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21

In this situation, I would not use a drop down until you need to. Using a drop down with one option will be annoying to some degree because people will click on it and expect more choices but not find any. Also, people will be trained to not click on that drop down because its 'useless'. You'll have to somehow retrain them to look for the new options ...


13

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


12

The only time you should use a dropdown where there is only one available option is: to stay consistent with pages that have many options for the same selection. For example: You are shopping for a new pair of shoes and are currently looking at a style that has sizes 5-14 available. These sizes are displayed in a dropdown. You click on a different style ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


10

There is some interesting academic work surrounding ethics and user experience, even though I have not come across a formal/industry "code of ethics" for UX practitioners specifically. There are books that touch on the "dark patterns" of experience design, and you will see some related questions here on UX.SE to that effect. One of the more recent academic ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


6

Can you explain the reasoning behind this? I think you'll catch the idea from the image. So, there should be clear indicator of non-completed number.


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


5

Regardless of the mix of types of data in one table, the data type in the individual column should drive the alignment. Typical alignments (and of course, there are always reasons and ways to do differently) Text and items treated like text: Left Align (caveat: I find numbers always easiest to read rt aligned) Numbers and items treated like numbers: Right ...


5

Here are some that came across my mind: The best practice ever is not letting your system freeze at all. Consider better, more efficient serverside. Of course this cannot be done in some situations, but is a good thing to check at the beginning, because no matter how you tell the user the system is busy, it's always better to show that it just works. If ...


5

My approach to this is completely style-guide oriented. The online Oxford Guide Style states: The general rule is not to use a capital letter unless it is absolutely required. The book itself states: Capitalize the first letter of headings and captions. So it appears Sentence Case is the way to go, event for captions.


5

You are absolutely right, that current label is very poor. I would recommend Edit Element Although edit by its self would be better, but it does depend on the context. You will find this list of guidelines set out by Microsoft helpful to get your terminology correct. Also see this question as it is related to this but on the subject of Exit. ...


4

From the article: How to Use Arrow and Ellipsis Affordances Sometimes a button or menu option will open a modal window instead of completing an action. An ellipsis affordance tells users this is what happens. In the english language, writers use ellipses for unfinished thoughts. On a user interface, designers use ellipsis on buttons and menus for ...


4

I propose some improvements, based on the usability heuristics. The main issue here is the absence of clear focal point which leads to the convertion task execution. Also the task itself could be fully automated, there no man needed. Just provide FTP address and access parameters to a database. And let it run as batch process.


4

If it’s a permanent setting, so it’s unlikely that users would change it regularly, add it to the settings menu. A user that opens the settings menu and only finds a single setting would hardly be confused (let alone bothered *). Less time configuring, more fun. There is also some value in definitely knowing that there is only one setting. No need to look ...


4

As everyone suggested, please do look at the existing research in the area. That said, here are some suggestions I found on what would be the expected best practices in defining dashboard specific content for automobiles. Ensure content is visible from a distance : Do note that while you would be hoping that your drivers have good eyesight they will have ...


4

The User Experience Professionals Association (UXPA) has a Code of Professional Conduct for UX practitioners, with oversight provided by an Ethics Advisory Committee. The code is designed to "guide members in the performance of their professional responsibilities" and requires members to "evaluate the risks and benefits of their actions on all stakeholders ...


3

If you've re-designed UIs for web or other mobile platforms before then you really needn't change your process for Android tablet app design, the same steps apply. You need to identify problem areas then come up with creative solutions that are (preferably) within the Android guidelines using all the usual methods (user journeys, wireframes, personas etc). ...


3

Honestly it depends on the context. Sometimes it makes sense to disable specific UI. This happens regularly with ecommerce websites. Once you submit an order, most ecommerce websites worth their salt disable the "Order Now" button (visually still there, but grayed out, user's cursor changes, loading animation appears in the button, etc) to help prevent ...


3

From my experience as an Android user and developer, I've found that there is a big number of apps that don't follow these navigation patterns and the use up as it was back. They don't distinguish between up and back. Up, as the name suggests, should take user one level higher in activities hierarchy. Whereas back should show the screen that was previously ...


3

I've actually just dealt with this subject in a mobile-optimized web-app where the designers were too used to iOS and aligned the title in the center without considering alternatives. One of the advantages of aligning the activity title on the left is mainly that it saves space. It creates a logical cut-off point if the title gets too long or if the screen ...


3

I am a human factors and systems engineer and anthropologist who focuses on human computer interaction (HCI). I teach UX, contract with large companies as a UX specialist, and will be beginning my PhD in HCI within the next 6 months. Ethics in UX / HCI is a problem. Why? Because there are no ethical standards. Our discipline is still new, but it is time we ...


3

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


2

Aside from the case that has been made for improved readability, I also argue for sentence case it on the grounds that it's an easier rule to remember for people actually implementing (graphic designers, engineering, writers, etc.). Title case lends itself to all kinds of arbitrary decisions when implementers don't want to be bothered to look up whether ...


2

Title Case for Headings and Buttons It's easier and faster for users if they can to identify the shapes of words. "We recognize words from their word shape." also called the Bouma Shape. Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition Bouma Shape: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition#Bouma_shape A Few Examples ...


2

I have experience of three different tools for creating style guides: Confluence The first style guide I implemented was built using Confluence. It was more a design pattern library, containing patterns and best practices for the most common UI design problems. Each pattern contained an example image, description how it works and why it should be used, and ...


2

The main problem with a ribbon on a website is the wide range of devices you (might) need to account for. The obvious problem is it won't work well on a phone size device, the the other problem is the size of a pixel unit (css px, or device pixel) varies greatly depending on the device. I've seen apps that work fine on an iPad but on an iPad mini become ...


2

I don't think that there are any web-specific considerations regarding the use of the ribbon. One somewhat relevant factor is that the ribbon is well-designed for the use of keyboard shortcuts which isn't as common on the web as on the desktop, but otherwise I think that all the usual considerations apply. Actually Balsamiq uses a ribbon-like interface with ...


2

In my opinion I think the best way would be to 'CODE' up the design guide into real examples of the style. Essentially, code up the html, css, and related javascript and display example forms, buttons, paragraphs, sections, comments etc. This has the benefit of being a live example of how it is done, for developers, and gives you the designer a sense of ...


2

Android is not as hard to work with as people think, it just requires a little more effort! The best place to start looking is the actual Android design guidelines which can be found on the Android developers site but it's designed purely for Android designers. The basics are: Android is broken down into different "versions" which are exactly the same ...



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