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1

I would suggest you to read this paper : An Estimate of a User Learning Curve on Web-Based interface Using Eye Tracking Equipment I am unsure if there is any specific research to check if custom Form elements need a higher learning curve. But It is obvious that a user will take time to adapt to any new elements. In simple words the best interface is one ...


1

I've used Twitter Bootstrap button groups in the past for this same idea. Since they are actually buttons, and not parts of a slide, I don't think the selected states are confusing (and you can style them to be as unambiguous as you want). I think the bigger question to ask is whether it meets your needs and what you are trying to solve by implementing ...


0

To be honest you probably shouldn't be using a toggle if you have more than 2 states - a toggle by it's nature is an either / or switch - that's why you're having this problem. For your application it would depend on the number of states and the context, but most mobile OS handle drop lists very well. A series of Radio buttons would be another solution.


2

The table is distracting because of: High contrast between the buttons and the tables. Grid layout of the buttons creates an unfortunate grid illusion The palette is visually distracting: you have banded rows already, and then are superimposing a saturated darker blue. That's a lot to deal with when the eye already has trouble navigating a complex table ...


4

Buttons tend to convey actions, while it looks to me more like these are navigation links. Showing them just as regular links (following whatever style in your app) would be probably be much less imposing both visually and as an action to take. You can also take this a step further, and provide some more useful information instead of simply displaying ...


2

Are all 4 buttons equally important? It might make sense to have the main action as a full button and tuck the rest into a button dropdown. It'll make it easier for users to tell which is the main action and still have the rest be accessible is a touch friendly fashion. The second thing you can look at is button color. The blue is very strong against the ...


0

The simple answer is to use a combobox like the following: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

The primary usability aspect I see here is returning to the previous location. While technically it does not make a difference, a popup communicates this to the user: "Once we are done with this little hassle, you will fall back to where you were before". I would also expect a popup to indicate "this will be over quickly". The first doesn't matter for ...


0

This varies from website to website based on the amount of data you want to capture on registration form, among other factors. Sites like reddit offer a quick popup window to capture data which is just a username and password, but sites like Paypal which might have drawn out registration process comprising of various steps, credit card information etc will ...


0

A clear way to demonstrate groupped locations in a full size map is to provide a fix positioned list of your groups in a corner of the map, each group name has a color, assign that color to the pins related to each of those group names, default transparency for pins must be about 50-60%. Then once you clicked on a group name, the group name title can get ...


2

Most travel websites suck when it comes to anything other than single guests or couples, especially with children. In many cases, you have to special case kids even more: Infants usually don’t count, but may require a crib. Toddlers may stay for free if sleeping in bed with their parents, but sometimes have to pay for breakfast, though probably not full ...


2

Consider how AirBnB shows the maximum number of guests allowed in a location. They start by asking the user to put in their number of guests. If it's missed here, the user can change it on the next screen, where they have the same dropdown as on the previous search. This time though, the results will dynamically update as the user changes their number of ...


0

The problem with percentages is, the numeric value should correspond to something. I mean, if you have say 39%, how is it different from 42%. Is it a significant change? (This puts a pressure on polling logic as well, considering there are 100 steps for each place needs to be synced and notified. This is a technical aspect but may have an effect on ...


0

In addition to the ones you list: Position Size Rotation Color You could list many, many more: typeface type/icon weight brightness contrast pattern animation opacity shadow/border etc


0

In same real world applications you use multi-select drop-down list implementation because: -as you said "there isn't always a lot of space available" -The user doesn't know the items in the list... Regarding that, I'll show you an example: Here the user has a list of unknown file types coming from the server dynamically, so there is no option to use ...


1

Thoughts on drop-down lists: I think all dropdown including the multi-select lists have probably reached the end of the line. Their versatility also proved to be their Achilles heel: Drop-down menus are often more trouble than they are worth and can be confusing because Web designers use them for several different purposes. Also, scrolling menus ...


0

You ask about multiple select dropdown but picture a multiple select list You cite as a reason you could not find multi select dropdown You don't find multi select dropdown because in a collapsed state a dropdown does not depict multiple selections. A drop down is poor UI for multi select for this reason. As for List versus a select like SO the ...


