Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

In a completely different venue, I would like to suggest putting a support phone number in a prominent spot on the site (even if for a trial period of time), and allow users to call in or text with their questions. Be sure to mention that you can also text for those who prefer not to call. You may even want to get a separate phone line for that just in ...


1

My take: looking at the page I see video, text, weather, faq, trial flights, costs, competitions, learning, gallery, join, contact, learning, the club, search, advertisement, links to gliding pages, 10+ links to blog pages, upcoming events, support & fundraising. Reading another answer about cognitive overload, I agree, that it is a little ...


0

If you have a lot of users wanting to ask questions, it might be time to start an online forum. Other members of your community might be willing to answer those questions.


3

You could dynamically show related questions from the FAQ when the user types in the contact form (this assumes you have a contact form instead of telling the users to send an email directly). You probably need to implement some sort of fuzzy search or look for certain keywords for this to work effectively. Stack Exchange does a similar thing in the Ask ...


3

Extending part of @dan1111's answer, one other option is adding context to your contact page. One example of this is what Github does under some particular conditions. Take this page for example. If you scroll down to the very bottom and press the "Contact" link in the footer, it takes you to the contact page however with one minor change. Basically, ...


1

If you have a Contact Us page rather than just listing your email somewhere, you can specifically state on that page that most questions will be answered by the FAQ. Provide a link to the FAQ even if it's one of the top navigation tabs just to make it really easy for users to go there and find their own answers. If you're still getting too many emails ...


15

I was going to post some answer about the user being too hasty or inept at using websites but after looking at your website I would like to gently point out some observations: Home-page posts appear mashed together and it takes more cognitive load than I am willing to spend in order to understand it. It also looks like there is some important info in some ...


2

Building on @dan1111 's suggestion to "make the FAQ more prominent", consider implementing a task-centric help solution, which places on the screen help content relevant to what the user is doing. So your application could feature a prominent "help" button: When the "help" button is pressed, the page content gets squished to the left to make room for the ...


10

This is a very common problem. Many companies and other large organizations that offer a lot of support solve this by essentially requiring you to go through FAQ-like content before they even provide you with any way to contact them directly. Some take this to such lengths that it is very annoying for those of us who actually have a question not answered ...


1

Don't rely on the user; collect the information you want yourself. What you have presented here makes it clear that you know that the application crashed; you also know some state information about the conditions when the crash occurred (the open tabs). You should change your code to collect any other state information you are interested in. You surely ...


0

My thinking is that the back button should follow the same metaphor as the browser bar. Its the same rationale that apple follows for their IOS interfaces where the back button is above next to the title. This is because of context. Anything below the title is encounter specific (or page specific data) but a back button is outside of this context. Long ...


3

People don't like change because they fear loss of control over what they're used to know. We are creatures of habit but you always find the bold ones who will love and fight for the new feature, even within the existing user base. These are the ones - let's call them fans - who will help increasing the acceptance of the changed functionality. See the ...


0

Draggable interfaces can become awkward on touch devices. What about having a + or - symbol button on each list item, to include/exclude. When clicking the exclude it could highlight in Red and include could be Green. If the list is quite long you could have a summary list to one side, showing all the excluded and included items grouped together.


2

The positioning of the back button isn't very good in either of the screenshots. They go easily unregistered since they're out of place and very small, risk making the user frustrated since she won't know how to navigate properly. The third screenshot shows the back button ordered in the same group as Delete and New, buttons for manipulating the content. ...


1

I think the bottom left would be a fine place for it, without being too much work to change. It is better than the bottom center, because it would be the same on all screens. Also, adding the word "back" next to the arrow would help. I don't think it is highlighted enough without this.


1

I see two possible options: New In 0/157 styles Accessories 5/96 styles or New In 157 styles Accessories 96 styles (5 selected) I'd prefer the second one.


1

You can do reverse design for the selected menu. Make the background dark and change the texts in white. Hat background should be white and Hat need to be the same dark color as the background color. Hope it will help you.


