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9

In English it is standard practice to capitalize each word in a heading. It looks "wrong" to native English readers. However this is not necessarily the case in other languages. If your target audience are English speakers then the answer is a clear-cut yes. Capitalize Each Word. (There are exceptions but this works as a general rule.) Here is what to ...


8

Yes, the Equalities Act 2010 (previously the Disability Discrimination Act) is such a law in the UK. And it has been used before for prosecuting companies offering poor accessibility (generally for things like offers only being available to fully-sighted people who browse a website with mouse, so users with screenreaders, or only using keyboard can't ...


6

Yes, there are two universally accepted academic UI guidelines: Nielsen usability guidelines and Shneidermann's Also, a you can use the Hicks law and Fitts law. However, you said the "minimum physical size of a touchable UI element" - this is actually wrong because according to the Fitts law the bigger the object the faster a person can reach it. ...


5

Yes, this is a "standard". I am >25 too and I know where to look up this guideline :-) This is guideline 2.3/16 in: Smith S. L., Mosier J. N. (1986) Guidelines for Designing User Interface Software (ESD-TR-86-278), Bedford: The MITRE Corporation | http://www.dfki.de/~jameson/hcida/papers/smith-mosier.pdf Authors provide references to even more older ...


4

I am not a UX designer, however, I am a technologist working in ethical technology and I regularly present at conferences regarding these factors. I also am an NIH-funded clinical researcher, and research ethics are central to my daily work. I believe that UX ethics do differ from the ethics of graphical design as well as design research. First, UX issues ...


3

I would try to promote the benefits of standardization as a process that enforces best practices (things like readability, coherence etc) saves organization time by preventing people from wasting time "being creative" when coming up with solutions to recurring problems (templates are key) sticking to the brand guidelines would ensure consistency, that ...


2

There are certifications bodies and regulators, but they would be industry and/or country specific. Many countries have laws regarding consumer protection, fraud, and spam laws, that regulates the practices of eCommerce operators on that country. The effectiveness of these regulations varies, as eCommerce often sells between borders and regulators may not ...


2

Here is a link to a simple demo It sounds like you have the right idea and here are a couple things to keep in mind. Context is important Place your action buttons in line with the images that will receive them. It is easier to scan and delete an image when the button is close by. Tell the user why an action isn't available Let the user know why ...


2

Just as in all navigation, the key isn't really the amount of options/actions but how understandable they are and how they fit to user's mental model of the application in use and its purpose. As a rule, you need enough categories to adequately represent the scope of information offered on your site or application. Top 3 IA Questions about Navigation ...


2

Arguments for Dimming The main argument on your side is that dimming, rather than strikethrough, is a practically universal standard for deactivated since the 1980s. No one I can think of has ever used strikethrough. You can point to Microsoft, Apple, and Gnome guidelines (e.g., Microsoft’s Windows 10 UX Guidelines for UWP) to substantiate your claim. Web ...


2

I agree with you on all but number 3. I feel like the pop-up window asking if you're sure fits the "Permit easy reversal of actions" principle. Attempting to close a file isn't necessarily an error, however if the user has clicked it by accident, it allows them to change their mind. Simple error handling does fit, in a way, but I believe that the second ...


2

Guidelines are just that: guidelines. They guide the development of your application, they do not make all of the decisions about your application. They document the best thinking about design at the time that the guidelines were written. They help you make a better application by focusing your time and attention on the decisions that matter to your ...


1

It will be better if it mateches with the UI. Its a good UX. For example, when I use Photoshop extensions or plugins, it comes with their own UI, Which makes me think that accidently I opened a different application. If you follow the same UI design guidlines that will sync with the application.


1

I think these are two different problems, not mutually exclusive ones at that. In a product you can design with the data from the user research, regardless of whether the product is data driven or non-data driven. In a data-driven product where users have a need of working with data and operating data visualisations you can display open data or ...


1

Since the context of this solution is medical. Tell them that the strikethrough method comes across quite angry and negative. Considering that the tone of voice for a medical project generally needs to be somewhat human and friendly. This article explains the rationale of branding/design for the medical sector: ...


1

My understanding is that when you say “user interface guidelines” those are platform-specific because user interfaces are platform-specific. When you say “human interface guidelines,” to me, that suggests the Apple books about the Macintosh. However, when you say “usability” that is universal. It covers general principles that make any computing platform ...


1

I have did some research, but me too i haven't find a clear answer. My answer for this question is: For the apple guidelines the black keyboard is not used for indicate a secure form. iOS, being a privacy- and security-first operating system, does place some limitations on custom keyboards. First, by default they have to keep everything local to the ...


1

Numbers in a table should be formatted so that digits with the same significance are stacked vertically. While this is often described as "right alignment" or "decimal alignment", there's another scenario I've not seen mentioned: values which sometimes include fractions. For example, if one is listing the dimensions of some components, which column is ...



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