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27

Put on a song that you know, and have someone hit pause and play at random times, then have them randomly turn the volume up and down. Lowering the volume, rather than pausing the music, is less disruptive to the user. Your brain can fill in the gaps in music they are listening to if they are even somewhat familiar with it (it's why people can listen to ...


21

In this situation, I would not use a drop down until you need to. Using a drop down with one option will be annoying to some degree because people will click on it and expect more choices but not find any. Also, people will be trained to not click on that drop down because its 'useless'. You'll have to somehow retrain them to look for the new options ...


12

The only time you should use a dropdown where there is only one available option is: to stay consistent with pages that have many options for the same selection. For example: You are shopping for a new pair of shoes and are currently looking at a style that has sizes 5-14 available. These sizes are displayed in a dropdown. You click on a different style ...


7

thanks for Chris for her bigging up of my talk... Echoing what she said, it's important to make both buttons and fonts big and clear, both for visually-impaired people, as well as those have slight motor control issues, too. The main thing, though, is to be as simple as possible. Never assume that a design feature is 'well-known' or that a heading's ...


7

@robram gave a great talk (video) recently about how he designed the Age UK website. It's ostensibly content strategy, but really ends up being a useful list of how to create online content for older adults. He presents some statistics, such as that over-55s now make up 20% of the online demographic — while these are representative of the UK, not Japan, I ...


7

It makes perfect sense for shipping, as that's a benefit you are providing your customer. But also listing it for taxes seems to dilute the benefit of the term for shipping--after all, not charging taxes is not a benefit you are directly providing the customer (it's something the customer's local government is doing). I'd suggest sticking with numbers ...


6

The choice of which is better is mostly personal. I know some people prefer the one and other people prefer the other. Either one is a fair choice, so ask some of your users and then make a decision on the default behaviour based on their feedback. I would however recommend having an option in your app for how to handle the situation. In addition to ...


5

Here are some that came across my mind: The best practice ever is not letting your system freeze at all. Consider better, more efficient serverside. Of course this cannot be done in some situations, but is a good thing to check at the beginning, because no matter how you tell the user the system is busy, it's always better to show that it just works. If ...


5

You are absolutely right, that current label is very poor. I would recommend Edit Element Although edit by its self would be better, but it does depend on the context. You will find this list of guidelines set out by Microsoft helpful to get your terminology correct. Also see this question as it is related to this but on the subject of Exit. ...


4

Here's another vote for ducking (continuing playback at a lower output level). However, I'll add that in Android, this decision is handled (at least in part) by the interrupting application. When an Android application requests audio focus, it provides a hint to other applications regarding the duration of the sound it is about to play (e.g., short sounds ...


4

That really depends on the users and on what they are typing. Typing on a physical keyboard is significantly faster than on a touch device. So the question then is what the average WPM typing speed of the average user on your system is, and then work backwards from there. Let's say that it is 25 WPM. Typically a word is considered 5 characters long, so ...


4

My approach to this is completely style-guide oriented. The online Oxford Guide Style states: The general rule is not to use a capital letter unless it is absolutely required. The book itself states: Capitalize the first letter of headings and captions. So it appears Sentence Case is the way to go, event for captions.


4

I propose some improvements, based on the usability heuristics. The main issue here is the absence of clear focal point which leads to the convertion task execution. Also the task itself could be fully automated, there no man needed. Just provide FTP address and access parameters to a database. And let it run as batch process.


4

If it’s a permanent setting, so it’s unlikely that users would change it regularly, add it to the settings menu. A user that opens the settings menu and only finds a single setting would hardly be confused (let alone bothered *). Less time configuring, more fun. There is also some value in definitely knowing that there is only one setting. No need to look ...


3

Honestly it depends on the context. Sometimes it makes sense to disable specific UI. This happens regularly with ecommerce websites. Once you submit an order, most ecommerce websites worth their salt disable the "Order Now" button (visually still there, but grayed out, user's cursor changes, loading animation appears in the button, etc) to help prevent ...


