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0

The Unavailable mouse pointer is always an option that's understood my millions of Windows users:


2

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


2

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has created and maintains a wonderful website: http://www.usability.gov. It contains a wealth of UX resources of various types, including the ones from a government organization perspective (see section "Guidance and Government-specific Resources" at http://www.usability.gov/how-to-and-tools/index.html). Hope it ...


13

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


2

how about a border around the box with diagonal stripes. diagonal stripes, similar to construction tape will suggest to the user that this area is not usable at the moment.


2

For me it depends on the needs. There are generally two scenarios.. I want user to continue on another article. I want user to take reference from another article. If its 1st then he is done with current page and so the link should be opening in same tab. If its 2nd then he should be coming back to the current article after taking reference so, the link ...


2

I would refer to this article on CSS Tricks. It list both good and bad instances to open links in a new window (i.e. use target="_blank") Bad reasons Because you like it that way Because you don't want users to ever leave your page To differentiate between "internal" and "external" links Because it links to a PDF Because a client wants it that way Because ...


0

It is really difficult to do a comparison study between different websites because there are so many variables that affect the end result. However, if you are looking for general areas to work with, I would suggest the high level metrics like task completion rate, SUS scores and NPS scores to compare, and then use it to highlight areas of similarity or ...


1

I tried to find the source of who proposed the idea of using Space to Pause and Resume a video. Unfortunately, I could not find an exact source. That being said, it has a reason to be there. When watching a video the focus of attention of the user is entirely on the video itself. It makes sense to place the largest key in the keyboard to perform the ...


1

If you only show a summary of each post on the first page: if they bookmark a post, then it must have been 'opened' with a unique url if they want the latest posts, then they can bookmark the summary page it's much easier for someone to scan through posts


1

Quoting Jakob Nielsen here: " If possible, use radio buttons rather than drop-down menus. Radio buttons have lower cognitive load because they make all options permanently visible so that users can easily compare them. Radio buttons are also easier to operate for users who have difficulty making precise mouse movements. (Limited space might sometimes force ...


2

There are no hard and fast rules for this. It entirely depends on how "disabled" the control looks to the user. In the link you provided to the bootstrap forms, it doesn't strike me as very obvious that some types of controls are disabled. The text entry and select menus are fine, but for the radio buttons and check boxes I can only be sure they are ...


2

A common practice it's to disable only the field and not the label. Even if a field is disabled the user must be able to read its label. This is an example of Bootstrap UI Bootstrap Forms In this example, there is also a mouse indicator, when the user hovers a disabled field



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