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40

Arrows have been an indicator of direction for so long that it's hard to say for sure, but my guess would be that an arrow fired from a bow only has one direction it can go, lending ease of communication when direction is needed. And since bow & arrows have been around long enough, and in practically every culture it has basically become universal. ...


37

Is the arrow symbol truly universal? The United States launched two spacecraft in 1972 and 1973 with a message for any alien species that might encounter them. The message was specifically designed to be universally interpretable. It built up it's own number system from scratch using the fundamental properties of the Hydrogen atom. The goal was to ...


29

Just to offer an alternative hypothesis, the fact that the basic shape is two lines converging on a single point, might have something to do with perspective: In this case the sense of direction is created by our very own direction. There may not have been very many highways in paleolithic Africa, but the plains may well have had some similar features. At ...


9

In English it is standard practice to capitalize each word in a heading. It looks "wrong" to native English readers. However this is not necessarily the case in other languages. If your target audience are English speakers then the answer is a clear-cut yes. Capitalize Each Word. (There are exceptions but this works as a general rule.) Here is what to ...


7

Frankly, this is contextual. For a single word, generally 2-4 letters are kept as minimum to initiate the auto complete feature. There are at least two reasons for this. One being the performance as you pointed out. There is no need to fire up a filtering call when you know that the resultant dataset will be huge. Second being, the number of results you ...


6

Ethics and UX are on the same side. It's kind of a non-issue. Because the objective of UX, always serves the interests of the users. The point where UI starts to confuse users and tricks them into pressing something they wouldn't have pressed otherwise, then the UX has failed on that application. And yes, you should step in. As a UX practitioner you might ...


6

I think the Arrow symbol is pretty universal, even without spears or perspective. Easy task: Specify a certain point / direction with colour on a wall. If you just paint a Dot it is hardly visible. A line may provide direction, but is ambiguous as it points in two directions. The best way to explicitly point to one direction/think is having multiple lines, ...


4

I guess there is no clear answer if there are standardised easings. The type of easing is depending on what additional information you want to provide on current interaction in the current context. So for example: Interaction is removing an item off screen. When the item is of high importance, it has more "weight" and is "more sticky" to remove. When ...


3

This page on the developer.android.com website shows that Lollipop now has a marketshare of 5.4% over all Android versions. According to this page, material design will work on Android 5.0 (API 21) or higher only. That said, it would not be smart to focus on such a small group only. What you can do is check the current API level of the user's phone, and ...


3

The Design Apps for the Windows Desktop page has all the information for Windows 8 desktop applications. For example - in the Controls section under the Text Boxes subsection you will find the "Recommended sizing and spacing" section, which has the following picture: Other sections have similar treatment. The Interactions and usability with Windows ...


2

If it's a website that has a lot of products in many categories, showing the category is a good way to help the user find what they are looking for. Example: when a user is searching for: game of thr Game of thrones in books Game of thrones in DVDs Game of thrones in eBooks Game of thrones Game of throubles Game of three and so on..


2

Use sub menus with edit and delete options. It may not provide such immediate access to the options, but it would definitely fit the 'familiarity' aspect of how users expect to interact with menus. Sub-menus mean the options have more room to breath and are easier to click on rather than tiny areas squeezed on to the end of the menu items. It also allows ...


2

What are the reason arrows are interpreted as direction? Is this a cultural thing or is there something profoundly intuitive to it? I think it’s actually both so the answer is two fold: Arrow - Intuitiveness Intuitiveness is directly linked to affordance or rather perceived affordance. Norman thus defines an affordance as something of both ...


2

The arrow predates recorded history. Physically, arrows go in one direction--the direction of the point at the end. A drawn arrow is a representation of a physical arrow. It's an object that has been known to mankind for most all of human history. Most people would intuit the direction from the pictogram.


2

When designing for mobile first, this approach is very ideal. It will likely lead to more action for the user, but when moving this back to desktop the experience can be cloned. It is assumed that mobile users might be using this phone while on the go and not on a desk thus 'lengthy' content per page is not very ideal as the user might not be looking at the ...


2

Not always In the early days of waterfall-driven, formal development the answer would have been yes, because slow, formal development cycles and "open-loop", shipped installed-software products meant the cost of reworking UX was very high. These days, development cycles tend to be iterative and can range from very slow to very fast. Some examples: For ...


2

Yes, for one very simple reason. It helps your team formalise a point of view. Even if the documentation isn't used by everyone, the process of creating it makes you and your team build an opinion and point of view which helps you in anything longer than a few months ahead. Remember that the frameworks you use to execute design like bootstrap were not your ...


2

A key strength of Material design is that it is defined from abstract principles downwards. While specification does include definition of components, it is (a) not prescriptive, and most importantly (b) there is enough mid-level and high-level guidance that a designer can create a new component that fits in with the other Material design components. ...


2

Just a note to add to @merqri answer: you may consider a feature, in which user typing a filter string gets information (it can be an approximation), how many results there are. If the number of results is narrowed down to eg. five, you may show them even after two characters. Take a look at MS Excel autocomplete feature: you have some texts (strings) in ...


2

It depends on the specific use case, but there is no agreed-upon minimum number of characters that is required before doing filtering. If too many results can get returned, limit the initial set, preferably to the most likely (if that can be determined), or some other metric like most recent. If you use Chrome, go ahead and try it. Enter a single character ...


2

A difference should be made between exact results for auto-completion/filter and inexact. A colleague complained to me that in most cases it is very dificult for him to look for or use/mention his own profile on many sites, because when he has completely typed his name, auto-complete doesn't kick in. His name is Li. One of the most used names around the ...


2

Just as in all navigation, the key isn't really the amount of options/actions but how understandable they are and how they fit to user's mental model of the application in use and its purpose. As a rule, you need enough categories to adequately represent the scope of information offered on your site or application. Top 3 IA Questions about Navigation ...


2

Here is a link to a simple demo It sounds like you have the right idea and here are a couple things to keep in mind. Context is important Place your action buttons in line with the images that will receive them. It is easier to scan and delete an image when the button is close by. Tell the user why an action isn't available Let the user know why ...


1

Provided the control can be styled and made to behave within the guidelines of material style and consistent behaviour, I'd say use it. I get the impression that the Material Design guidelines are largely concerned with how an app appears and behaves, and doesn't necessarily prescribe a narrow list of controls you can choose from. In cases where you want ...


1

This guide may be what you are looking for although it isn't specifically to JavaFX it does try and explain Java user interface components across a broad spectrum of Java based frameworks. Java Look and Feel Design Guidelines There is also a nice list of Human Interface Guidelines kept up to date on wikipedia. Human interface guidelines - Wikipedia Hope ...


1

I guess as per the new material design guidelines, they even some dimensions about the same. I hope you were looking for the same.


1

The guide below lists consistent terms for various actions and even shows how to spell things in American English as they value consistent spelling and capitalization across action buttons. http://www.uxmatters.com/aboutus/uxmatters-style-guide.php The verbs you use will vary greatly depending on your target audience (old, young, technical, ...


1

Normally the folder navigation / selection and naming of a document are presented on the same screen. Something like this layout: The default file name is pre-populated in an editable text field that the user can edit if they wish, or leave as is.


1

I am sure a lot of people around here have read most of the Dark Patterns all around the web. It is hard to say where to draw the line especially when the UX designers have to deal with product managers and sales/marketing people. It is hard because each of position within a product team will have 'equal' weight. So yes, some dark patters will make more ...


1

I guess it's for having all the focus from the user. Having too much information on the same screen can have a negative effect, give the impression that there is too much to do.



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