...


7

Good question but a ticky one to answer :). Here would be my inputs considering I just broke into the HCI field a couple of years back or so: Understand that HCI is not about just graphic design or Information architecture or interaction design or user research. You could work as a developer and still have an active interest in human computer interactions ...


7

It's an updated version of waiting icons dating back to the first GUIs and browsers, which themselves are used to indicate either the system or application status. Cursor icons to indicate system status The Xerox Star workstation used an hourglass to indicate the machine is busy and unavailable for other activities. Changing the cursor was chosen to ...


7

I am wary of any solution where the user has to remember that inputting x really means y. If the "infinite" or "unlimited" state can't be unambiguously represented by the spinner control I would consider using another one specifically for the "unlimited mapping" use case. Perhaps have another checkbox for unlimited that, when selected, disables / greys out ...


6

I think designing for touch first could be a good general strategy for websites. It seems many designers, myself included, find it easier add features to an existing design than to remove them. So designing an application without assuming a pointer (the touch version), then adding pointer embellishments for the traditional computer version seems like it ...


6

I would suggest adding drag handles on each block and let the user decide the ordering. You'll only need to ensure that no matter the order of blocks, the first block will always be an if block and the remaining blocks- else if. Refer the image for more details This way the user will come to know upfront that the blocks are drag-able, both on desktop as ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


5

The obvious issue with the 'I'm Feeling Lucky' button is that it doesn't do anything useful. (ie it doesn't provide any information that you can't get by pressing 'Return' - which is always easier than having to pick the mouse up and press on a button) If Google were to remove it one day, I'd be surprised if anyone noticed.


5

Not really. Frequency is one issue - but eye tracking is all about eye saccades. This is a mild oversimplification - hopefully folk won't mind. Hold your arm out and stick your thumb up. The size of top half of your thumb is roughly the size of the bit of your visual field that sees in 'high res' - the fovea. It takes up less than 1% of the retina area, ...


5

Is the reality that most UX designers/researchers start in visual/graphic/web design and move into UX? This varies a lot from market to market. In Minneapolis, where I currently work, the vast majority of "UX designers" have backgrounds in visual design. But: As much as anything, this is because there are very few people in this market with a ...


4

Design a dashboard of data. Allow users to drill down and edit the content. That sounds like a very specific task, but it's actually one that would expose students to many facets of UX: The visual display of quantitative information Discoverability of content and information scenting Relationships between views and drilldowns; when to use modal windows ...


4

I think you should look into Cognitive Task Load. Which is a model of the strain on the users cognition. The idea is that you don't want the strain to be too low so that your users become bored. Neither too high so they give up. I've studied under Mark Neerincx and he has a couple of good papers in this area. Another good resource in my opinion is ...


4

I think you're confusing Deep Processing, more accurately referred to as "Levels of Processing" with "lots of stuff going on at once". That's not quite it; the generally accepted reason people remember "deep" things is because they process them at multiple levels. So to remember a word instead of just seeing it on a screen you could hear the word aloud, ...


4

Badges are one of the best methods of building up users' engagement. They are rewards at no cost for the system issuer, like a perpetuum mobile. The best thing is that this model is universal - it works both in systems like Q&A, forums and games - and most probably in almost any multi-user environment. This is also very similar to real life (e.g. army, ...


4

Have you considered already indicating the availability during typing? Then the dismissal of the name would not come as a surprise to the user and they wouldn't be trapped in edit mode.


4

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


3

Design an android/iphone/windows class schedule phone app for a specific user group as students . The user research part would involve studying about the best design practices for such an app and interviewing students to find out how they would want such an app to be. Other research aspects could be an contextual enquiry into situations where users might ...


3

This is a very interesting question. I think that usability requirements like "instantaneous" by itself is pretty much worthless. You should have verifiable criteria for responsiveness. However you should also beforehand make sure that whatever verifiable criteria you set should be possible to measure and achieve. I'd imagine that a lot of response time ...


3

Well, Feng-GUI.com tries to create a heatmap based on AI. The reliability has been discussed in other questions: Has anyone got experience of Feng GUI and been able to test it against real users?



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