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17

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


10

There is some interesting academic work surrounding ethics and user experience, even though I have not come across a formal/industry "code of ethics" for UX practitioners specifically. There are books that touch on the "dark patterns" of experience design, and you will see some related questions here on UX.SE to that effect. One of the more recent academic ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


5

My approach to this is completely style-guide oriented. The online Oxford Guide Style states: The general rule is not to use a capital letter unless it is absolutely required. The book itself states: Capitalize the first letter of headings and captions. So it appears Sentence Case is the way to go, event for captions.


5

You are absolutely right, that current label is very poor. I would recommend Edit Element Although edit by its self would be better, but it does depend on the context. You will find this list of guidelines set out by Microsoft helpful to get your terminology correct. Also see this question as it is related to this but on the subject of Exit. ...


5

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


4

If it’s a permanent setting, so it’s unlikely that users would change it regularly, add it to the settings menu. A user that opens the settings menu and only finds a single setting would hardly be confused (let alone bothered *). Less time configuring, more fun. There is also some value in definitely knowing that there is only one setting. No need to look ...


4

From the article: How to Use Arrow and Ellipsis Affordances Sometimes a button or menu option will open a modal window instead of completing an action. An ellipsis affordance tells users this is what happens. In the english language, writers use ellipses for unfinished thoughts. On a user interface, designers use ellipsis on buttons and menus for ...


4

As everyone suggested, please do look at the existing research in the area. That said, here are some suggestions I found on what would be the expected best practices in defining dashboard specific content for automobiles. Ensure content is visible from a distance : Do note that while you would be hoping that your drivers have good eyesight they will have ...


4

The User Experience Professionals Association (UXPA) has a Code of Professional Conduct for UX practitioners, with oversight provided by an Ethics Advisory Committee. The code is designed to "guide members in the performance of their professional responsibilities" and requires members to "evaluate the risks and benefits of their actions on all stakeholders ...


4

When a user select a seat, she is having a device in front of her imagining the ride she is about to take. For the user the forward direction is in the line of sight and away in the distance. Thinking of going forward makes a vertical seat map more natural. The front of the vehicle need to point upward to make this analogy work. The horizontal ...


3

I've actually just dealt with this subject in a mobile-optimized web-app where the designers were too used to iOS and aligned the title in the center without considering alternatives. One of the advantages of aligning the activity title on the left is mainly that it saves space. It creates a logical cut-off point if the title gets too long or if the screen ...


3

From my experience as an Android user and developer, I've found that there is a big number of apps that don't follow these navigation patterns and the use up as it was back. They don't distinguish between up and back. Up, as the name suggests, should take user one level higher in activities hierarchy. Whereas back should show the screen that was previously ...


3

I am a human factors and systems engineer and anthropologist who focuses on human computer interaction (HCI). I teach UX, contract with large companies as a UX specialist, and will be beginning my PhD in HCI within the next 6 months. Ethics in UX / HCI is a problem. Why? Because there are no ethical standards. Our discipline is still new, but it is time we ...


2

Aside from the case that has been made for improved readability, I also argue for sentence case it on the grounds that it's an easier rule to remember for people actually implementing (graphic designers, engineering, writers, etc.). Title case lends itself to all kinds of arbitrary decisions when implementers don't want to be bothered to look up whether ...


2

Title Case for Headings and Buttons It's easier and faster for users if they can to identify the shapes of words. "We recognize words from their word shape." also called the Bouma Shape. Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition Bouma Shape: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition#Bouma_shape A Few Examples ...


2

Android is not as hard to work with as people think, it just requires a little more effort! The best place to start looking is the actual Android design guidelines which can be found on the Android developers site but it's designed purely for Android designers. The basics are: Android is broken down into different "versions" which are exactly the same ...


2

Colors can evoke emotion. For example red symbolises passion, blue trustworthiness and green innovation. Just googling 'color emotion' or 'color meaning' and maybe even in combination with the term 'website' can give you lots of reading material. Choosing colors is also about what looks good, but that's aesthetic and has little to do with UX for it is more ...


2

Your colors should tie into your brand, should never overwhelm your users, and should be used consistently in your design. While there is deep psychology behind colors, different products treat them in very different ways. For example, red is very often used for warnings or errors. But currently Google products are using red for user inputs like composing ...


2

I interpret your question as: given the best and worst monitors, what can I do to convey my visual cues effectively on all of them? For visual cues, color is not the only distinction: shape, outline, position and context are all important to identify the semantics of an element or cue. When coloring is important, it is in most cases the contrast that's ...


2

I think Manage Element is suitable, because this word mean contain all operation which performed like add, update and delete. Because In many software they use word like "Manage your application" and what we do in it ? Ans is simple. Add, update and delete. So "Manage Element" is Good from my point of view. "Edit", "Update" and "Modify" are with same ...


2

Instead of words, I think icons are probably a better way to go. You can make them however big or small you want to fit whatever space requirements you have. And they just look cleaner than words that are repeated for every element. For add, delete, and modify you can use plus, minus, and pencil icons: If you are going to be opening modals for each ...


2

I don't know that it's rare you don't see a date, but yes, the rule of thumb for publishing most any content is to provide date information along with it. This is how most publishing has always been (books, papers, magazines, etc.) and that isn't really any different on the web. It obviously matters more for certain content than other. I wouldn't say the ...


2

Unfortunately, there is no standard code in the industry, and anyone can do as they please. Not only there is no code, Interface Design is often used against the interest of users. In recent years, the shadowy work done by those less moralistic is exposed under the topic nicknamed "Dark Patterns". The main website dedicated to it (http://darkpatterns.org/) ...


2

As already mentioned by Matt Obee the UXPA provide a comprehensive code of conduct. Not directly related to UX - but I find parts of the BPS (British Psychological Society) ethical guidelines can be adapted to User Experience. They are built on the principles of: Respect Competence Responsibility Integrity Each of these principles is broken down ...


2

To my opinion animations should add context and shouldn't be superfluous. Animating an off-canvas menu while it moves on screen adds context. It tells the user where it comes from. This article gives you a lot more examples than I can give you. It's worth a read. In the example template I mostly see superfluous animations.


2

I'd say it depends on how much space you have. If you have the space, and opening/appending is an essential part of the functionality of the app, what is the problem with showing two buttons? Buttons don't change a lot in my experience. I see much more disabling of buttons that aren't applicable in a certain context. For instance, the append button should be ...


2

The closest thing I can think of to what you're looking for are Interface Guidelines. A good example of this is Apple's iOS 7 Human Interface Guidelines, specifically the controls section. They have lots of pictures of UI elements with call outs, descriptions of how they are meant to be used, and defining characteristics. Other sources: iOS 7 Human ...



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