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Make these fields part of a one form with a single submit button. This reduces the number of interactions for the user and cognitive load. I would also consider top alining the labels and adding padding between questions for clarity. In addition you could consider adding a title for each field-set.


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For example, one can use a bold tag, strong tag, inline CSS style, a syntax like Markdown, or even JavaScript to boldface text on a website and any of those solutions may result in an equivalent UX. This isn't true at all. It may result in an equivalent visual, but they certainly aren't the same thing. And this can cause plenty of problems...be it with ...


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"Material Design" leans heavily on visual design elements from the print world From Material Design principles website: Bold, graphic, intentional. The foundational elements of print-based design—typography, grids, space, scale, color, and use of imagery—guide visual treatments. Material is the metaphor... The material is grounded in tactile ...


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With the currently widespread use of touchscreen devices like smartphones or tablets, a hover element is not really user-friendly, since touchscreens cannot really show hover elements. In this case, there is a good alternative: energy labels in Europe have a letter(+(+(+))) indication that is easy to display in a small box and is clear to the average user ...


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When a user select a seat, she is having a device in front of her imagining the ride she is about to take. For the user the forward direction is in the line of sight and away in the distance. Thinking of going forward makes a vertical seat map more natural. The front of the vehicle need to point upward to make this analogy work. The horizontal ...


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When I think of sitting "next to" someone, I think of horizontal rows. Having my seat mate either "under me" or "over me" doesn't mesh as well with my visualization of the real world. But that's just an opinion, not a measured observation. To be practical, execute a usability study.


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I think either way is suitable as long as its clear which is the front and which is the rear. You started to allude to a good point though when you said "For me, vertical seatmaps are easier to read and easier to manipulate on smaller screens." Considering the context of where it is placed and who the audience is may reveal what is the best option.


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Try both and see which one users respond to better. A/B testing is a good way to do that. As for my personal thought, I'd think vertical is better. Much like maps have North at the top, I would think of the vehicle front as the top. This is the way I've seen airlines do it, so perhaps it's just my past experience has trained me that way.


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I cannot give a comprehensive answer, but there is one very important case where the table is superior. Sometimes we have lots of equally structured items (that's an important precondition!) and need to display lots of information about an item in an UI which supports multiple tasks (or multiple scenarios of the same task), but only one piece is relevant ...


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1) One important aspect is that a tile layout makes it easier to analyse the items one by one (a) while a table makes it easier to compare the items (b): a) The power of getting all the data around one content item in one separated layout item is not to be underestimated. The analogy between the two entities makes it a lot easier to focus on in and make a ...



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