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I think part of the reason we are seeing larger font sizes across the web is that web designers and users are placing more importance on the clarity of content. Sites like Medium or Smashing Magazine, for example, often publish articles with large swathes of content relating to their subject, and larger text is par for the course - it keeps things clean, but ...


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I don't think it's so much to do with the ageing population of the internet. In fact Over the past five years the number of people online, aged 65 and over, has remained relatively static — Ageing and the use of the internet I think the change that you're seeing is down to two things: 1) Changing display size and DPI. A 14px font isn't going to ...


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Well, assuming that all your employees get paid, sounds to me like in terms of UI it's just one simple table where the Salary field is editable. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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The primary differences are : The "Hamburger" icon gets displaced in the pushing-menu-to-the right instance. Incase of an overlay, the icon still remains at the same place. For some users, especially users who have not yet caught up to the functionality of a hamburger(even though it is existent since the 80's and was developed by Xerox), the experience of ...


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They are both indicating how you can get back to the other content (before you opened the menu). This is generally known as affordance. Since both methods leverage the user's ideas about how object should behave in the real world, they can be considered intuitive. I wouldn't say one is inherently better than the other, but if I was designing an application I ...


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Hi! So you have the slider which will increase/decrease only at fixed values. Now, suppose I want to set my duration for Break as 2 minutes. I set the slider at 2 and I click on the button "Duration for the Break is". As I know that the label for this action is always going to be in "minutes", it can act as a fixed label for me. I wouldn't need to ...


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Most of the people don't know what internet browser is ! so they end up using the default one(Internet Explorer) in case of windows. Windows dominate the computer market, so most of the users use internet explore. Most of the people don't care about internet browsers they just want to the work to be done


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I don't think you can say most users. It's highly contextual and depend entirely on the particular web site and the demographics of said site's visitors. In general, why you still see IE at all, however: many people browse the internet from work. Large corporations tend to still use IE for reasons including: Cost. People were still running XP up to this ...


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I like Alexey's idea, because the number and thing measured form a pair. So instead of showing controls for "50" and "repetitions" separately, the user instead edits "50 repetitions". My only concern is that links have a particular meaning and their use here is not standard. For example, I've been in situations where I had to wonder what the link would do, ...


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I think that there are two directions that you may follow to make this setting less cluttered: It seems like it's a good idea to treat settings like a meaningful phrases, but using desktop controls makes it unreadable. You may try to replace them by links (every user nowadays is familiar with links so it will not confuse). Doing this you will make your ...


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As far as I can tell, there is no good reason for it. The behavior was started by Microsoft (Windows) and sadly taken over in other user interfaces such as KDE. Here is some more e-mail conversation going on about the subject. Many people (including mysef) find it annoying for the simple reason that you look at the windows contents while dragging and ...


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I believe it’s a means of providing the ability to cancel a half-executed command. Imagine a user is 45% down a long page. The user attempts to perform a drag operation on the contents of the window (maybe to move an icon or select some text), but accidentally “catches” the scrollbar slider instead, resulting in scrolling page to X% down, and leaving the ...


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Android provides a widget which allows the user to select a number from a predefined range. The number picker's appearance depends on the current theme. For more information, see the NumberPicker reference in the Android Developer docs.


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A UI should always function in a way which is plausible to the mind of the user, based on their experience of manipulating objects in the real world. The scroll bar is locked to either vertical or horizontal movement. If you drag your mouse pointer too far in a direction where the scroll can't follow, then at some point it is illogical for the scroll to keep ...


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Will this document shown as PDF preview? or HTML page? If it is PDF Preview, then I think you don't have any control to modify Adobe components. If it is an HTML page then, I think you can have a pattern like page properties. In that you have bring on hide/show widget and provide the properties. If you don't have such flexibility, then try providing ...


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If you are considering this design for multiple device support then I will agree with Mart, you will have to avoid the hover event since touchscreens wont have direct support for that. Now that you have to provide the option I suggest that you can try the following Provide the option in the context menu on the page (right-click) provided you want to let go ...


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This article showed up the day before yesterday and I think it could be to your liking. Summary: The guys at Zeebox, a social network for TV, used a side menu with hamburger style menu in their new design around a year ago. People loved the new design, but user engagement was down. Time on site was almost halved. They changed it back and six months later ...


