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1

JSON really just structures data in containers - {} or []. So the question really is what ways can you find of showing structures in a containers. I can't think of any more global container than a simple rectangle, and by using colours and some basic design elements, you can easily show a visual representation of the data. Here's a rough idea of what I ...


2

You're running into a common problem with displaying content when there isn't yet a lot of content. However, it's less of a problem being a corporate site as you don't have as much risk of losing your customer. If you approach the problem from a utility perspective, and ask yourself what will make the page / site more efficient for a user, I think you'll ...


1

Normally the folder navigation / selection and naming of a document are presented on the same screen. Something like this layout: The default file name is pre-populated in an editable text field that the user can edit if they wish, or leave as is.


1

According to your comments I think those two approaches would be good: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups About the by year / by date select (radio) I can't think of one being better in every sense (e.g: a dropdown with year/date is more clean but less explicit, all-in-all controls would minize the amount of ...


4

The reason for this is that you most likely are more familiar with left-to-right (LTR) languages, so your engrained progress is moving from the left to the right. People who are more familiar with right-to-left (RTL) languages such as Arabic or Hebrew, are likely to see a progression from the right to left as moving forward. You can see this in common ...


1

As a general rule, you should avoid presenting users with lots of fields at once (all on one screen). It is daunting for a user to be faced with this (unless they are a call centre data entry employee or similar). You need to break the form up into small, manageable tasks that are presented in a logical order. When you break up the form there will be less ...


0

Grey out the fields that do not require any input. Keeps the others in simple white color. For mandatory fields, you can put a small star besides the field The third point depends on the type of data, If some kind of big text is required you can open a separate textbox on clicking the field.


0

In complex situations like this, a little message console can be the perfect solution. Just put it somewhere really obvious (at the side / bottom / or perhaps near where the disabled button is located), and have it pop up to display details of any validation errors / issues that are blocking the user from continuing. The console box should only be displayed ...


0

The point of disabling a button is to indicate that action is required from the user to proceed but also to avoid displaying error messages. so explaining to user why a button is disabled defies the purpose. I would suggest to look at the journey carefully to make sure that the user is guided through in an optimal manner through both content and messaging ...


2

I would definitely avoid using that animated icon, as it is very strongly associated with "loading", and gives the impression that loading is incomplete. You want to show state as clearly "on", or "off". In the real world, people use buttons and switches to perform on or off operations, so it should be clear if you present them with some kind of labeled ...


4

I guess there is no clear answer if there are standardised easings. The type of easing is depending on what additional information you want to provide on current interaction in the current context. So for example: Interaction is removing a item off screen. When the item is of high importance, it has more "weight" and is "more sticky" to remove. When ...


1

Most wireframing / prototyping tools aren't platform specific. They're a blank canvas and you can use them for any platform. There's a significant group of mobile-specific tools which you can't use for desktop sites and apps, but beyond that I don't think there's any difference. An overview of some of the tools can be found here.


1

Visually, the tapering form of an arrow also justifies its use to indicate direction since the visual asymmetry interests and guides the viewer's gaze along itself. The biggest thing in common between arrows represented like this →, ▶, ➢, or much more abstract shapes is the taper. Why does the human eye naturally respond to this particular asymmetry/taper by ...


2

What are the reason arrows are interpreted as direction? Is this a cultural thing or is there something profoundly intuitive to it? I think it’s actually both so the answer is two fold: Arrow - Intuitiveness Intuitiveness is directly linked to affordance or rather perceived affordance. Norman thus defines an affordance as something of both ...


2

I think I would want to try and keep this on one page so that it's quick and easy to add lots of people in sequence. I would also want to have a single form for creating people of both types, bearing in mind many of the fields are shared. I would however want to keep the forms for creating and searching very separate to avoid confusion. Perhaps something ...


2

No. Most people aren't sure on this, because Neilsen's statement on the subject predates the wide-spread deployment and adoption of infinite scrolling: Yes, "return to top" can be avoided, because the exact same functionality is provided by simply dragging the scrollbar to the top of the page. It's almost always better to rely on a single, generic ...


1

I would advise you not to "port", but to migrate or rewrite. What I mean is the MFC desktop app's paradigm is different than a web app's. Your main goal should be giving the end-user a simple, usable app. Not a one-for-one replacement of your MFC controls. Take a look at modern web apps, such as: Windows 8 MyCompany demo applications [Microsoft Visual ...


