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8

In English it is standard practice to capitalize each word in a heading. It looks "wrong" to native English readers. However this is not necessarily the case in other languages. If your target audience are English speakers then the answer is a clear-cut yes. Capitalize Each Word. (There are exceptions but this works as a general rule.) Here is what to ...


5

Top right Most users will perceive the image and related text as a whole, then process it starting at the top left then moving downwards and across if necessary. For image+text (English/left-to-right languages) combinations, the visual flow looks like this from eye-tracking studies: Here's what that flow looks like for a Facebook image+text feed: ...


5

User experience is different from usability Although this might be obvious, it provides a useful distinction for understanding how to design delightful user experience. One well-reasoned framework used by Aaron Walter (author of Designing for Emotions) is the hierarchy of user needs which is based on the similar logic to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs: The ...


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My short answer is no. Grey does not always represent disabled condition. I think it depends on the usage, context and the colour scheme of your app. Lets take email sign up popups as a first example. You land on some news website and immediately after the page loads you are presented with a popup with couple of inputs and usually two buttons, Cancel and ...


3

Function before form. People will use garbage -- and often do -- if the application is good. The better the application, the more likely I am to use it, and to continue using it. Form only comes into question when it stops people from utilizing the application or when there are multiple competitors on the market with the same function(s). Your example of ...


3

I dont see an issue with the naming. We had a similar issue in one of our applications, the solution was to display a column after the sorting with the number of days remaining along with the actual due date. Due in X Days. Although, I believe these labels are more common: Due date soonest first Due date latest first


2

Two suggestions to try, 1) change the wording "new" to the wording you use in your question. E.g "write on ease", or "write an article". 2) try some highlighting techniques, maybe a subtle bit of animation, transition or some other such "look at me" technique (colour, size, position). You could make this personal, even if they are anonymous. E.g only ...


2

First of all I would suggest you to ask yourself "Do I want my user to delete a photo that easily?" Actions that cause some sort of loss should not be made that easy to reach. They should be intuitive but not easy. Deleting a photo is one of them. Also I would want my user to keep photos for as long as possible to build a sound profile. Maybe someone at ...


2

The UI is right now consistent and improper. Considering user's mind, he will have to run on the screen to perform various actions. The best option to be applied here is your first point. i.e. Hamburger icon on left side. So that the user can have access to all the options in one go. e.g. You will put everything under hamburger icon but for Home button the ...


2

Grey is a convention, not a rule It helps to understand why grey is used for disabled buttons: Grey is a neutral color so it's good for communicating subtle or de-emphasized elements. Disabled buttons (because they are not clickable) are usually communicated to the user via de-emphasis. The visual message is: "I am a button (look at my shape) but I ...


2

Since question is stated in a way it can be answerd vaguely best answer would be that it depends on combination of any number of factors. However, if we take Dieter Rams' 10 principles for good design and apply them to application design we can outline list of major factors that impact applications user engagement: 1. Is innovative App should be following ...


2

You are on the right path! The so called hedonic qualities are the WOW-factors of your application. But, there are also some costs of use, which is usability. Usability has to be good, otherwise users avoid your app. This is the baseline (or must-have). Nobody would buy your app, because it is usable. People expect it! If your must-have is good, you can put ...


1

You might want to have a look at a related UXSE question. It is okay to use grey for non disabled things, provided there is no conflict on page. Currently your grey color is overloaded by two meanings. On buttons it acts as a disabled state, on icon is not the case. This reduces affordance and users would definitely frown upon it. The top answers in the ...


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Top right. Since most people are right handed (roughly up to 90 percent of people are right-handed) and using Fitts's law formulas it is the best option. Scott http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handedness http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitts%27s_law


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Interesting question. I make the same observations on the bus & train too, so I would like to add some observations: People change how they hold the device even when in the same app, this is based on a few things like do they have both hands available (holding on to a rail / startbucks coffe / bag) the amount of people around them (some block the ...


1

It depends on if you intend of the user reading carefully every notification. If that is a priority, then you could use fade-in/fade-out notifications that stack along the side of the screen: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This could include close buttons on each notification (the button could be displayed on ...



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