3

What you call visual elements are really just the parts that are unique to one application vs. another. The logo, color scheme, and icons are most often unique elements that have to fit into, and often determine to an extent, the style of the website. UI elements are just building blocks that can be used and which are expected to be well known to people ...


3

2 different usage patterns mentioned in the Win 8 UX navigation pattern guidelines: Initial pattern says Back button should take you back to previously visited page and not hierarchy. Header and Back button: The header labels the current page and is useful for wayfinding. The Back button makes it fast to get back to where you were. Further down ...


3

Regardless of the mix of types of data in one table, the data type in the individual column should drive the alignment. Typical alignments (and of course, there are always reasons and ways to do differently) Text and items treated like text: Left Align (caveat: I find numbers always easiest to read rt aligned) Numbers and items treated like numbers: Right ...


3

If you've re-designed UIs for web or other mobile platforms before then you really needn't change your process for Android tablet app design, the same steps apply. You need to identify problem areas then come up with creative solutions that are (preferably) within the Android guidelines using all the usual methods (user journeys, wireframes, personas etc). ...


3

From my experience as an Android user and developer, I've found that there is a big number of apps that don't follow these navigation patterns and the use up as it was back. They don't distinguish between up and back. Up, as the name suggests, should take user one level higher in activities hierarchy. Whereas back should show the screen that was previously ...


3

I've actually just dealt with this subject in a mobile-optimized web-app where the designers were too used to iOS and aligned the title in the center without considering alternatives. One of the advantages of aligning the activity title on the left is mainly that it saves space. It creates a logical cut-off point if the title gets too long or if the screen ...


3

As everyone suggested, please do look at the existing research in the area. That said, here are some suggestions I found on what would be the expected best practices in defining dashboard specific content for automobiles. Ensure content is visible from a distance : Do note that while you would be hoping that your drivers have good eyesight they will have ...


2

Aside from the case that has been made for improved readability, I also argue for sentence case it on the grounds that it's an easier rule to remember for people actually implementing (graphic designers, engineering, writers, etc.). Title case lends itself to all kinds of arbitrary decisions when implementers don't want to be bothered to look up whether ...


2

Title Case for Headings and Buttons It's easier and faster for users if they can to identify the shapes of words. "We recognize words from their word shape." also called the Bouma Shape. Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition Bouma Shape: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition#Bouma_shape A Few Examples ...


2

Rather than a consensus on a static delay, maybe you could look into something a bit more adaptive. For example, if it is rare that a search will be for anything shorter than a few words or a few characters, try to determine the user's words-per-minute rate, or characters-per-second. Once you have these you can trigger a search when there is a significant ...


2

I have experience of three different tools for creating style guides: Confluence The first style guide I implemented was built using Confluence. It was more a design pattern library, containing patterns and best practices for the most common UI design problems. Each pattern contained an example image, description how it works and why it should be used, and ...


2

The main problem with a ribbon on a website is the wide range of devices you (might) need to account for. The obvious problem is it won't work well on a phone size device, the the other problem is the size of a pixel unit (css px, or device pixel) varies greatly depending on the device. I've seen apps that work fine on an iPad but on an iPad mini become ...


2

I don't think that there are any web-specific considerations regarding the use of the ribbon. One somewhat relevant factor is that the ribbon is well-designed for the use of keyboard shortcuts which isn't as common on the web as on the desktop, but otherwise I think that all the usual considerations apply. Actually Balsamiq uses a ribbon-like interface with ...


2

The other answers touch on why/why not, but there are other options available to you. The appropriate control may depend on how many options there will be and how they are generated. Use a radio instead If your options are going to be a fairly short list (1~5), radios will be clear to users who only have one option available and users who have many ...


2

Android is not as hard to work with as people think, it just requires a little more effort! The best place to start looking is the actual Android design guidelines which can be found on the Android developers site but it's designed purely for Android designers. The basics are: Android is broken down into different "versions" which are exactly the same ...



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