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40

Arrows have been an indicator of direction for so long that it's hard to say for sure, but my guess would be that an arrow fired from a bow only has one direction it can go, lending ease of communication when direction is needed. And since bow & arrows have been around long enough, and in practically every culture it has basically become universal. ...


35

Is the arrow symbol truly universal? The United States launched two spacecraft in 1972 and 1973 with a message for any alien species that might encounter them. The message was specifically designed to be universally interpretable. It built up it's own number system from scratch using the fundamental properties of the Hydrogen atom. The goal was to ...


29

Just to offer an alternative hypothesis, the fact that the basic shape is two lines converging on a single point, might have something to do with perspective: In this case the sense of direction is created by our very own direction. There may not have been very many highways in paleolithic Africa, but the plains may well have had some similar features. At ...


18

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


10

There is some interesting academic work surrounding ethics and user experience, even though I have not come across a formal/industry "code of ethics" for UX practitioners specifically. There are books that touch on the "dark patterns" of experience design, and you will see some related questions here on UX.SE to that effect. One of the more recent academic ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


6

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


6

I think the Arrow symbol is pretty universal, even without spears or perspective. Easy task: Specify a certain point / direction with colour on a wall. If you just paint a Dot it is hardly visible. A line may provide direction, but is ambiguous as it points in two directions. The best way to explicitly point to one direction/think is having multiple lines, ...


6

Ethics and UX are on the same side. It's kind of a non-issue. Because the objective of UX, always serves the interests of the users. The point where UI starts to confuse users and tricks them into pressing something they wouldn't have pressed otherwise, then the UX has failed on that application. And yes, you should step in. As a UX practitioner you might ...


5

From the article: How to Use Arrow and Ellipsis Affordances Sometimes a button or menu option will open a modal window instead of completing an action. An ellipsis affordance tells users this is what happens. In the english language, writers use ellipses for unfinished thoughts. On a user interface, designers use ellipsis on buttons and menus for ...


4

The User Experience Professionals Association (UXPA) has a Code of Professional Conduct for UX practitioners, with oversight provided by an Ethics Advisory Committee. The code is designed to "guide members in the performance of their professional responsibilities" and requires members to "evaluate the risks and benefits of their actions on all stakeholders ...


4

When a user select a seat, she is having a device in front of her imagining the ride she is about to take. For the user the forward direction is in the line of sight and away in the distance. Thinking of going forward makes a vertical seat map more natural. The front of the vehicle need to point upward to make this analogy work. The horizontal ...


4

I guess there is no clear answer if there are standardised easings. The type of easing is depending on what additional information you want to provide on current interaction in the current context. So for example: Interaction is removing an item off screen. When the item is of high importance, it has more "weight" and is "more sticky" to remove. When ...


3

The closest thing I can think of to what you're looking for are Interface Guidelines. A good example of this is Apple's iOS 7 Human Interface Guidelines, specifically the controls section. They have lots of pictures of UI elements with call outs, descriptions of how they are meant to be used, and defining characteristics. Other sources: iOS 7 Human ...


3

I am a human factors and systems engineer and anthropologist who focuses on human computer interaction (HCI). I teach UX, contract with large companies as a UX specialist, and will be beginning my PhD in HCI within the next 6 months. Ethics in UX / HCI is a problem. Why? Because there are no ethical standards. Our discipline is still new, but it is time we ...


3

It's a heated topic to be sure, but the best insight comes from understanding the usage and intent of a user clicking a link and specifically how this relates to the work at hand and what is going on in the user's mind (i.e. what they are trying to achieve by clicking the link and how that relates to their workflow). In general, if a link results in leaving ...


3

Aside from the case that has been made for improved readability, I also argue for sentence case it on the grounds that it's an easier rule to remember for people actually implementing (graphic designers, engineering, writers, etc.). Title case lends itself to all kinds of arbitrary decisions when implementers don't want to be bothered to look up whether ...


2

Title Case for Headings and Buttons It's easier and faster for users if they can to identify the shapes of words. "We recognize words from their word shape." also called the Bouma Shape. Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition Bouma Shape: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition#Bouma_shape A Few Examples ...


2

I don't know that it's rare you don't see a date, but yes, the rule of thumb for publishing most any content is to provide date information along with it. This is how most publishing has always been (books, papers, magazines, etc.) and that isn't really any different on the web. It obviously matters more for certain content than other. I wouldn't say the ...


2

Unfortunately, there is no standard code in the industry, and anyone can do as they please. Not only there is no code, Interface Design is often used against the interest of users. In recent years, the shadowy work done by those less moralistic is exposed under the topic nicknamed "Dark Patterns". The main website dedicated to it (http://darkpatterns.org/) ...


2

As already mentioned by Matt Obee the UXPA provide a comprehensive code of conduct. Not directly related to UX - but I find parts of the BPS (British Psychological Society) ethical guidelines can be adapted to User Experience. They are built on the principles of: Respect Competence Responsibility Integrity Each of these principles is broken down ...


2

To my opinion animations should add context and shouldn't be superfluous. Animating an off-canvas menu while it moves on screen adds context. It tells the user where it comes from. This article gives you a lot more examples than I can give you. It's worth a read. In the example template I mostly see superfluous animations.


2

I'd say it depends on how much space you have. If you have the space, and opening/appending is an essential part of the functionality of the app, what is the problem with showing two buttons? Buttons don't change a lot in my experience. I see much more disabling of buttons that aren't applicable in a certain context. For instance, the append button should be ...


2

There are no hard and fast rules for this. It entirely depends on how "disabled" the control looks to the user. In the link you provided to the bootstrap forms, it doesn't strike me as very obvious that some types of controls are disabled. The text entry and select menus are fine, but for the radio buttons and check boxes I can only be sure they are ...


2

A common practice it's to disable only the field and not the label. Even if a field is disabled the user must be able to read its label. This is an example of Bootstrap UI Bootstrap Forms In this example, there is also a mouse indicator, when the user hovers a disabled field


2

how about a border around the box with diagonal stripes. diagonal stripes, similar to construction tape will suggest to the user that this area is not usable at the moment.


2

For me it depends on the needs. There are generally two scenarios.. I want user to continue on another article. I want user to take reference from another article. If its 1st then he is done with current page and so the link should be opening in same tab. If its 2nd then he should be coming back to the current article after taking reference so, the link ...


2

I would refer to this article on CSS Tricks. It list both good and bad instances to open links in a new window (i.e. use target="_blank") Bad reasons Because you like it that way Because you don't want users to ever leave your page To differentiate between "internal" and "external" links Because it links to a PDF Because a client wants it that way Because ...



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