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0

What is the primary area of focus for users on your site? I'm going to take a guess and say Activities? If so, you might want to steal a concept from blogs dealing with categories & tags for linking information. Here's a typical example on the "our activities" page: If you click into an activity. You probably don't need to show list of all resources ...


0

Your UI only allows for repeating events by days. You need to add the ability to repeat within one day. Perhaps something like this: Default state: Repeat: ( ) Daily ( ) Weekly ( ) Monthly ( ) Yearly ----------------------------------- [ ] Multiple times during the day You can still choose to repeat the ...


4

I'd suggest you go with the empty item. For two reasons: To be consistent with your criteria options. Why should a user have to leave the date fields empty to get the complete range but have to select an option when it comes to types You usually refine your search by applying filters. Selecting "All" does not refine your search result whereas selecting a ...


3

(consider this more user feedback than UX professional feedback) The and and or filters are too complicated. Use and only. The user is smart enough to know that city and mountain and sea view will have few to no results. This simplifies the design (Look at View and Internet, my paint skills are limited): It works out very well with Internet since you can ...


0

My opinon is that the new button should be at the end of the list. This will also force your users to look through the list before adding, and maybe this is something you want them to do e.g. avoid duplicate links. Consider also adding a button that will take you at the end of the list.


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You need to think about the user flow here. What's being added? Is it common to add something, then, immediately after that you interact with it? Or is this just for the sake of adding new elements? Also, design wise, think about scalability. What happens when that list gets really REALLY long? Does the user have to scroll all the way to the bottom to add ...


0

Why not both? Have it consistently placed at the beginning of the list (top left). Add new items to the beginning of the list (slide the others along/down). This also keeps the newest items more visible (at the beginning of the list), and older items less visible (towards the end) - which may be preferable, depending on what your use case is.


0

Is this really a choice between just two options? I think there are more solutions than presented. Maybe it's better not to include the functionality for editing the list in the list itself. This way there is a clear distinction between content and functionality. One option would be to place to the button in the upper right corner. This is, for example, how ...


0

Here's the actual issue with this: If you don't put it at the top left, it'll always be in a different position, and thus be less easy to locate for a user. This is without even taking into account pagination. What are you going to do if there are 10 pages? Stick it on the last page? Stick it on every page?


0

If the latest item will appear on the top, then add the "add button" on the top left. If the latest item will appear at the bottom, then I would recommend adding the "add button" at the bottom. You guys might also want to consider adding a wide add button, that spans across 3 columns, at the top. That way it'll be quickly visible to the user.


0

Gmail uses the first option that you have provided for adding group of contacts to an email. This approach works well when it is not necessary to know what items go under what group. If that is not your case, you may try one of the following options. Option 1- Delete the group as a whole or delete individual items within the group. Option 2- When ...


0

Microsoft supports a number of resolutions for Windows Phone 8: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/jj206974(v=vs.105).aspx#BKMK_Supportedresolutions I advice you to take a similar approach as you would with Android. This because Android uses a much wider variety of resolutions than Apple. These variety of resolutions leads to a (more) ...


1

Elessar is a library that lets you have one number line with multiple ranges that cannot overlap.


2

The first issue is, which x does what? You have two "x" icons which may do the same thing, but perhaps not. If they do the same thing - why do you have two? If they don't do the same thing - you're using the same icon to do two different things! My concern is that a user may hit the "X" when they intended to hit the arrow, accidentally clearing their ...


0

Yes. I'd consider having a separate header bar for the X to close the window and / or moving the dropdown arrow closer to the labels Putting the default at the top of the list does carry the risk that the user might miss seeing that there are values above the default.


1

It's a well established recommendation for publications containing masses of continuous text to use hyphenation. Nope. It's a well established recommendation for publications on paper containing masses of continuous text to use hyphenation. Even on paper you will find a bunch of style guides that recommend against it. Remember that the one of the ...


4

A few suggestions I'd have for distraction-free, or user-friendly, text writing UIs: • Tall text field Longform text fields, like the one I'm using to reply to you, provide an inherent white space - so making this field sufficiently tall to feel spacious would be the first step. One helpful additional feature is an expandable text field, as this one on ...


