New answers tagged

0

Use the titles: Country, Region and Province (or whatever is appropriate) so users can click on these titles to see the pertinent list of Countries, Regions or Provinces. It will take space, but it's the only sensible way to offer the ability to navigate through your tree AND select within the tree, instantly.


0

How about something like this? comma will end sequence and convert it to a UI with background. Inside the sequence, the individual items (which are seperated by a [space]) are converted into UI items with background. Moving a cursor onto a sequence will remove the BG from the sequence, indicating the sequence is currently being edited. Moving the Cursor ...


2

While this is quite subjective, there are some guidelines on color based on frameworks or design philosophies. A very common one nowadays is Material Design Colors, which basically uses a primary color, a secondary color, and an accent, mixed with shades and tints. Similarly, Apple Color Guidelines are a must read resource since it has more theory, which in ...


0

My guesses are that on the main screen your users will need to have recent chats. Let's say that personal chats are more important than conversations with companies. It means that we need to make a focus on personal chats and put it on the main screen. For contact book, I propose to separate screen with all existing contacts into two sections People and ...


1

In Material Design this interaction pattern/component is referred to as a Leave-Behind. See reference here:https://www.google.com/design/spec/components/lists-controls.html#lists-controls-types-of-list-controls Leave-behinds A leave-behind is an informative hint as to what swiping a list item away will do to that item. The leave-behind can ...


0

You should realize that there might be very specific reasons why those arrows are placed where they are on the screen, and those reasons might not fit with your purpose. The other thing is that without a sensible scale or idea of the number of items and the exact frequency and context of usage, it will be hard to determine what the optimal option might be ...


0

Well, I'd go with your 3rd option, only that on the right. Since most people is right handed, that will prevent your users have to go across your element every time they want to interact with it. And having your buttons close together requires minimum effort to scroll up and down. I did a very quick sample to visually explain the concept and how you reduce ...


4

Wireframing and prototyping are exceptionally useful and underused tools in the tech world. Website and app wireframes are useful to determine the layout and overall look and feel of each screen or page. Prototyping is an effective tool for validation and as a way to test your development company. Wireframing Wireframing is probably the most well ...


0

Don't know about "ignore" icons, but "dismiss" and "mark as read" icons are used a lot elsewhere. Facebook uses an icon for "Mark as read" notification actions and text to "Mark all as read", while Google uses icon for both actions. Doesn't seem to be a best practice scenario, you can get the idea from those examples.


1

Perhaps you should break down your features into separate pages. You should focus on doing one task per page since mobile device has limited screen estate. Doing one task only also has the benefit of simplifying the app and reduce the cognitive load on the user to learn your app. This is a very typical layout for a messaging app. The contact list should ...


0

Each of the bullet points you've listed above describe distinct user tasks and goals. You need to think about which tasks require which interface elements. Start by identifying which tasks will be carried out most; to prioritize a task ask the these questions: how often is the task done? How many users do this task? Based on your answers, you can prioritize ...


0

I think the important thing to understand here is what was your "intent " while designing the said UI ? If there was a clear intent, it would lead to testable hypothesis. If not, i really have no idea what you would really be testing or even designing in the first place. Read more here - ...


1

I question the need for your double row of tabs here. The user gains no additional utility from this layout, especially if they wish to compare data and information across sections of your program. Let's say that your user is looking at data in the Report Details page of your Work Orders section, and wishes to compare information there to information ...


1

If you want to avoid any confusion, what you really should do is to separate the two pieces of information that you are trying to show, which is A) Trend status and B) Goal status. Because the trend is relative to previous dataset(s) and the goal is absolute to a given number (at least that's what I would assume), it is easy to misinterpret the information ...


-4

It's this way to prevent you from doing disastrous things. Replace should be disabled and never used. If you worked with XCode and Swift for a while you will realize that the missing refactoring methods for Swift are actually a blessing. They force you to think ahead of naming stuff right, so you won't need refactoring/renaming. For normal (non Swift) IDEs ...


7

Since the issue is the relative position of the bar, you could try fixing the bar by keeping it in the middle. Something like this : It also has the advantage of representing the fact that the goal is fixed and not moving, while your performance is.


