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0

Depending on how many feed there are to be chosen from, you could also insert the settings link below the feeds in a separated area (maybe your customer also wants to display terms of use or other "not important" information.) SELECT FEED - Feed 1 - Feed 2 - Feed 3 etc. - MORE - Settings Just a thought, maybe it helps.


0

For Android it's probably best to place a settings item within a 3-dot menu in the top right corner. However for iOS it's much more fair game. You could have a slide out right hand side menu with secondary links such as settings.


4

The Settings should be in the header. Look at the Google Material design structure as a reference. A 3-dot menu doesn't take up too much space.


1

This is a standard verification scenario, the most common example of which is domain verification. i.e. when setting up Google Analytics a user must paste a meta tag in the homepage on the site to prove they have access. The key is to require a verification or confirmation step on Site A, and to make sure it's obvious from the interaction design that the ...


0

If you have a relationship / association with the other site you can frame them allowing your users to never "leave" your site (although in practice they do). * If you don't have an association with them then there isn't anything else you can do but write compelling copy explaining the benefits to the user for leaving and coming back. You can add incentives ...


0

Why not use different coloured marker icons to show relationships between different markers on the map? E.g. all the green markers belong to the same group. Or even have custom marker shapes if the groups have a specific context.


0

I'm thinking about a super-complex situation - a dense, interwoven web of points. There might not be any neat way to both make the group visually distinct and not make the screen messy. If this is a desktop app, perhaps try to use very low-contrast lines to connect the points, and "light-up" the group (points and lines) on mouse-over. Consider this ...


0

See this picture, a great example how Humble Bundle solves your problem: You see the three main sliders: Developers, Charity and Humble Tip. You can see, how they find a solution for the "Charity" slider, which is divided into two others sliders which can be changed without moving the other sliders - subsliders.


0

As an alternative if you want to keep the original design the limitations can be fixed. Provide a min width so they are not squeezed too tight. Provide a data entry field by clicking on the amount popup to provide for finer amounts Finally when the number of channels grows show each channel in a vertical format as in Peters message.


3

Main problem with the sliders is that ordering is important: you cannot easily move €30 from Channel 2 to Channel 5. I see the following operations as relevant: increasing one channel's budget by decreasing the budget of one other channel increasing (decreasing) one channel's budget by proportionally taking (adding) bits from (to) other channels In ...


3

This original solution is attractive, but I agree with your assessment that it is not scalable. I would also argue that it is somewhat counter-intuitive because of its horizontal but proportional nature. For starters, I would change this interaction pattern to a set of linked fader controls. Something like what's found here for adjusting Bass & Treble: ...


1

Can't you remove the handles between the channels inside the slider and just use the signs above as handles? If it gets to tight, can you put every other below the channel? If all this fails and it's too messy - separate each channel into its own slider.


0

Best practice may not apply to a location There may be enough examples (Google Analytics and Podio are two more) that place toggles like this to the top and right of the content to say that it's a conventional location, but I'd argue that the location of controls like this should depend on the specific application and user goals. Examine your motivation ...


0

If you're wanting to just follow the norm then top right is pretty typical. I don't recall any specific black and white conventions for this specific thing, but it's typically a good idea to go along the lines of what other large products do. As Devin mentioned, Google Drive keep their grid/row toggle in the top right which is consistent with where Windows ...


0

I don't know of any best practice standard. There certainly seems to be a trend for top right, Google Drive makes use of this using a single toggle button.


0

I like (B), so have active conversations listed ontop of the stack, and then available contacts underneath. Similar to how Skype handles. As for placement, have you considered a panel that can expand and collapse, fixed within the navigation. Alternatively a fixed panel that can be 'popped out' via a button that will then transform it into a separate ...


0

Another alternative if you have a single page app is to have dedicated area for messaging This could be in minimized state when there is no messaging. Advantage of having this and your floating div is user doesn't have to switch windows or keep track of open windows. It is also lightweight as its in the same application context. The advantage of ...