5

This is just another example of the famous state-action ambiguity problem, which is discussed in length on this UX.SE question. The designer of the interface in question has chosen to show the state, rather than the action. Like you, I find it a bit awkward and unintuitive, but theory wise - there's nothing wrong with it, it can be either or, and neither ...


0

Checkboxes should be on the left, near their label. The further the checkbox is from its label, the more work the user has to do to visually align them. Even with alternate row styling, right aligning checkboxes can still lead to incorrect checkbox selection. In contrast, left aligned checkboxes are almost never selected in error. Sadly, cannot find a good ...


1

Remove all borders and rounded corners and keep each cell a single solid color. The best UI is no UI at all so make sure that everything you add absolutely has a reason for being there. Even simple things like borders and gradients can cause friction to the end user. I'm not sure the keyboard is even required to be there. Perhaps consider having a way ...


0

I would not mix accounts because of confusion leading to unintended consequences. What if Google let you log in as multiple gmail accounts at the same time? I don't know about you but I would feel like I was walking on egg shells the entire time worried about doing something intended for one account but accidentally spilling over to the other accounts. ...


0

I would base the decision on the actions John will be taking. Is he/she adding users to multiple campuses in one session? If he/she will be performing batch actions on, or viewing/using data from multiple campuses, then you might just want a campus selector on each tool/data. (Or, make it tags/filters if data is shared for multiple campuses...) If John ...


0

Your first diagram is good for visualizing the process and how the steps related. However you may run out of space if there are many steps involved. Your second diagram solves the space issue with the possibility of many steps, but you've lost the connection of how one step leads to the next. How about combining the two like this? download bmml ...


4

I'd like your opinion on the process I am trying to simplify, any and all suggestions welcome. I don't know — because I don't know what the customers are like, what the booking process is like, and what the pricing and business model is. Things I would be thinking about: Is it actually faster and more convenient? You are, for example, removing ...


4

This a common case in a complex workflow or process, which can be solved with progressive disclosure, like:- Initially show all parent tasks with their progress indicated and also childs status with notation like 2 off 5 childs is comleleted (indicated by showing 2/5). For more detail user can always expand a parent task to get sub-task details which in ...


0

One challenge with Title Case is that the rules aren't always clear. I found this site to Convert to Title Case, Sentence Case, etc.


0

It seems to me like the problem is related to confusion to available actions depending on the interface mode. How about we address that directly. Instead of using a button or drop down menu to implicitly imply its action, how about simply indicating the action directly on the buttons themselves? e.g. "Activate on Device" "Deactivate on Device" or "Update ...


4

In general, columns of numbers which are being examined as numbers should be decimal-point aligned (or right-aligned if the only decimal point is "implied"). Quantities which involve more than one radix point (e.g. currency amount in Britain prior to decimalization) should align each radix point, and right-align the columns between them; e.g. an itemized ...


2

Full disclosure, I prefer keyboard shortcuts to menus even though they aren't visible. I think all menus already obscure their content, so it's not just a case of knowing where 'file, edit, etc' are you already need to know what is inside them. If you know what is inside them then chances are you know where they are positioned on the screen. As such I ...


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When using right aligned numbers you must note that decimal separators are aligned only if there are equal amount digits after decimal separator: 12 345,90 132 987,9376 Aligning such numbers left would probably be even worse, so in cases where number of digits after decimal separator are not equal numbers should probably be aligned by decimal ...


1

In our system, numbers in our common calculators are shown in powers of ten. Let’s take a number ‘8634’. 8634 = 8x1000+ 6 x100 + 3 x10 + 4 x1 So starting from right to left, we have 0 power 10 then 1 power 10 then 2 powers 10 and so on. To keep it simple, this tradition makes readability easy from right to left.


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Digits are right aligned for similar reasons as you would right align them in a spreadsheet or a table. i.e. when you see multiple numbers (and they all have a fixed set of decimal places), then it's easier to compare the numbers with each other because the digits corresponding to each place value are in the same physical position, thus making it easier to ...


1

I think I grasped your question correctly: you want to redesign a web site, and the accompanying native app should look similar to it. You need a native app for certain features like push notifications. By going down the native route it would require you to override the GUI controls in whatever platform and redraw these controls to look how you designed ...