2

Find is sensible with a non-modifiable document. Replace is not. Historically, was "replace" greyed-out or not displayed in read-only mode? Maybe back when there was only space for one copy of the document on the 720k floppy disk? These days, it's normal that the document's text is always modifiable and it's the file that is not, So it is "Save" that is ...


16

Both Find and Find and Replace are related functionally as you mention. But both actions seem to be orthogonal in terms of what user need (mindset) they cater to. You will know in advance either you want to find something or you rather want to substitute occurrences of something. In the latter case it just happens that you need to find occurrences of the ...


0

There's a lot of history to text editors. e.g. vi which is one of the oldest separated these out as there is a defined split between viewing a document (find) and editing a document (replace). In technical terms they're quite different things, like GET vs POST for the web, and text editors are typically quite technical tools. Word Processors less so but I ...


8

If you can expect your users to be power text editor users, for example programmers, then it makes sense to combine these dialogs into one, or, even better, make it a toolbar and show real-time results as you type. This is an expected feature for development tools nowadays, as it speeds up the editing process greatly. IDEs (integrated development ...


4

I see this as new behaviour. Without an old install of MSOffice to test I can't be absolutely sure, but in the past find/replace dialog boxes were often modal, and covered quite a lot of text. For find only tools this isn't necessary - they tend to have 2-4 controls of which only one is a text box (wide). Replace requires at least another text box and ...


0

This is a perfect example of the importance of including the user in the user experience design. The contributions from the experts on this site and very valuable and will help you a ton, but getting input from the actual users as early as possible in any design situation will highlight important details early and avoid you having to try and retro-design ...


0

Well the option is not easy see it. Maybe an better approach will be have an compact menu with some simple actions, so the user could enter to an process: start action -> configure -> done.


0

I agree there needs to be a more visual indication of the change. Perhaps that component breaks out of the bottom bar to draw extra attention to it. Something like this: An additional improvement would be to make the transition to the active state animated, or have the yellow bar pulse. Once the changes have been applied it would return to normal.


58

An interesting question, and one that I think many of us might have pondered before without really diving too deep into the possible issues. From a purely design perspective, I can think of a number of plausible reasons: Convention: the first person did it this way, and then everybody else followed because "that's how it's done". Safety first: separating a ...


13

My father has late-stage PD and after watching him use his Mac for the last 15 years here are some thoughts in no particular order: Assume the user can't use both hands or combinations of keys. My father uses his non-dominant hand with a track-ball because it shakes less, but has to use the keyboard and click with the same hand. Try that one out yourself ...


0

It's small and dark. Instead, why don't you change the background colour/color of the "changes" label, that would effective hightlight it.


0

It could be useful to explore an alternative voice input. If a user has trouble pressing a control is there another way they could do it with voice? Could there a big voice activation control on each screen? I agree with another comment that it would be really useful to test the app with people with Parkinson's.


5

I think you should go a week or so using some of the peripherals that these patients would use. You probably know UX as you experience the web, but you should get to know the challenges that they face when they're not using a mouse and a screen. They might have a hard time reading on the screen because of the shaking, so maybe they use a screen reader with ...


28

People with Parkinson Disease (or PD as it's also known) need special considerations as you correctly figured. However, keep in mind that most of those considerations are covered by special peripherals rather than specific UI. As a matter of fact, just following common WAI- ARIA guidelines is more than enough. Keep in mind that, like many people with ...


0

I would give larger hit areas than we would for regular users as parkinson's patients experience tremors. Maybe try to simulate that with a shaking screen and try to use the interface yourself to experience how useable it in in that state. The best way would be to test out your interface on your target users and to adjustments based on your feedback.


3

I'm going to lift a quote from an answer over at DesignerNews: Framer, After Effects, Cheetah 3D (yes, really!), Hype, Photoshop (for hacky GIFs), Quartz Composer and Form are all worth taking a look at. On top of that, not from personal experience but from asking around myself, I've found "After Effects" to be the answer very, very often. There are ...


0

My favourite is Coggle.it. In there users can design complex graphs, add annotations, categorise with color and other things. Part of my notes for the Gamification course.