1

Yes it is. You shouldn't rely on your drag and drop functionality as the only way to upload files. I agree it is an 'advanced' features which many users don't know. Many users are clumsy with there mouse, so dragging a file across the screen can be hard, especially on trackpads! But in many cases, this method is a way faster. You ask 'Aren't users ...


0

Nielsen Norman Group wrote a great article about mega menus - I'm not sure if it addresses your particular needs or not, but they do say that drop down menus are user friendly, so long as they are multi-dimensional and robust, instead of just a block of text. They also mention the use of tags and tag clouds in that article, so I hope it's relevant to your ...


1

There's not much information in your question, so my answer might be vague, or my assumptions incorrect, but let's try... Assuming the app has a standard set of "controls" (labels, text input, spinners, radio and check boxes), not much will be gained by enlarging them. For example, you should not enlarge the font size with the window size. Your user will ...


0

Use the chart to tell a story, without a story the chart just shows the data that’s already in the table, but then in a less readable way. I can only make a guess what that story should be, but I assume that it is about telling the difference between the total of emails that were attempted to be sent, the amount of sent/received emails and the ones that got ...


1

Assuming in most cases you have a smallish set of species. Consider something like a wysiwyg editor: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This pretty much supports everything tohster mentioned. Your species list is right next to the field for easy access. Submit / Action buttons can be placed right below your fields. ...


1

This is a business/technical and not a consumer app so I'm going to assume that effectiveness is more important than beauty in the UX. Improve the visual flow. Currently the workflow has users starting from the top left, working down the fields (flipping to the right of the screen to add species), then going to the bottom-right to submit the form. This ...


0

Stacked bar charts might also work, especially if you want to visually compare multiple campaigns. But I agree that the labels/values shown in your pie chart might not be helpful to the end users. Some people might consider a bounce a failure. Clarification on the data set will help you determine which chart type is most appropriate.


4

There are several features you can use, which may be combined if appropriate: Status bar. A status bar in the window can indicate that the process is underway or not. Ideally, the status bar will include a progress bar and/or percent done and/or estimated time remaining. If possible, place the status information in the corner of the window so the user can ...


1

It seems like you're missing data about what users want to see. Rough guess of what it might be and thing to approach target group with for further feedback and insights of their needs: Some comparsion of recipient groups sizes. Anyhow. Just a number could be enough. See a pie chart for recipients (100%). This would display successfully sent emails (80%) ...


0

Hierarchical pull downs across the top Consider State, County, City First all I see is state After you select a state then to the right you get to select county and it only present counties in that state Then city If you have parish in some counties then parish before city Texas Texas Harris Texas Harris Houston I change state then county ...


0

1. Less is more Trying to fit more stuff on a single page isn't the goal of providing a good UX. Figure out what the primary task at hand is and only show that. If additional details are needed in rare cases then hide those until the user requests them by clicking a show advanced options toggle button. "Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing ...


1

Overall, it seems that it was a design choice by Jony Ive and his design team, however it does seem to be a very hot button topic and a confusing one at that. As you can see below, they do provide some kind of feedback, however it blends in with the other keys making it hard to understand what is happening. The folks over at Future Workshops did a quick ...


0

I would say that Apple was going for consistency across all languages with this change by making active keys black with white background which has the highest contrast (true if you hold the backspace down as well though it's hard to see because your finger is on it) The more user friendly solution is simple. Show lowercase letters on the keys when the ...


4

I don't like tree views, but sometimes they really are the most appropriate widget. Before you write the tree view off, it's worth thinking about whether it can be redesigned better for tablets. 1. Issues with tree views The drop-down icons are usually too small. They're hard to click even on desktops, let alone on tablets (see Fitt's law). Idea Can ...


2

1. This is a well-trodden problem Digital designers have been grappliing with this problem since scheduling, project management, and manufacturing planning apps were written in the 80's. 2. Graphical representation is non-trivial When you have multiple, arbitrary dependencies, it becomes very difficult to show dependencies graphically. A simple ...


2

Information redundancy is fine Could you imagine an internet that didn't allow anything to repeat ever? Repeating the same information on different screens or pages is perfectly fine as long as it is relevant to the current task at hand. Information overload is not fine Having a single page that focuses on a single task or call to action reduces ...


0

I would probably reverse the order of the columns in your first table and maybe even call them Prerequisites -- things that are required before doing this task. Something like this...