2

I think this will not work well for the same reason that dynamic menus failed. The user uses location cues to select items quickly. The user may use the absolute location of the item, or relative to another item (e.g. LemonChiffon is below LawnGreen). Removing the item from the list when selected, will disrupt the formation of the above cues and it will ...


0

I see following reasons; Less details in flat design in contrast to glossy icons enables user to consume and memorize information easily. Easy to make flat design for professionals too ( less details) Major corp like google and microsoft adopted flat ui. Most of the people are now aware of computers and don't need skeuomorphism tricks.


0

Hiding the incompatible file types completely will cause confusion. Users will wonder if they picked the wrong folder and may spend a while looking for this missing file before they realise it can't be used. The best option would be to show all the files, but grey out the incompatible ones and make them 'unclickable'. Therefore it's immediately clear that ...


0

I think the way you have it now is great. Why clutter it by trying to do too much at once. I would suggest changing Quick to a more expressive saying though. Like Set time increments or something shorter. If you did want to get it all on one page you could just put Camera one and Camera two as two small tabs at the top and not give them all that screen real ...


0

It seems to me that changing the function of your interface at the click of a button would make for a confusing experience. The user has built a mental model of how it works, and expects the app to act a certain way, so it should consistently act that way. At least if you are operating on the "Principle of Least Astonishment": ...


1

Looking at Nielson's top 10 (despite being written in 1995), and based on some user testing, I actually think there's a case to be made for option 1. Consider the situation where a user believes the file they have prepared for the program is located at a place on the disk. The file is not of the required type, but most users don't always (often) read ...


5

Why does your boss need to compare the two forms? Think about what your user is doing, not what your user is saying. In other words, try to look for the deeper "story" your boss is telling you about how she wants to use the software, and try to provide that, even if it doesn't look like what she describes. Is it because the Annex is mostly identical to the ...


1

Option 2 is much closer to the mark than option 1, but having no "option to change [the] file type", especially when the user would normally expect to be given that option, is still wrong. Ideally, you should not be deciding whether the file in question is valid based on the filename extension, but rather by checking some type of tag at the beginning of the ...


2

In your case i would split up the whole input form in a wizard-like step by step input area. When looking at your layout it appears that you already started grouping the input fields with boxes. Consider that names of countries, persons and so on could be much longer than the input fields, so give them the space they need to properly display their entered ...


4

I have a personal rule that no single form should contain more than ~20 visible form fields because after that threshold the screen just becomes unusable. The solution to this problem will change depending on your client's actual needs. e.g. If there is a workflow where a user can create a contract (by itself first) I would have that as a simple form. ...


2

I would like to give you one explanation that comes from my field of activity. It has to do with the design of human-computer-interaction or better: human-automation-interaction. Very often tasks are too complicated to be fully automated. At certain points of the solution process the user has to be incorporated. Researchers found that a "mixed initiative ...


10

Alan Cooper makes the point IIRC specifically in The Inmates are Running the Asylum (coincidentally also using an ATM example) that a source of poor UX is that computers do not interact i.e. "converse" like real people. e.g. You: "Withdraw $200" Computer: "Insufficient funds" You: "Check balance" Computer: "$187.34" with a human You: "Withdraw $200" ...


1

Your immediate issue is a branding/PR problem. Your customers come in two flavors, but the ones you're looking to communicate with are "cloud admin" users (whether these are concurrently "system admin" users is irrelevant at the moment). First things, you need two discrete schemas to associate accounts with. The cloud admin needs to internalize these ...


1

Four things need to happen for users to migrate to cloud user management User needs to see and understand the overall system User must believe in benefits in cloud user management (notably this includes (a) belief that it is secure, and that (b) working off line won't be impacted Painless and clear migration path "Nudge" to both remind, educate and ...


0

Why we chose to do something similar was the result of internal studies. Something we try to keep in mind is that we (designers|programmers|analysts) are not representative of our audience. Not to be snobbish, we just remember that half of our users are "below average" and we have to keep systems accessible to all. We aim for about a 5th grade reading level, ...