0

If there aren't hundreds of items, I would make connected lists of draggable elements, categorized by Include and Exclude. All items could begin in the list that specifies their default functionality (included or excluded) and the user could move any or all items to the desired list. Here's a fiddle basically describing the concept: ...


1

Can have a variant too with the available JS frameworks and libraries, loading the content is taking negligible ms which helps us change the data in just a wink. With the above speed, we can also go for another variation where more data can be shown to the user without much navigation between the pages and also by using the minimal space available between ...


2

What happens when you select an item? If you are to just show the selected item, you can have a contrasting color in the background. Assuming it is a shopping site, you would want to provide action icons like "Mark as favorite", "Add to cart", etcetera. In this case, no additional styling for the selected item would be required.


2

Add a selection outline with the height of the slider like this: Since the item will never exceed the height of the slider, it should work.


2

Remember that "color blindness" is not the complete absence of color. That is called Achromatopsia and it is only seen in 1 in every 33,000 people. What humans typically suffer from is a deficiency in the development of the cones in the eyes, making it difficult to decipher differences in colors such as red and green, or blue and green. As mentioned above, ...


0

Here are some suggestions I leaned for designing a scheduling system based off of a gantt chart for a large client in St. Louis. Modes - possibly a drop down selector A everything mode because the user wants to see items in context with one another. If your icons do not fit then I suggest using a hover state for the smaller times. Modes that allow the ...


1

You can use hashing, for example :


1

Colors are not going to be a good way to distinguish 15-20 activities, period. There are too many, and colors will look similar. Besides the very good points made by Henrik Ekblom,: I would display the activity name or the first part of it whenever there is room. If there is a tooltip feature such as mouse-over (not clear if this is a desktop ...


3

One approach is to us a syntax highlighting tool that supports your grammars such as the extensible ace editor. This would guide the correct structure by flagging when BNF / CNF syntax is correct or not understood. Extending this approach you can add special symbols as buttons above editor box (just like the ux.stackexchange UI) auto-prompt for symbols ...


3

To start with it's a good idea not to solely rely upon colors (because of color blindness). Colors can maybe still be kept, if they in the gray scale will result in different gray shades - which can help the user to scan the area. Selecting Activity 1 could highlight all Activity 1 areas in the schedule. Add an abbreviation of what activity each block is. ...


0

You should pick the way that is intuitive to a new user of the system, so probably your unclunky version. Point out to compainers that this how standard software like M$ or Apple something does it too, show it to them. If there really are complainers afterwards, offer them to use either the old version or make it a setting to switch between the two. And I ...


1

You can try http://www.scifiinterfaces.com/ and the book Make It So which have critiques of TV and movie interfaces from diegetic and non-diegetic stand points (usefulness to the characters versus the viewers). I've also read good interviews and critiques with the people who make the interfaces over at http://www.inventinginteractive.com/


0

I design interfaces like this a lot. The tried and true practice has always been to copy ones you like, and then to start being original using your 'copy' as a basis. You are trying to speak in an established vocabulary of imaginary interfaces of the future, so while you want to be original and creative, you need to 'speak' the already established language. ...


2

I understand your concerns about introducing new functionality even if that will be a clear improvement. The benefits of the new functionality should far exceed the inconvenience of changing an old habit. In your case though I believe that the old habit will change quickly for the following two reasons : The right-click select it is today a standard ...


9

I think whether or not you should change this particular behaviour depends on two things: The severity of the impact on users The turnover of users If the current behaviour has a negative impact that is severe enough to cause mistakes, loss of data or wasted time, it is certainly worth making a change if it would solve those issues. It would force ...


0

you've answered your own question when you said the interface is clunky you must ask yourself which scenario, once learned is the better user experience and unquestionably that is your solution. UX is not just about learnability


0

Either way can be fine. With however one caveat: if there is not enough dead space in a typical document so you'd have to hunt for dead space then the original behavior is preferable. This is particularly true when the context menu is the only way to do certain needed actions (and as such is used often).