0

In your example, instead of displaying tasks 2 and 3 vertically, you can display them side by side, in more of a flow chart representation, and they both connect independently to task 4. This may get cumbersome depending on how many tasks you're visualizing. There may need to be more cues, such as shape and color to help organize a large array of tasks.


2

I checked every app on my phone and didn't see anything other than dropdowns. I think you're on the right track with sliders, actually. I put an idea together that I thought could work. I'm sure something like this exists “out there” somewhere, but I haven't seen it. I think the goal is one finger gesture for “went to sleep”, one for “woke up” and one to ...


0

I have seen this done quite well using the UI below: By selecting a node in the tree then clicking the arrow it directs the selected node to the selected view. Forgive the quick mockup!


0

If you really, really, really have to use a tree view with hundreds of nodes, then it needs to be just that: a very basic tree view and absolutely nothing more. Sometimes this situation is unavoidable. A tree view is often used for expert users who want to be able to navigate a complex hierarchy quickly, without waiting for page reloads. In this ...


0

I may not solve your problem with the following approach, but I am fairly certain that the current implementation is overwhelming to the user. It adds a lot of performance issues. It is also hard to comprehend if I want to have a look at more data in one go. Let us start with 80:20 rule. When I design something, I generally make sure that my solutions ...


1

Consider yourself to be a very rich man. So rich that there's a fridge attendant in your house whose only role is to open and close the fridge: You come home one day and approach the fridge, saying loudly "Oh, I'm starving". The attendant picks the cue and opens the fridge. At this point you may pick something from inside. Regardless, you perform an ...


3

In most cases, dismissing the modal keyboard on a non-modal (or "click outside") tap provides a better user experience. Here's why: Slide-in keyboards are very intrusive. They occupy an enormous amount of the screen, even on tablets, and even if the form isn't occluded by the keyboard, user perceive a physical sense of intrusion when the keyboard shows ...


2

The interface element is called a ribbon. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribbon_(computing) Since Microsoft popularized the term, the Microsoft ribbon is the canonical example of this interface type. If you need to refer specifically to the Microsoft style of ribbon I have not heard designers use any term other than "the Office [insert specific version] ...


0

The Nielsen Norman Group has a report on the subject. Unfortunately it's behind a paywall. http://www.nngroup.com/reports/ecommerce-ux-product-pages-including-reviews/ They have some generic articles as well. Example: Reviews can answer questions or address concerns that users have about the product, because they’re written from the perspective of ...


1

Computer graphics simply refers to graphics created and viewed using computers, so that is simplest. For User Experience (UX), User Interface/Interaction (UI), Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and related terms, the following diagram from this quora question may help: The diagram is not definitive, but it's pretty helpful. HCI is the practice and ...


0

Maybe you could handle this design pattern like a disabled button. A button you can't interact with is grayed out. The same might go for your readonly row. You should go for the solid, unmoving look. Grayed out makes it look it's set in stone, solid and unmoving. In this case you just have to make sure it's still readable. Also, no hover states on the ...


0

look at how for example facebook handles this: first they show you what the website can and might access and under that it shows you what it cant do. this order is important so the user understands what he accepts when giving you his information and what he doesnt need to worry about when accepting the form. http://i.imgur.com/0Y92Zxo.png sorry this is ...


4

I would propose a third option. Make the button and image clickable It has become a convention that images are clickable on websites and in applications. My personal experience with this is during my time at a webshop where user research pointed out that almost 70% clicked the image of the product in a list of products in order to navigate to the product ...


0

Your clickable area doesn't have to be bigger than it needs to be to actually click, taking into account the size of fingers and the fact that some people don't have the motor skills with mice and fingers. From this article we see guidelines raging from 28px (Nokia) to 44px (Apple) but the article goes on to quote research here and here that shows the larger ...


1

Your question is one that Intuit has put a lot of time and effort into putting into practice with its TurboTax UI, where parent activities are done first, and child forms take care of the rest. The entire procedure of necessary work has been (as far as I can tell without being involved in its design) ordered from parent-to-child. As you may realize, children ...


4

Interesting question. Yes, grammars do exist for UI design, but no, I haven't seen one as high level as what you are describing. Templating systems like jinja2 and django implement grammars for domain-specific languages (DSL's) which are well adapted to describing UI's. But these grammars are highly specialized and more focused on concrete implementation ...



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