1

I agree with the other answers, radio buttons are the best choice for an input with 3 choices. According to GNOME developer, they are preferable for your problem because: Radio buttons are used in groups to select from a mutually exclusive set of options. https://developer.gnome.org/hig/stable/radio-buttons.html.en Radio buttons or a list will ...


0

Errors cause frustration and confusion. Forcing a constraint to avoid an error is the better option. Forcing functions are a form of physical constraint: situations in which the actions are constrained so that failure at one stage prevents the next step from happening. In addition to preventing the user error, afford the user a clue about acceptable file ...


4

The answer is in the 10 Heuristics for User Interface Design by Norman Nielsen, which are a must read if you listen to me. Error prevention: «Even better than good error messages is a careful design which prevents a problem from occurring in the first place. Either eliminate error-prone conditions or check for them and present users with a confirmation ...


2

Instead of sticking to a 2-column layout, I would suggest going for a list based layout as shown in the mock-up below: In this layout, the Medicine name can be the title and the condition it treats can be shown as tags under the medicine name. Furthermore, if the user wishes to search all medicines for a particular condition, he can just click on the tag ...


1

I would suggest making it an accordion style interface. Keep the panels but have them expand horizontally (while shrinking the width of the others others) slightly when a user hovers over. Instead of the "flip" effect. You can add easing to the animation to make the motion feel more fluid. This would result in more horizontal space within each panel. I do ...


1

One option would be to give the user the ability to hide one or more of the lines, and the ability to display hidden lines again. Postscript: Based on what dayluloli stated: The lines are often close together and overlap. The legend should follow the end-of-line. Thus, the lines and legend should be presented in the graph. With the four lines in the ...


0

I'd prefer the navigation tabs approach, but if there are just two possible modes you could simplify it by just giving the option to select the mode in which you are not positioned.


6

A few different ideas come to mind. 1 - make the label color match the associated line color, so even if they overlap it's clear which label belongs to which line. 2 - Put each label in a containing div, possibly giving that containing div a border the same color as its associated line, with an opaque white background ... and possibly when a user ...


2

I generally favor radio buttons but -- as an option to experiment and test with -- you can use a slider. EXAMPLE: YES _ : : ▲ NO OPINION ▼ : : _ NO Be careful to factor in up/down and left/right prejudices/tendencies in your testing. Up tends to be "good" and down "bad". And left-right is inextricably ...


4

Generally, there are just two natural ways to set up a 1-out-of-many choice in HTML: a set of radio buttons, and a select element. The latter can be used with a size attribute specifying the number of options visible in the initial size, or with size defaulted to 1. For usabaility, it is best to have all options visible initially, so that the user can just ...


23

To select one option of a limited number of choices, Radio Button Inputs would be the way to go.


3

I think it depends a lot on whether this is a very common form or a rare form. If it is rare form, where the user might have little or no idea of what is valid input, I'd emphasize "explaining" a lot more. Since having the field just "beep" or "flash" on invalid entry will frustrate the user who doesn't know what they are doing anyway. If it is a common ...


3

Your second and third bullets (numeric only, maximum length) can be "preventing," because it's more or less clear from the context why the input box is not accepting the characters they are typing. Everything else is almost always "explaining." The ideal, of course, is to both prevent and explain. If your user is running up against a character limit, it's ...


3

Leave the value in there as an invalid state You should allow users to change the type and still keep what they wrote in value field. They might have clicked the wrong type, or want to copy what they had written. You need to communicate that the value is invalid though so I suggest you indicate this by making the value red: When the user leaves this ...


3

There are no absolutes in UI design, so it's impossible to say which is better in all cases. It depends on the data being input, the importance of it being correct, the difficulty in entering the data, the size of the form, the type of user, etc. That being said, Preventing invalid input is generally the best place to start, but you need a ...


1

To a certain degree, the system can handle the problem itself - if an integer is changed to a string, the number can be converted into a string automatically (in the image above to the string "123"). In this case no user intervention is required. If a conversion is not possible, there should be a warning message. You say, the user "can change data types ...



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