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58

Selected – Create an inverted selection state which would make this feature more prominent. Many ways to accomplish but as an example; Make the button background black with a white or light grey pencil icon. Enabled – Increasing the contrast. Our eyes become less sensitive to light and see a narrower section of the colour spectrum as we age. Increasing the ...


57

A couple of other options: An X that is styled differently. X is an easily-recognized symbol for both actions. I think any confusion mainly arises from the fact that you are using the same style for both, creating the expectation that both will perform the same action in your interface. If you had, for example, a red X with slightly different ...


46

contrast Your icons are lacking discernible contrast--both between the icon and the background, as well as between the active icons and inactive icons. Increase the contrast.


38

A save button should always save everything. Accidental data loss is about the worst thing that can happen to users. This is why many applications (e.g., GMail) don't even have save buttons; they just auto-save everything. If technically feasible, auto-saving is an even better solution (as long as there is an effective undo). Note: when auto-saving, it is ...


34

Simply because it requires less mental work :-) You are referring to a paradigm called WIMP, which was developed at Xerox PARC back in the 1970s. WIMP (Windows, Icons, Menus, Pointing devices) experimented with a "digital version" of real-life elements, represented by icons. This was very intuitive.


33

If you are looking for the most easily recognizable use of a 5-star system, they should work from left-to-right. The star-rating system is very common now, and when is the last time you say it work right-to-left? Users will likely find it confusing and will have difficultly understanding why they only gave something 2-stars, when the meant to give it ...


31

It is difficult to find supportive evidence for this question. From what I've read about Philip Olsson's pictograms (some starting points are here and here), I would say that it, like the other media control symbols, represents movement, and in the case of Eject, the movement is upward, out of the horizontal flow of the media timeline. The bottom rectangle ...


30

You are probably asking for colors to communicate too much information. Also, having five different background colors for the rows in your table will be too messy and hard to read. I would suggest something else, like: A star system from one to five stars. Different icons to represent different types of customers. I like the second option, because it ...


29

In the team I am on, our idea on the matter is as follows: Continue is used when you're talking about a directed flow forward only. Continue implies that anything you've done hitherto will be saved, so that you can move forward in the workflow. Ideally in a Continue-based setup, there will be alternate ways to return to previous app states, if your design ...


29

Arrows have been an indicator of direction for so long that it's hard to say for sure, but my guess would be that an arrow fired from a bow only has one direction it can go, lending ease of communication when direction is needed. And since bow & arrows have been around long enough, and in practically every culture it has basically become universal. ...


28

Imagine this for a second. The UX logo for this site disappears on the home page, but then appears again when you're on any other page other than the homepage. It wouldn't be a good experience. So, keep it, people are accustomed to the "home" button being there constantly. Especially if your homepage has dynamically generated content, because people use ...


25

Is the arrow symbol truly universal? The United States launched two spacecraft in 1972 and 1973 with a message for any alien species that might encounter them. The message was specifically designed to be universally interpretable. It built up it's own number system from scratch using the fundamental properties of the Hydrogen atom. The goal was to ...


24

There are many factors contributing to this. Enterprise apps are evaluated by their functional features, not by their UI. When the UI does come into play, it's evaluated by its efficiency, not by its look and feel. By "efficiency" I mean comparisons like "with our software your employees will complete the task in 10 minutes, and with the competing software ...


24

Just to offer an alternative hypothesis, the fact that the basic shape is two lines converging on a single point, might have something to do with perspective: In this case the sense of direction is created by our very own direction. There may not have been very many highways in paleolithic Africa, but the plains may well have had some similar features. At ...


23

Seamless has a nice implementation of this actually: Here, the user can slide each option either way, or just leave it and continue scrolling if the condition was not discussed. Adapted from the elegant and modern design of @tim.baker (I would just add in the "x"s and "check"s, to help with clarity and in case of a person who is colorblind). This also ...


23

Which relationship do you want to emphasize? Use that to inform your decision. The down arrow in your image indicates a relationship of "is title of" or "is detailed by" or even "has child", whereas the up arrow indicates a relationship of "is detail of" or "has title" or even "has parent". I suspect the down arrow is more common and thus familiar to more ...


23

To select one option of a limited number of choices, Radio Button Inputs would be the way to go.


22

I hate to be a stickler for tradition but I think, in this case, it sounds like management's taste in UI has over-taken the user experience. In UX terms there is nothing wrong with what you had, in fact it sounds lie it may have been better - given that everybody understood it. Colours also might help with your contrast ratios. It might be worth ...


20

No, skeuomorphism, as a UI tool, is used as much today as it always has been. What has changed are visual design trends. Though related to skeuomorphism, it isn't the same thing. The term skeuomorph isn't a well defined term. I'm going to borrow the image from Trevor's deleted answer (which, BTW, I think is a very valid answer) Where I usually find ...


20

Adding to Will's answer, if you're looking for a non directional highlight, here is a great example from Google's material Design Material design guidelines on using Tabs The tab corresponding to the visible content is highlighted. Tabs are grouped together and the group of tabs are in turn connected with their content. Keeping tabs adjacent ...


20

If you're looking for something that symbolises the word 'remove' then why not just use the word 'remove'? It's not especially large a word. And you have plenty of space in that UI to fit it in there. Plus it removes any ambiguity as to what it means.


18

Why not replicate the way the users are used to deal with this on a form? That's what you're basicaly already doing in your second mockup. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The way to change from the one into the other would be clicking on it, and cycling through the three states.


18

The interfaces may look very similar to you, but they are constantly evolving, and have been refined for many years. Firefox in particular is very open about their UX process, and how they rely on user telemetry to understand how people use their browser. They don't simply copy features. They try to understand their users. In the early days, browsers could ...


17

As often, we need to read the first section of the Wikipedia article. In computing, graphical user interface (GUI, sometimes pronounced "gooey", but more often as "gwee") is a type of user interface that allows users to interact with electronic devices through graphical icons and visual indicators such as secondary notation, as opposed to text-based ...


17

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


16

The UI element you are referring to is called the List Builder Reference: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dn742407.aspx#usage List builders allow users to create a list of choices by adding one item at a time, and optionally setting the list order. A list builder consists of two single-selection lists: the list on the left ...


16

It might be a good idea to provide the percentage as additional information if applicable, and display the absolute changes instead, e.g. +9 (900%) but then leave it out if not applicable +10 This way a user recognises that there was a change and also gets an impression on how much has changed relative to the previous number.


16

On Agile From the various Agile-related concepts, I'd like to highlight two: It meant to combat requirements volatility (frequently evolving or changing requirements or their priority). It increases time to market. Agile, when used in the right context (and followed by the word), is nothing short of magic. The cost of changes within a properly managed ...


16

I was going to post some answer about the user being too hasty or inept at using websites but after looking at your website I would like to gently point out some observations: Home-page posts appear mashed together and it takes more cognitive load than I am willing to spend in order to understand it. It also looks like there is some important info in some ...


15

Designers have to do what is best for the user First, why are you designing something? Users will not use products they don't like. If they are saddled with using them (e.g. their employer determines what they have to use at work), they will hate using products they don't like. If you don't care if anybody ever uses your design, then you are not bound by ...



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