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13

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


9

The "OS X Human Interface Guidelines" on drag-and-drop can be found here: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/userexperience/conceptual/applehiguidelines/TechnologyGuidelines/TechnologyGuidelines.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30000355-SW9 The guidelines go into quite a lot of details, but you will want to highlight areas that the file can be ...


6

When you can, be redundant in your feedback. In this case you have 2 significant elements, the dropped item and the drop receiver, and both of those can provide feedback, get lighted up or tuned down. If drop isn't available make both the cursor indicate that and the (would be) drop receiver indicate that. The cursor can indicate that by become a circle ...


6

If the user is very likely to want see the more-info details you could find it worthwhile to go to a fixed master-child UI layout, similar to illustrated. This provides affordance and fixed positioning for data. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note details area could be positioned at right hand side of ...


3

Don't move my cheese I think this is a classic problem where the developers who've created these tools haven't been able to anticipate how their applications are going to be used. When you can anticipate everything, you're able to design a great UX on the first try. But that just isn't happening here. And then as features are added, they don't bother ...


2

how about a border around the box with diagonal stripes. diagonal stripes, similar to construction tape will suggest to the user that this area is not usable at the moment.


2

For me it depends on the needs. There are generally two scenarios.. I want user to continue on another article. I want user to take reference from another article. If its 1st then he is done with current page and so the link should be opening in same tab. If its 2nd then he should be coming back to the current article after taking reference so, the link ...


2

I would refer to this article on CSS Tricks. It list both good and bad instances to open links in a new window (i.e. use target="_blank") Bad reasons Because you like it that way Because you don't want users to ever leave your page To differentiate between "internal" and "external" links Because it links to a PDF Because a client wants it that way Because ...


2

Rather than using a popup, which can get problematic on small devices, I'd suggest to display the additional information below and inside the affected row. The example in the image shows what I'm trying to describe. It usually a grid with various album names. The song names of the album appear when you click the link (in the example it's clicking on Sleep Is ...


2

Here's another approach: I work in e-commerce and one possible solution to your additional info in a grid problem could be solved with how we display more info about our product on the product listing page. If you think of a product grid as a cell in your spreadsheet. In order to see more info about a product (in this case your cell), a pane could slide ...


2

Being a developer in PHP, Android, C# and working professionally with SharePoint I can only applaud this question. In many developing languages and IDEs it sometimes looks like someone came up with an idea and it was implemented as a button, a menu item or a keyboard shortcut. Without thinking of that this feature will actually be used by someone. Sometimes ...


2

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


1

One of the first things to do when attempting to design a UI is to determine what information you need to display to the user, and I know this sounds like a no-brainer, but it's actually a very important step. Once you have a list of this (for you something like "stocks, return, time period, etc.") you can begin to see how the different data sets or ...


1

The Unavailable mouse pointer is always an option that's understood my millions of Windows users:


1

This complex interface has two layers, both of which are complex in themselves. A primary and secondary layer if you like. Using a popup is a good start but there are several ways you can make this easier to use: Highlight the cell that they are operating on and consider using that as the trigger to open the popup, or highlight and the enter key, meaning ...


1

Could the answer be that (like number 4) things are now on tables? Computer screens sat on tables and walls in front of you and you looked "out of/through" them. Think of the XP fields. The metaphor was one of a window, and postive light, and the light fell (in the wrong direction) on drop-shadow buttons. You were looking out and depth was important and ...


1

This question is similar to something I recently implemented which has had success. Because I am unaware of the time required to process the request your users are clicking - I will try to give a few broad options. I will try to give answers that do not require building a dashboard or a completely new UI. Cost can drive up quickly doing so. The link ...


1

Some ideas: After clicking the link, disable it so it can't be clicked again. Enable it again when it makes sense for it to be clicked again (if the process completes or fails). Display an indicator near the link to show that the process is in progress. This could be a simple spinner or throbber, a loading bar, a "please wait" message, etc. When the ...


1

Ideas for you: User clicks on a link and a mini "request sent" status gets displayed next to the link If user stays on the page/page gets refreshed, the status next to the link updates to show the current status If user performs a lot of these long process time actions, consider putting together a dashboard where they can review status of all processes in ...


1

Two simple suggestions for you: Display some form of loading image at the side of the button, indicating that there is some processing going on. This will ensure that the user does not click on the button multiple times for fear that the button is not working. Once done, you can easily hide this loading image. Change the text of the button to 'loading...' ...



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