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40

Arrows have been an indicator of direction for so long that it's hard to say for sure, but my guess would be that an arrow fired from a bow only has one direction it can go, lending ease of communication when direction is needed. And since bow & arrows have been around long enough, and in practically every culture it has basically become universal. ...


37

Is the arrow symbol truly universal? The United States launched two spacecraft in 1972 and 1973 with a message for any alien species that might encounter them. The message was specifically designed to be universally interpretable. It built up it's own number system from scratch using the fundamental properties of the Hydrogen atom. The goal was to ...


29

Just to offer an alternative hypothesis, the fact that the basic shape is two lines converging on a single point, might have something to do with perspective: In this case the sense of direction is created by our very own direction. There may not have been very many highways in paleolithic Africa, but the plains may well have had some similar features. At ...


18

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


8

In English it is standard practice to capitalize each word in a heading. It looks "wrong" to native English readers. However this is not necessarily the case in other languages. If your target audience are English speakers then the answer is a clear-cut yes. Capitalize Each Word. (There are exceptions but this works as a general rule.) Here is what to ...


7

Frankly, this is contextual. For a single word, generally 2-4 letters are kept as minimum to initiate the auto complete feature. There are at least two reasons for this. One being the performance as you pointed out. There is no need to fire up a filtering call when you know that the resultant dataset will be huge. Second being, the number of results you ...


6

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


6

I think the Arrow symbol is pretty universal, even without spears or perspective. Easy task: Specify a certain point / direction with colour on a wall. If you just paint a Dot it is hardly visible. A line may provide direction, but is ambiguous as it points in two directions. The best way to explicitly point to one direction/think is having multiple lines, ...


6

Ethics and UX are on the same side. It's kind of a non-issue. Because the objective of UX, always serves the interests of the users. The point where UI starts to confuse users and tricks them into pressing something they wouldn't have pressed otherwise, then the UX has failed on that application. And yes, you should step in. As a UX practitioner you might ...


5

From the article: How to Use Arrow and Ellipsis Affordances Sometimes a button or menu option will open a modal window instead of completing an action. An ellipsis affordance tells users this is what happens. In the english language, writers use ellipses for unfinished thoughts. On a user interface, designers use ellipsis on buttons and menus for ...


4

When a user select a seat, she is having a device in front of her imagining the ride she is about to take. For the user the forward direction is in the line of sight and away in the distance. Thinking of going forward makes a vertical seat map more natural. The front of the vehicle need to point upward to make this analogy work. The horizontal ...


4

I guess there is no clear answer if there are standardised easings. The type of easing is depending on what additional information you want to provide on current interaction in the current context. So for example: Interaction is removing an item off screen. When the item is of high importance, it has more "weight" and is "more sticky" to remove. When ...


3

The closest thing I can think of to what you're looking for are Interface Guidelines. A good example of this is Apple's iOS 7 Human Interface Guidelines, specifically the controls section. They have lots of pictures of UI elements with call outs, descriptions of how they are meant to be used, and defining characteristics. Other sources: iOS 7 Human ...


3

There are no hard and fast rules for this. It entirely depends on how "disabled" the control looks to the user. In the link you provided to the bootstrap forms, it doesn't strike me as very obvious that some types of controls are disabled. The text entry and select menus are fine, but for the radio buttons and check boxes I can only be sure they are ...


3

This page on the developer.android.com website shows that Lollipop now has a marketshare of 5.4% over all Android versions. According to this page, material design will work on Android 5.0 (API 21) or higher only. That said, it would not be smart to focus on such a small group only. What you can do is check the current API level of the user's phone, and ...


3

The Design Apps for the Windows Desktop page has all the information for Windows 8 desktop applications. For example - in the Controls section under the Text Boxes subsection you will find the "Recommended sizing and spacing" section, which has the following picture: Other sections have similar treatment. The Interactions and usability with Windows ...


2

how about a border around the box with diagonal stripes. diagonal stripes, similar to construction tape will suggest to the user that this area is not usable at the moment.


2

For me it depends on the needs. There are generally two scenarios.. I want user to continue on another article. I want user to take reference from another article. If its 1st then he is done with current page and so the link should be opening in same tab. If its 2nd then he should be coming back to the current article after taking reference so, the link ...


2

I would refer to this article on CSS Tricks. It list both good and bad instances to open links in a new window (i.e. use target="_blank") Bad reasons Because you like it that way Because you don't want users to ever leave your page To differentiate between "internal" and "external" links Because it links to a PDF Because a client wants it that way Because ...


2

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has created and maintains a wonderful website: http://www.usability.gov. It contains a wealth of UX resources of various types, including the ones from a government organization perspective (see section "Guidance and Government-specific Resources" at http://www.usability.gov/how-to-and-tools/index.html). Hope it ...


2

A common practice it's to disable only the field and not the label. Even if a field is disabled the user must be able to read its label. This is an example of Bootstrap UI Bootstrap Forms In this example, there is also a mouse indicator, when the user hovers a disabled field


2

If it's a website that has a lot of products in many categories, showing the category is a good way to help the user find what they are looking for. Example: when a user is searching for: game of thr Game of thrones in books Game of thrones in DVDs Game of thrones in eBooks Game of thrones Game of throubles Game of three and so on..


2

"Material Design" leans heavily on visual design elements from the print world From Material Design principles website: Bold, graphic, intentional. The foundational elements of print-based design—typography, grids, space, scale, color, and use of imagery—guide visual treatments. Material is the metaphor... The material is grounded in tactile ...


2

Use sub menus with edit and delete options. It may not provide such immediate access to the options, but it would definitely fit the 'familiarity' aspect of how users expect to interact with menus. Sub-menus mean the options have more room to breath and are easier to click on rather than tiny areas squeezed on to the end of the menu items. It also allows ...


2

The arrow predates recorded history. Physically, arrows go in one direction--the direction of the point at the end. A drawn arrow is a representation of a physical arrow. It's an object that has been known to mankind for most all of human history. Most people would intuit the direction from the pictogram.


2

What are the reason arrows are interpreted as direction? Is this a cultural thing or is there something profoundly intuitive to it? I think it’s actually both so the answer is two fold: Arrow - Intuitiveness Intuitiveness is directly linked to affordance or rather perceived affordance. Norman thus defines an affordance as something of both ...


2

When designing for mobile first, this approach is very ideal. It will likely lead to more action for the user, but when moving this back to desktop the experience can be cloned. It is assumed that mobile users might be using this phone while on the go and not on a desk thus 'lengthy' content per page is not very ideal as the user might not be looking at the ...



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