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12

What standard? Standard for Safari, Mac, Windows, Chrome, w3c, iso ...? Some browsers do this automatically as 'standard'. Some websites add the functionality so it's available in all browsers. But it's not always possible (in all browsers on all platforms) to detect that caps lock is on whilst visiting a website although there is a workaround that ...


8

How about providing a brief message that's displayed right after the action, giving you a chance to reconsider? "You un-friended Jack. You will no longer receive updates from him. Undo?" If the message doesn't open a dialog but appears on the page itself, and it disappears automatically a second later, then it can be very subtle and non-interfering. This is ...


8

I learned a lot from Realm of the Mad God, a web-based MMO game that was recently released. The key takeaway was that they looked at other MMOs in the market, such as World of Warcraft, and identified barriers to entry/play. They then systematically removed them. For instance: No sign up. Click "play" and you're automatically given a mage and put into the ...


7

I haven't heard of a standard either, but I really like the way it is done in Mac OS X. It is very clear. In Windows, there's a warning text message. While this might be easier to understand, it is more obtrusive.


7

From a personal experience, I find FAQs quite useful, specially in services websites (and essential in the case where there are fees and legal issues involved). Advantage is, a FAQ page allows to anticipate questions, which can be translated into spending less time on mails and phone calls, and saving the users time spent hunting for answers. They are quite ...


6

As a senior designer this question makes me cringe. The bottom line is if your service or design NEEDS a walkthrough for people to understand how it works, then the design or service needs to be rethought or deployment delayed until the design is further along. So no - it is not OK to force a user through a walkthrough.


5

One useful site is FiveSecondTest. It's quick and easy (and free) for people to leave comments about your UI. I do believe there is a charge for submitting your own UI designs for feedback though. I have only ever used it to take part in tests, not to get feedback on my own designs so I can't vouch for how useful the feedback recieved is.


5

It seems a spreadsheet-like interface provides good experience for the task. Virtually infinite number of rows – no efforts on line adding, easy navigation, etc. You could mimic some spreadsheet behavior, including: new row auto-appending, as you need a lot of rows and pressing Add row constantly isn't user-friendly easy navigation between rows and ...


4

1280 is quite popular as a resolution today but that doesn't mean you get such a large viewport. It's going to depend on your market. If you have an existing site, I would run some analytics on your most common viewport sizes before going with such a wide site. There are tools out there to give you a heat map on viewed area. That can really go a long way ...


3

Have you considered a graphical way to connect these elements? Check out how Quartz Composer does it: http://sintixerr.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/simplevizjpg-ready.jpg This is how you could set this up through a nodal UI: Using drag and drop, this makes it very easy for the user to create his setup in a super intuitive and fast way. Of course you ...


3

Although I think that yisela is right, IMO FAQs are defective by design, DOA. If users keep asking a question (thus the "F" in FAQ) then it's because something is not well explained somewhere else, and this is wrong because it forces the users to find out their answers in two steps (raise question, find answer), instead of simply not needing any answer (zero ...


3

It depends on when your walkthrough occurs, whether they have an exit path, and whether the user feels like they got any benefit from it. If the walkthrough occurs early in the process of using your service, you're increasing the likelihood that they'll give up entirely on your service and move on. People want to try things out, they don't want to have ...


3

First, consider their point. Is doing something new really the right way to go? If it is then prepare to meet with them. Ask for a meeting. You will need their full attention. If you ask them when they are busy they will go with their gut which is what they always say. Prepare as much data as you can. Analytics, trends, numbers. They run on numbers. ...


3

Use their language instead of forcing your own (UX) terminology on them. Don't believe they understand you if you use UX terminology - they're quite likely to understand something, but more often than not, it's not at all what you meant. Find out what exactly would benefit them if your approach were chosen. Try to work out an approach together, as this ...


3

Undo If that's possible in any way, offer a decent undo function of the operation of the current session / page. In the last decade, the user model has changed from "the user reads the manual and knows what he does, generally" to "the user experiments until he figures out how things work". This is not always possible depending on the data involved (or ...


