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0

The simplest way to do this that I can think of would be to pull (and compile, possibly) the two different commits into two different development environments then compare the parts of the interface effected by the commits. You could take this a step further and automate the process, interfacing with a commit history and triggering using batch files or ...


0

You have talked about what you want the user to do, but you haven't described it in terms of what your user actually wants to accomplish. Your user does not want to input anything. They might have to input something as a means to their end. You haven't described their end. "A summary of stock performance over time" also isn't the user's goal. It might ...


0

I would very much like to have a TV remote with a curved touch pad similar of that to the Steam controller (http://www.engadget.com/products/valve/steam-controller). It would give you varying degrees of speed and would even enable a cursor on the screen for more advanced features.


1

One of the first things to do when attempting to design a UI is to determine what information you need to display to the user, and I know this sounds like a no-brainer, but it's actually a very important step. Once you have a list of this (for you something like "stocks, return, time period, etc.") you can begin to see how the different data sets or ...


0

Design trend + 2 Heuristics at play: Match between system and the real world Newer users don't need extreme analogies, as they grew up with digital concepts as evident in nature. Aesthetic and minimalist design Less clutter means sharper focus on tasks at hand. No frivolous design elements to interfere.


1

Could the answer be that (like number 4) things are now on tables? Computer screens sat on tables and walls in front of you and you looked "out of/through" them. Think of the XP fields. The metaphor was one of a window, and postive light, and the light fell (in the wrong direction) on drop-shadow buttons. You were looking out and depth was important and ...


1

This question is similar to something I recently implemented which has had success. Because I am unaware of the time required to process the request your users are clicking - I will try to give a few broad options. I will try to give answers that do not require building a dashboard or a completely new UI. Cost can drive up quickly doing so. The link ...


1

The Unavailable mouse pointer is always an option that's understood my millions of Windows users:


2

Here's another approach: I work in e-commerce and one possible solution to your additional info in a grid problem could be solved with how we display more info about our product on the product listing page. If you think of a product grid as a cell in your spreadsheet. In order to see more info about a product (in this case your cell), a pane could slide ...


1

Some ideas: After clicking the link, disable it so it can't be clicked again. Enable it again when it makes sense for it to be clicked again (if the process completes or fails). Display an indicator near the link to show that the process is in progress. This could be a simple spinner or throbber, a loading bar, a "please wait" message, etc. When the ...


1

Ideas for you: User clicks on a link and a mini "request sent" status gets displayed next to the link If user stays on the page/page gets refreshed, the status next to the link updates to show the current status If user performs a lot of these long process time actions, consider putting together a dashboard where they can review status of all processes in ...


3

Don't move my cheese I think this is a classic problem where the developers who've created these tools haven't been able to anticipate how their applications are going to be used. When you can anticipate everything, you're able to design a great UX on the first try. But that just isn't happening here. And then as features are added, they don't bother ...


2

Being a developer in PHP, Android, C# and working professionally with SharePoint I can only applaud this question. In many developing languages and IDEs it sometimes looks like someone came up with an idea and it was implemented as a button, a menu item or a keyboard shortcut. Without thinking of that this feature will actually be used by someone. Sometimes ...


2

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


1

This complex interface has two layers, both of which are complex in themselves. A primary and secondary layer if you like. Using a popup is a good start but there are several ways you can make this easier to use: Highlight the cell that they are operating on and consider using that as the trigger to open the popup, or highlight and the enter key, meaning ...


0

In a similar case, I used a tooltip instead of a poppin. You just have to roll-over a cell for more than 1 sec to see the additional information. You can even add a link if you need to go to another page download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

Two simple suggestions for you: Display some form of loading image at the side of the button, indicating that there is some processing going on. This will ensure that the user does not click on the button multiple times for fear that the button is not working. Once done, you can easily hide this loading image. Change the text of the button to 'loading...' ...


6

If the user is very likely to want see the more-info details you could find it worthwhile to go to a fixed master-child UI layout, similar to illustrated. This provides affordance and fixed positioning for data. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note details area could be positioned at right hand side of ...


13

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


0

Not knowing the context of use makes it fuzzy to come up with a solution. Here is what I can come up with: How about selecting the raw and the column separately? Here is what I am trying to explain: the user selects the column they want to get the data then selects a row. When the raw and the column are selected, the extra pop-up can appear. ...


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The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


2

Rather than using a popup, which can get problematic on small devices, I'd suggest to display the additional information below and inside the affected row. The example in the image shows what I'm trying to describe. It usually a grid with various album names. The song names of the album appear when you click the link (in the example it's clicking on Sleep Is ...


0

My advice would be to add a row at the top of your grid with the information for the user to click in the grid squares to see the additional info in pop ups. In my experience it is better for the user to see the instruction to get more info first, rather than have them figure out where it is or stumble upon what to do to get it.


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


2

how about a border around the box with diagonal stripes. diagonal stripes, similar to construction tape will suggest to the user that this area is not usable at the moment.


2

For me it depends on the needs. There are generally two scenarios.. I want user to continue on another article. I want user to take reference from another article. If its 1st then he is done with current page and so the link should be opening in same tab. If its 2nd then he should be coming back to the current article after taking reference so, the link ...


2

I would refer to this article on CSS Tricks. It list both good and bad instances to open links in a new window (i.e. use target="_blank") Bad reasons Because you like it that way Because you don't want users to ever leave your page To differentiate between "internal" and "external" links Because it links to a PDF Because a client wants it that way Because ...