120

Screen digits are right aligned to maintain positional consistency between what a number represents (in base 10 that would be units, tens, hundreds, etc.). E.g. If I were to have 764 and then multiply it by 24, the answer would be 18336. By aligning to the right I've consistently seen the same unit representation in the same position, and when I've had new ...


10

I don't have any data about this question, neverthless here my thought: Readability is much better for right aligned numbers. Why? Consistency. The Decimal points always stays at the same location, decimal separators too. So it is much easier for a user to identify how big a number is. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


0

Advantage: It saves vertical space Ubuntu Unity was originally designed for Ubuntu Netbook Remix, a GNU/Linux distribution made for devices with 9" to 10" (220 to 250 mm) displays with roughly 1024x600 pixels. (Though netbooks stopped being manufactured roughly at the end of 2012, 10" tablets with detachable keyboards such as the ASUS Transformer Book have ...


0

You could use your web app design in your android and iOS app quite easily. It would also provide continuity to your users, who would be able to switch from one to the other with ease. Note that this image is quite dated. With the advent of HTML5 one can create even more impressive web apps. Source: ...


0

I strongly disagree with some of the posts I've seen here. The term HMI is heavily used today. HMI or Human Machine Interface is commonly reserved for defining a point of control for a Human to a machine driven process. This can range from a 1-button push button station, to a 4-buttons on and enclosure with a computerized HMI device such as a Panelview ...


0

I cannot comment, unfortunately, but I think that your situation would be helped tremendously with further analysis of typical use cases. More information is needed on the number of people involved, number of workstations, whether widgets are always processed sequentially, how many inputs and outputs there are for a particular procedure, etc. Try to ...


1

Simplicity. Both in terms of implementation and in telling the user what is expected. All users will understand what it means to enter the number with all digits and no dashes or spaces. Some small amount of customers will get confused if told that they can use dashes or spaces, and then they see their card only has spaces, no dashes. Keep in mind there ...


2

Why do web designers force users to enter credit card numbers without hyphens or spaces? Laziness. In general, super-strict form field format requirements rarely benefits the end user. It's typically implemented that way due to lax parsing on the back end/status quo/low priority. Which is unfortunate.


0

I have heard that some people make CGI scripts 'n' such to check up/validate input in information/data fields. Surely they can make a script that will accept spaces or hyphens in credit card numbers, then strip them out for the IT folks in the computer room. This makes it easier for the user to enter and double-check his entry before hitting "submit" or ...


4

There isn't really a "good" answer to your question, simply because they're engaged in bad practice. While that sounds negative, the simple answer is that they are not considering the User Experience properly: a flaw many designers and developers have, and one which I'm guilty of displaying myself on occasion. It may be that it takes too long, that they ...


3

Fixed names for variable circumstances is, in itself, fairly bad UX: if you can change that, I suggest you do. If it's not possible to change, however, I'd just name them after whatever goes through it: "Car" and "Pedestrian" - the user presumably knows what the app is for (opening gates) already, so just needs an identifier


3

I understand the question you are asking but think that it may be hard to give a generic one-size-fits-all answer. The UX workflow from company to company is so vast that what you ultimately decide to go with will require a lot of user research. On top of that, the workflow from product to product and even person to person is never the same (a real eye ...


0

You can look at the Activity Timeline pattern on Mailchimp UX. It is right at the bottom of the page. The example shows vertical alignment but for your case you can make it horizontal and just show the comments with additional details for the current running stage.


1

The Android example you provide shows 'spatial inconsistency' relative to the device edges, but spatial consistency relative to the content: the 'clear all notifications' icon is always in the same place relative to the list of notifications. The choice the UX designers made here was not between 'icon always in the same place' and 'icon always in a ...


0

I can't tell for sure, but it sounds like your dealing with one of the classic issues of Enterprise level software, growth. As your solution adds features, new screens are added and existing screens are augmented with additional data entry fields and buttons. Your navigation needs grow and so does the size of many of your entry screens. Eventually, your ...


0

No. My reason for saying this is simple: users do not like change. Users will know quickly that if they hover over an item on the nav bar, a dropdown menu will appear, because on so many sites before this, that is what happened. At the same time, this does not mean you should not add new things, and there is much room for improvement on the hover menu, and ...


1

For accessibility sake (WCAG standards): As opposed to what Google or SE does, you really should include underline in order to provide a visual way to distinguish links from non-links. Don't use colours to convey meaning. (1/4 people are colourblind) Some things you could consider are perhaps using clever typography and make each entry more human ...



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