2

I recommend www.usertesting.com. You get a video of a user talking about your webpage. You choose the questions they answer. Downside is it's a little on the expensive side, at $29-$39 per test. However I think getting feedback from users can be more much helpful that just getting feedback from other designers.


2

We talk about “destructive” actions like Delete and Remove as if they were in a special class requiring special protection. In reality, nearly all actions both create and destroy. Changing my document view for Print to Outline “destroys” one presentation of information for the sake of another. The question to ask is, “how serious are the consequences if the ...


2

You could try something like Object Manager: This panel allows to configure controls easilly with visual support. Also pay attention, there are source (emitters) elements and destination (receivers) elements in your system. So be smart enough to place only receivers into Channel Destination dropdown list. Consider also other restrictions and ...


2

It's NEVER a good idea to force a customer to do anything, whether it's automatic updates or a walkthrough. I hate software that insists on walkthroughs and tend to click through as fast as I can without paying attention, because I prefer to learn a new program by experimenting and using the help files when I get stuck. DO have a walkthrough though that ...


1

It sounds like you’re primarily concerned with real estate (minimizing the space required) and user efficiency (reducing effort), with aesthetics being a secondary concern. As far as I can tell, your design is already pretty close to optimal on all these, and any improvement is mostly trimming and sanding. Real Estate Your design uses just about as little ...


1

The last item could be a placeholder inputs to quickly add a field. I don't know if the example you gave is the final design but I'd suggest to make it easier to read and more accessible by making the inputs larger. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

The current example has a slight contradiction in terms on how the option's input control is shown: for the second option you have the input control at the bottom, while for the third option the input control occupies the entire right panel. This can be confusing as it doesn't seem clear which option affects the interactions with right list control (and I ...


1

If it is really just a walkthrough, there will be users that want to skip it. Not providing them with that option will result in them bashing the next button. One way or the other, these users will 'skip' your walkthough, they'll just end up being more frustrated than they would otherwise be. A way to create an opportunity for providing walkthrough-type ...


1

is it ok to force users through a brief walkthrough when you know it will benefit them in the end? Yes, without a doubt it's OK for the employer to "force" them to take training that will improve their work. While it's ideal to make software so obvious and simple that no coaching or instruction will add value, in reality that's very rare. There's the ...


1

You don't necessarily need an extensive walk-through, it can be a short introduction on how things work. I found the new Spotify instructions quite interesting and non-invasive. Once you install the program, it shows you 3 simple steps to start listening to music (I think it was Search, Play and Create a playlist). Linkedin does something similar, ...


1

A question I would ask: "Why do your users protest going through the walk through"? Do they not find it useful? Is it boring? Do they already know the information? Is it unexpected? Are you asking for more than you are giving? They feel a loss of control? Is the language hard to read? Did they have a bad morning? You get the idea. As others have ...


1

I was trying to think of times when the answer would be yes. My thoughts are if it is a public site that does not have a captive audience then no, forcing the users to do anything they don't need to do for vital reasons is not good. On the other hand for systems that a user is going to use on a repeated basis, such as every day, that is not overly ...


1

iOS has a defined UX guidelines, I would go with them. This is what it has to say about modals: Modality is most appropriate when: It’s critical to get the user’s attention. A task must be completed (or explicitly abandoned) to avoid leaving the user’s data in an ambiguous state. If you feel your situation relates to these terms, then a ...


1

Instead of displaying a warning when Caps-Lock is on you could switch the letters if the first password fail first checking pASSWORD1234 and then Password1234 allowing the user to login as the user did input the right password, just mistakenly with a locked in modifier. As Patrick McElhaney's edit to this answer clarified I'm not at all suggesting we should ...


1

You might want to do this, but only if the user has guessed his password wrong once already -- I believe this is how Windows normal login works, or worked at some point, at least. This way, you can protect users who use the caps lock key to type in their passwords (intentionally) from people with wandering eyes.



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