1

My thought is that the radio button list should show the selection (since that's what it's made for) and the visual cue that it's files being selected can be added.


1

(A) has the problem that the message is about saving, but the Cancel function cancels the navigation. (B) does not have the option to back out, so it does not support your scenario 2 ("...accidentally..."). (C) suggests an action which is rather improbable (assuming most people want their changes saved :-) If I only had these choices, I would add the ...


0

Users are not just the (for lack of a better term) end-user of the system. There are many other users involved: developers, business, as well as end-users. Talk to end-users about the existing product, discover their pain points, needs and goals. Use this information as your leverage. Prototyping can help quickly vet ideas outside of the dev cycle. Prove ...


0

If you can get access to people, I'd spend an afternoon chatting to users to understand what the system is suppose to do.


7

First, you are not causing any problems, you're doing the best you can with what you have and asking for help shows you have a good head on your shoulders. So I won't sugar coat any of my answers otherwise I don't believe I'd be doing you any justice. First, throw out the term agile. I've been in the environment you are in and they call it agile because ...


2

I think the industry has reached a point where UI/UX design needs to be done in a way that is both holistic and also systematic. By this I mean that companies looking to develop new products and services in the digital channel needs to invest time and effort in a design framework or a similar structure that allows you to combine the visual, content and ...


15

On Agile From the various Agile-related concepts, I'd like to highlight two: It meant to combat requirements volatility (frequently evolving or changing requirements or their priority). It increases time to market. Agile, when used in the right context (and followed by the word), is nothing short of magic. The cost of changes within a properly managed ...


0

Combine your lower chart with a top 10 lowest to highest, or vice versa, table to the right, and you're done! Seems to me the user does not need to see all data points, only the most significant ones. Sidenote: personally I find heat map and time difficult to combine in one chart. Cheers!


4

I like the grid option you generated, it is pretty clear to see the entire week at one time. For seeing the entire week, one other option you might consider is a piano chart or heatmap type chart. Piano charts are table-style charts that make it easy to see differences in data-density. They visualize the data using a scale of brightness, size, color, ...


2

I would make the options super simple for the user. I see 3 basic scenarios: Booking an entire day off Booking 1/2 a day off Booking a custom portion off (e.g. I'm leaving at 2pm on Friday) I also see these scenarios occurring by frequency in that order (full day, 1/2 day, custom) As a result I would actually present a UI that gives these 3 options up ...


1

I had this same dilemma at my office. We solved it by putting in a check box that had the label: "All day event" If a user checked this box, it would automatically grey out the times so they could not choose a time, and it would book that person off for the whole day. If the user is taking a week off for vacation, they would select "All day event" and select ...


0

Light grey and other light shades on white or another light color are purely evil for some of us. I simply can't read it. Ask some older folks to check your choices on a variety of monitors before feeling everyone should just love licorice-exlax ice cream just because you think it tastes great. It would be nice if people would try these combinations on a ...


0

If I were using the quote tool, I'd want it to work the way you're describing. The main focal point (correct me if I'm wrong) is the camera quantity. Let me choose the number of cameras, then show me a list of compatible DVRs.


7

I'm faced with that problem every day - both in creating new displays and updating old ones. From experience once you get past two colors you have a mess that is very hard to digest - UNLESS the colors are RARELY used. By rarely I mean that most screens do not have a color and only rarely are there more than 2 or 3 colored (whatever combination) rows on a ...


30

You are probably asking for colors to communicate too much information. Also, having five different background colors for the rows in your table will be too messy and hard to read. I would suggest something else, like: A star system from one to five stars. Different icons to represent different types of customers. I like the second option, because it ...


0

Regarding your size issue: Is there a size of your tabs in which 80-90% of the labels fit? If so I would suggest using that size as your default. And for bigger tabs you could make them grow according to content. That way you will have a good solution for most of your users and still be able to accomodate those select few that have bigger names for the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included