0

An accordion as suggested by Boranas is your best bet. Another suggestion would be to add highly visible + and - buttons to the accordion headers to be touch friendly


1

The first problem is that you have only one link "add" for different kind of content. If you can it should be better to contextualize each link : "add a product" on your product list "add a link" on your link list "add an image" wherever you need to insert the picture Then when you ask him to choose a kind of product, he is already answering a question, ...


1

You can simplify it by transforming the tabs into a decision tree. Something like this accordion control : Then you can just pop up the right(single) window, instead of popping up a window with tabs.


2

"Last-Chance Dance Dialog" if you want to be cute or clever.


8

I believe the term you are looking for is "Confirmation Dialog" A simple google search on this term shows numerous examples of the paradigm you described. Confirmation Box Google Images "Chicken Box" by contrast shows delicious golden brown fried chicken Chicken Box Google Images


4

It's just a simple Dialog Box. Dialog boxes consist of a title bar (to identify the command, feature, or program where a dialog box came from), an optional main instruction (to explain the user's objective with the dialog box), various controls in the content area (to present options), and commit buttons (to indicate how the user wants to commit to the ...


0

Assuming the process is initiated by a user, then ideally: After 100 milliseconds, there should be some response from the system from the user's action. This response could be as simple as a spinning wheel or hourglass icon.* After 1 second, the system should either complete the action or indicate to the user how much time it will take to complete the ...


0

A way of communicating the progress of a user, whilst retaining the same basic look of the desktop app might be use a 'cropped' progress bar above the mobile interface (perhaps using images instead of dynamic controls) Here is an example of a cropped progress bar (I crudely replaced the "2" with a "2/9") The right hand side greyed-out connection tells ...


0

The need for speed Get a user to wait for a three minute coffee break is nice, but management doesn't like it. You need to make this as fast as you can (async maybe?) and play a little tune to the user while waiting. It's not OK to transform a document of 300 kb in 15 seconds - but if that is your absolute best, you need to entertain your user during the 15 ...


1

It sounds to me that, if possible, multi-threading may be a fourth and best-of-both-worlds option. You could monitor the progress of the export and update the UI using a separate thread, which should result in a significant boost in export performance. If this is not an option, is too difficult, or does not help for whatever reason, talking the users into ...


0

There is a book called "Dont Make Me Think" by Steve Krug. Now I havent read this book but I have heard great things about this book & that it is a must read. You can find the book on Amazon here You can refer this book for UX The other really good site which I recently came across is HackDesign which has some really cool lessons & I think will be ...


1

A solution would be to talk to your front-end designer/developer, or to give him some kind of documentation about the ids/classes that you used to bind the events to. I would make sure to replace elements selectors (#mydiv > p) with selectors that point directly to ids or classes (#paragraphInsideMyDiv) so that the templates could even be done from scratch ...


1

Just because the medium changes doesn't mean visual balance no longer applies. Because web apps are in a browser and browser sizes vary depending on the user, it is a bit different when comparing it to print media, where the designer knows explicitly the dimensions of the final product. Design is not an exact science, but setting appropriate css rules with ...


0

Having read all the answers, I still do not see the question answered! What are the usability studies confirming that users indeed find flat design better? I have read lots of complaints by users actually hating it. And I can understand why. Specifically, people complaining how they hate ios7 and the fact that Apple made it impossible for them to switch ...


4

When a user select a seat, she is having a device in front of her imagining the ride she is about to take. For the user the forward direction is in the line of sight and away in the distance. Thinking of going forward makes a vertical seat map more natural. The front of the vehicle need to point upward to make this analogy work. The horizontal ...


0

When I think of sitting "next to" someone, I think of horizontal rows. Having my seat mate either "under me" or "over me" doesn't mesh as well with my visualization of the real world. But that's just an opinion, not a measured observation. To be practical, execute a usability study.


0

I think either way is suitable as long as its clear which is the front and which is the rear. You started to allude to a good point though when you said "For me, vertical seatmaps are easier to read and easier to manipulate on smaller screens." Considering the context of where it is placed and who the audience is may reveal what is the best option.


1

Try both and see which one users respond to better. A/B testing is a good way to do that. As for my personal thought, I'd think vertical is better. Much like maps have North at the top, I would think of the vehicle front as the top. This is the way I've seen airlines do it, so perhaps it's just my past experience has trained me that way.