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As JonW said; i think you trying to ask if it's a good idea to put it in the upper left and I think not. There are ergonomic issues with placing things there (see picture below). A swipe from left to right could work however and is a common pattern (though you should still inform the user about the whereabouts of the navigation). Placing a commonly used ...


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I suppose that you don't have space around your document, or don't want to use some. Then your only solution is to display the action button on the document. You chose to show an icon on mouse hover, probably in order not to cover the document unnecessarily. This is fine but be careful as tablet touch screens don't have hover events. Another solution is to ...


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Is it absolutely necessary? No. However, does it make sense? I think so. As you said, you are providing "the ability to open the game's Main Menu." A main menu takes the user out of the current context. If it was a "map menu" or an "actions menu" then I think you could more easily restrain the context to that of only what is capable at that time. However, ...


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Within the context of the map and the users' behaviors within the map navigation, providing a link to manage combat abilities seems irrelevant from a UX perspective. Almost a distraction. I would suggest keeping the interaction focused on what the user is most likely there to accomplish in that space. Perhaps, allowing a user to launch into combat mode from ...


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I am wary of any solution where the user has to remember that inputting x really means y. If the "infinite" or "unlimited" state can't be unambiguously represented by the spinner control I would consider using another one specifically for the "unlimited mapping" use case. Perhaps have another checkbox for unlimited that, when selected, disables / greys out ...


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For now I have decided to design a Journey based solution for this task. I will be using numbered steps, with a "Step 1 of 9" as the first page focus, accompanied by a flat design progress bar to quickly show the progress along the journey. Each step will be able to use swipes to navigate between the steps, with a button included to jump to top-level ...


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If the user is the account, then the account can be the top-level environment. In this case, you would get: Form the user's perspective, the UI includes everything he/she can do when logged in. If the user has multiple accounts, the UI can stay the same:


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As I understand it layout is more important to comprehension than UI markers. In the Code Complete book by Steve McConnell there is empirical research as to what code block formats are robustly understandable, and which cause issues. In short, as I remember it, nested blocks should be indented, and a block should be left aligned. Now if you have issues ...


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To improve your UI/UX and would strongly suggest you to put a legend somewhere near, so it is clear for your users and then it will not be so important how exactly you show start/finish of a block as long as you notify your users about the meaning of colors/blocks in your interface. That would solve the essence of your problem and the question how to show it ...


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Going to prefix this with i am a developer first and budding UX person second so some of the terminology may be off here. Putting this in an answer as it may be long, but any little helps i guess and may open up a debate. Maybe we are complicating the user model with the user flow. The current system model is the true system setup because everything is ...


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It all depends on context. But, in general, if you need a tooltip to explain something, I'd argue that shouldn't be in a tooltip to begin with and should just be a part of the content on the screen by default.


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I would design the interaction such that each task includes an optional survey that is considered part of the task. That way, randomization will not break the link between task and survey, because they are considered one unit and will always travel together.


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Out of a related discussion which started on Quora, Geoff Alday dug a little deeper into the origins of the icon itself and discovered that Norm Cox is the man credited with designing the icon for the Xerox Star personal workstation, which was introduced in 1981. In an e-mail conversation between Cox and Alday, Cox reveals how the icon came about and the ...


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I think sliders are bad practice in general when it comes to selecting a precise number. A slider is a good choice when you know that users think of the value as a relative quantity, not a numeric value. For example, users think about setting their audio volume to low or medium—not about setting the value to 2 or 5. — Microsoft Sliders are functional ...


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I think first you have to understand the purpose of skeuomorphism and use it for the right reasons. Don't use it because you want to trick the user into thinking it's "real" and don't use it solely for aesthetic reasons. What is the purpose of skeuomorphic design? To convey functionality. Skeuomorphic Design Should Convey Functionality


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You have two questions: 1. What kind of design do users like the most at the time of this question, 'Flat' or 'Skeuomorphic'? 2. So my question is, 'should I change it, or keep it the same' To answer Immediate answer is Flat (with caveat). Flat design is in a clear trend. The aesthetic and visual language/vibe of 'flat' is something that most people ...