0

This is more of an algorithmic problem, but it is worth keeping in mind that some languages do not have the distinction of upper- and lowercase. E.g. Japanese (they also don't have the concept of bold text). And some letters do not exist in an uppercase variant, e.g. the German "ß" ('sharp S') is a strictly lowercase letter1 as there are no words that start ...


5

There are very few advantages to using all caps, and that is why we usually don't. When we read text, largely what our brains are doing is recognizing the overall shape of words, rather than the individual letters. Lowercase letters have different sizes and visual densities; some have ascenders sticking up, or descenders sticking down. This means that ...


0

Tables in Bootstrap are not pretty. Bootstrap provides a table class, but in my experience it breaks on phones, allowing the table to leave the right side of the screen. I find it best to build your table using Bootstrap's CSS framework, utilizing the row + col structure; in your case, one row and three col-md-4's. Your "Bigger field" would be in its own ...


2

My suggestion would be to use a tool-tip If the description or additional details are of a smaller size, you can use the title attribute to display the information when the user hovers over the column header If you require a consistent experience, you can implement a custom tool-tip


2

I could not resist. Here is my try to separate UIs into separate dimensions. There is a Good/Bad axis on every bullet. - Content Quality | Sources | Refinement - UI Components Adequation with need | Interaction quality | Follows conventions - Visual Style Trend | Visual appealance | Colors | Shape - Navigation Style Workflow | mechanics type ...


2

To add my 2 cents At the higher level, interface types seem more difficult to efficiently name. Three examples, taken out from a thousand possible others, illustrate an almost infinite variety : I use just this two at highest level: Marketing / information page Workflow / application page Skype for iOS (recent release) and its elastic and ...


0

I posted the question so that there is a live, working reference in the Internet. After doing it my first impression was that it's annoying and should be considered bad practice. For the problem of selecting text with narrow letters, I think the answer is to use bigger fonts. Bigger, more plump fonts seems to be the fashion in this age of touch apps anyway. ...


0

Don't do this because what you see is not what you get. If I click a point on the text where I want to start typing, I end up typing in the wrong place when the font changes. Similarly, if I hover my cursor over a letter and start dragging, the text expands and I end up selecting the wrong letters. While you could do a bunch of coding to translate the ...


1

I think this is a great effort and a challenging problem to solve, but I think this solution may be annoying (to use your words). Here's why: When I go to click to highlight a letter or section of text the cursor jumps to a different section. PS. That's a cool article even if its 14 years old!


1

You can use an icon that represents the theme of awarding, and put the score inside it. For example, something this can be used..


0

iOS calls them pickers Visually, instead of a drop-down select, it's a spinner of options on small devices. On larger devices (such as an iPad) it may render a more traditional drop-down. Aternatively you can use a table view as miller columns.


0

Why do you need a dropdown on iOS? Dropdowns are incredibly hard to interact with on mobile (iOS or Android). I'd suggest an alternative pattern like a picker or as Paul mentioned, Drill Down Lists (a series of Table views, for multiple selection)


1

iOS makes it much easier to use Drill Downs or "Pickers". These may work depending on what you need the "Dropdown" to do. See: https://developer.apple.com/library/iOS/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/mobilehig/Controls.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40006556-CH15-SW1


1

One idea, if applicable based on your data set and architecture, could be to have : one single quick search field using predictive typing and live refresh of search results. Your users could then start typing, say, "repl 113" and the predictive typing would suggest "replenishment" as they type the "l" (in real time during typing, so difficult to render ...


0

The Summary grid should have different UI colors giving it a look of inactive thing. The Summary grid displays the actual grid's data, so 'Clear' option will go only with actual grid.


1

I'm glad to join the StackExchange's UX community and this is my first UX-related answer. Without going into much details, nicely covered by prior answers, I just wanted to fill the knowledge gap by emphasizing one obvious, but often overlooked, aspect. The aspect, which, I think, radically influences the set of dimensions expected in an answer to this or ...


0

While it's not your problem to solve, one suggestion would be to remove the "channel up/down" buttons from the guide's navigation key set. Force the user to navigate exclusively with the arrow pad, which would eliminate your perceived confusion. Another option would be to change the label dynamically. When the guide is showing, hide the word "channel", ...


2

I find this to be more a philosophical question. To classify each type of interface is more likely a combination of terms. We would first have to think of all the different classifications that can be applied. There are some great examples listed above and choosing one would the first step. For instance, is it a website or a web application. What are the ...


0

Since your context is people and landscapes I would go with the latter for the following reasons: The letter-boxing is ugly (well, I think so), especially when a group of images is viewed as it takes away from their uniformity. Ugly or not it is certainly distracting. For landscapes it will not particularly matter if part is cropped. It will still ...


1

Lately I have been thinking about two primary categories when creating an interface; 'interaction approach' and 'content style'. Subcategories of each help to define a UX strategy and interface. Interaction approach I find it helpful to first classify the interaction approach of an interface as 'exploratory' or 'direct'. I don't mean to imply that an ...


0

Why branch to 2 different options? Just generate the "template" name automatically, and leave it up to the user if they want to immediately click save, or if they want to edit the name before saving. Workflow: User chooses folder User presented with auto generated filename in an editable field, and a save button User can edit the filename (or not) and ...


0

not sure what problem you're solving by this approach, why not use a standard file save behaviour. This is built in on a mac, download the file, name it, save it to an existing or new folder. Seems like this should be simple.



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