4

To expound on what @matt_d_rat wrote, There's a great write-up here about this, but it was originally designed by Norm Cox for the Xerox Star workstation in 1981! This icon is about as old as the concept of GUI itself! To see it in action check out this video and skip to around 21 minutes.


4

This looks like the time selector introduced in Android KitKat; From a UX perspective this UI works well on touch-enabled interfaces but would be a lot less intuitive if used with keyboard/mouse. There is a useful overview of mobile time picker UI's here - http://blog.iangclifton.com/2014/01/22/mobile-time-pickers/ And also a nicer looking ( to me ...


1

I admire the effort of mimicking an analog(ue) clock face, but I think you're oversimplifying things into complexity. The first point of hopefully constructive criticism is, in full honesty, one of my pet peeves as a non-native English speaker; the AM/PM thing. If your target audience contains a significant amount of non-natives, you might consider showing ...


0

1) Wireframes should NEVER be pixel perfect. 2) When designing apps for multiple screens, design with room for "play" so that small differences between screen sizes don't affect your design. So no - no pixel accurate positioning of elements unless your short-term goal is to reside in an asylum. 3) Pick 3 of the more common Android resolutions. Assume your ...


0

Two options Detect tap/touch/click outside the input box and search results (if you wanna avoid x button) Go with traditional x button But users might not know how to close if only option 1 is implemented, until they try.


2

From my comment above. One way of implementing this is to add a little gray 'x' symbol at the end of the input area, that when clicked will clear both the input area and the dropdown results. This system is fairly widespread so users are likely to understand it (for example, Windows Explorer's search box uses this). However, you can always add a caption ...


2

First off, wireframes are not high-fidelity screens, so striving pixel perfection should not be the main goal. Having said that, Android screens are dependant on size as well as density. Reading up on Google's screen support page should help clarify. Having developed for Android before, it's more important to create a basic layout, than to achieve total ...


0

Android have the following terms for each gesture: Source: http://developer.android.com/design/patterns/gestures.html I believe these are good terms as pinch can still be used as the overall term for the type of gesture, but then if you want specifics for which direction then open or close are good terms because they specifically refer to the opening or ...


1

I cannot give a comprehensive answer, but there is one very important case where the table is superior. Sometimes we have lots of equally structured items (that's an important precondition!) and need to display lots of information about an item in an UI which supports multiple tasks (or multiple scenarios of the same task), but only one piece is relevant ...


1

1) One important aspect is that a tile layout makes it easier to analyse the items one by one (a) while a table makes it easier to compare the items (b): a) The power of getting all the data around one content item in one separated layout item is not to be underestimated. The analogy between the two entities makes it a lot easier to focus on in and make a ...


0

A disclaimer first: I'm firmly in the camp of people that believes we should write labels, buttons, headings and other UI elements the same way we would write a sentence. This means "Sentence case", as opposed to "Title Case". Having said that, I'd write it like this: You must enter an agency name if an agency state has been selected. Please enter an ...


0

I think that the following resources might be useful for solving the problem: JavaScript Diff Algorithm by John Resig, creator of jQuery JavaScript library: http://ejohn.org/projects/javascript-diff-algorithm Slightly different version of the above implementation: https://github.com/ndarville/jsdiff While the above-mentioned resources certainly don't ...


0

This is something that I have attempted to do with developers, but I find that the best way to understand the changes to the UI is to have a good system for the development of applications, which means following a standards document like the Atlassian Development Guide or Google Material Design Guide. What I find is that if developers don't build ...


0

In the Bugzilla for Gnome Seeking phrases such as header bar and title in relation to Epiphany found a few items of interest. Primarily Bug 711408 - Difficult to see web site title with the new toolbar/header bar As a bug, it was high priority (seriously broken …) and critical. Raised on 2013-11-04, resolved by a fix on 2014-02-17. A few highlights: ...


0

The simplest way to do this that I can think of would be to pull (and compile, possibly) the two different commits into two different development environments then compare the parts of the interface effected by the commits. You could take this a step further and automate the process, interfacing with a commit history and triggering using batch files or ...



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