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I completely disagree with the notion that Skeuomorphic was to compensate for low resolution. Historically, we can see that Flat design was in use in the early 1990's for computers, i.e. CGA and EGA level monitors, due to their limited resolution and colors. As resolution improved, there was a desire to try to make graphics more realistic, because the ...


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I think that context is very important to answer this question. In a complex site that might be graphics heavy, flat design might not compete. The age group also makes a difference as well. But which ever way you think is best, I don't think mixing them is advisable. In my experience, mixing them has lead to the flat designs being unable to compete for ...


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I have taken some of the flat designs that designers adored and done some user tests with them. First of all, users found them plain and generic. More troubling was that users found them confusing. Without drop shadows, gradients, and textures, they thought that the page hadn't fully loaded or that it was buggy. I watched, stunned, as they sat and waited ...


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It's important that it is somewhere relatively easy to see and I think you have to think of what a user is looking for - flags can be very 90's but they work because they act as a good signifier, so I wouldn't discount them if designed correctly. I also agree with Franchesa RE that Dutch site. The Seek website has a variation on the idea - although it's ...


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To answer your other question "Where did this come from?": the real-life item we mimic with this is your standard index card clipped to a note. The Gestalt law applies in real life because we have depth perception that alerts us that the index card is not part of the note below. With the emerging standard of flat OS, this becomes a more valid question. ...


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With this feature, if a user leaves the title field and then clicks on it again to continue typing, they don't have to type "space" first before adding another word.


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If the choice is only ever between native language and english, and you want to maintain a professional look, you can't go too wrong imitating how this banking website does it. It's clean, flagless, and easy to find. The top right hand corner seems to be pretty standard position for language toggles.


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I agree this is a tricky one, there's no easy way around it. One of the more popular comment services these days is Disqus - their comments are responsive. It's not perfect, really only handles up to about four levels of indentation. Example. The other option, if you think you are going to get more and more levels of replies like this would be to just ...


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Actually the accepted answer does not show one main reason why it has been made this way. More than visual perception, putting a fixed bar at the bottom of a modal popup which has actions (like "OK" button in your examples) will let the user see the possible actions even if the content section is too big to fit in a small screen -->There is a scrollbar. ...


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Not everything is UX/UI design, sometimes it's technical/legacy choice. Your navigation with left click and your right click are 2 different things. The right menu is populate with all available options from a the object under the mouse. This list of actions contains browser actions, browser extension actions, system actions, antivirus actions... this list ...


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I think the two steps is definitely confusing. Making it a list of search terms that you can add via dialog would simplify it for me: Most users will understand that these terms are and'ed together. Handling combinations of and/or can greatly increase the complexity: "brunette man or redhead/blonde female." Then you really have to weigh the benefits of ...


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I think using words like "and" and "or" will be best to ensure your users understand what they are doing. In this example the user would set the first attribute and then they can choose "And" or "Or" for the second attribute to determine if it is a union or an intersection. This can be done for both included and excluded items. You could select "and/or" ...


0

Specific answers, with assumption that you have reasonably savvy users Consider supporting drag & drop to reorder items rather than arrows. The important data entry states (in this case the check-boxes for "Visible, Cleansing, DeDup") should always be shown. An option is to only show the manipulation controls (in this case "delete; add below; move ...


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Am not sure about "add stop" is required or not? I think it is unnecessary option and I would suggest you to remove. User interface is good however you could replace expected fare into taxi fare calculator for particular source to destination. You may find some additional features at Taxi Mobility, where they providing advanced features of cab tracking and ...


0

Interesting question - I have right-clicked a link thousands of times and yet I'm not sure I have ever registered the first option is simply "Open". Regardless of the "logic" for including it, I would have thought the real question is: do people actually use it? Personally I have never once selected that option. Even when I right-click and then decide I ...


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A link is an element of certain documents, but not only web pages. The system has a record of applications and actions associated with elements, like open, copy, move, share, extract, etc. The associated action depends on the element and the applications that are registered as capable to interact with it. A link, which may appear on many applications, has ...


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I guess it is just related to the fact that a person might want to see all options he or she might have concerning that specific link. Although useless at first, if the person has opened the options list clicking with the right mouse button, the option that this person finds to be the chosen one might be open link after all.



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