1

It is a good idea given that a product image alone is sufficient for the user to follow your recommendations. It'll work for cloths but might not be effective for hardware. The latter example will require adding some detail. And the presented design will struggle if you have anything more than a line of extra text below each image. Assuming that image alone ...


4

Summary: Carousel control has some drawbacks on mobile. More straightforward solution could work better. Still, A/B test is the best way to evaluate the idea. Some consideration on using carousel control: Interaction style People interact with a mobile in a specific way. You can find some insights in the How Do Users Really Hold Mobile Devices? ...


1

Nothing wrong with the good old decision tree diagrams: e.g. http://www.collegehumor.com/post/6883988/where-should-you-post-that-thing-you-want-to-share


3

If you're looking for user friendly, then browser's back button should suffice, it's a known and expected behavior, and for one level navigation, it's what most users will look for. Now, if you want to keep context, you could use a modal window, but that will also depend on the content you have for those services and also the kind of behavior you're looking ...


0

Are the users going to check out several services? If so going back and forth can be cumbersome. Maybe you could use a modal window with a close window. You could even allow the users to navigate between services with arrows or thumbnails. If they aren't gonna check several I wouldn't bother with a back button, I would rely on the menu and the ...


1

You can use "breadcrumbs" which is very common and useful. It takes less space(unless you style it heavily) and users can easily navigate to various pages.


2

I agree with your third approach - but I think the way to remove your concern about importance is to use a clearer visual hierarchy on your calls to action buttons. At the moment, all three of your CTAs are look the same, so the user will see them as equal importance. If you make them visually distinctive, you can make it clear what is the primary CTA ...


3

I would put this on a comment but I don't have enough reputation. In your case I believe the problem is you don't have a good UI for the small actions defined and want to solve it through keyboard shortcuts. Maybe you could rethink the whole process, simplify it an then think again about the shortcuts? Why does it take so many clicks? How many panels can ...


0

Don Norman (author of The Design of Everyday Things) has a great quote that seems to cover this: "When a device as simple as a door has to come with an instruction manual — even a one-word manual — then it is a failure, poorly designed." Use gestalt techniques to add a layer of meaning and context to your controls and on-boarding sequences that show ...


0

There are ways in which you can manage user's learning curve. It should be noted that a learned user should not feel that the UI is cluttered with information which she no longer needs. Onboarding UI This is a very common recent trend. When user signs up or logs in for the first time, she is shown a help overlay which helps understanding the UI metaphor. ...


0

In an ideal world we will design a solution that is so obvious that everybody will instinctively know how to use it. In the real world there are a number of factors that can influence whether additional information will be valuable or not: Frequency. Is this something people will use once or lots of time? Importance. Is there a chance the user will make ...


0

For the first time visitors, it is a good practice to tell them what features lies where and how that feature can be used for a pleasant experience. However, it depends on the type of users of your application. If technologically sound people are the target audience, I don't see a need to show description; as they are experienced users and they know what ...


3

In a similar line to the nyt solution for a more complex diagram I would, for every answer, write a sentence( do you like green - yes - no // you like green) And when the user makes a choice put them on clickable cards on the top as you would breadcrumbs. This way you can have the question centered, allowing the user to focus on the choices being made, ...


0

Having worked on a variety of web and app mapping UI, I would recommend using decimal degrees for the input. It's increasingly rare for sources to provide alternative formats. You may consider, however, if space and circumstances permit, offering an option of changing to another format. (Perhaps the user could even be allowed to set this as a default). I ...


0

Taking bits and pieces from other's answers, as well as getting some additional feedback from the users (who said they would be okay with a single textbox at the end of each section), here are two more mockups: Using button groups Using a radio table (view in Codepen)


1

Optimize navigation Make sure users could logically tab through each control and make selections without the mouse. I think it could also help if each dropdown supports type ahead to pick faster Consider Templates? Allow users to save the object description as a named template. Next time user could just pick the template and all of the fields could be ...


0

For the case where data is the same between the objects I'd recommend that instead of going through each single object individually you enable users to first select multiple objects and then catalogue all of them in one go. If the data varies slightly between the objects you could remember selections from the previous go, and possibly put all the options in ...



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