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30

You are probably asking for colors to communicate too much information. Also, having five different background colors for the rows in your table will be too messy and hard to read. I would suggest something else, like: A star system from one to five stars. Different icons to represent different types of customers. I like the second option, because it ...


23

Which relationship do you want to emphasize? Use that to inform your decision. The down arrow in your image indicates a relationship of "is title of" or "is detailed by" or even "has child", whereas the up arrow indicates a relationship of "is detail of" or "has title" or even "has parent". I suspect the down arrow is more common and thus familiar to more ...


20

Adding to Will's answer, if you're looking for a non directional highlight, here is a great example from Google's material Design Material design guidelines on using Tabs The tab corresponding to the visible content is highlighted. Tabs are grouped together and the group of tabs are in turn connected with their content. Keeping tabs adjacent ...


15

On Agile From the various Agile-related concepts, I'd like to highlight two: It meant to combat requirements volatility (frequently evolving or changing requirements or their priority). It increases time to market. Agile, when used in the right context (and followed by the word), is nothing short of magic. The cost of changes within a properly managed ...


13

I was going to post some answer about the user being too hasty or inept at using websites but after looking at your website I would like to gently point out some observations: Home-page posts appear mashed together and it takes more cognitive load than I am willing to spend in order to understand it. It also looks like there is some important info in some ...


12

My recommendation would be for option A as you are providing a visual indicator from the tab text to the content below stating that this is the highlighted tab and the related content for it is below as shown in the screenshot below This will hold good even if you move on to the other tabs as the users will scan the content from left to right and with the ...


11

They both look wrong and unecessary. For a tabbed interface the colour of the tab should be the colour of the selected page.


10

This is a very common problem. Many companies and other large organizations that offer a lot of support solve this by essentially requiring you to go through FAQ-like content before they even provide you with any way to contact them directly. Some take this to such lengths that it is very annoying for those of us who actually have a question not answered ...


9

I think whether or not you should change this particular behaviour depends on two things: The severity of the impact on users The turnover of users If the current behaviour has a negative impact that is severe enough to cause mistakes, loss of data or wasted time, it is certainly worth making a change if it would solve those issues. It would force ...


7

I'm faced with that problem every day - both in creating new displays and updating old ones. From experience once you get past two colors you have a mess that is very hard to digest - UNLESS the colors are RARELY used. By rarely I mean that most screens do not have a color and only rarely are there more than 2 or 3 colored (whatever combination) rows on a ...


7

If you are going to use a skeuomorph you should avoid unnecessary and baroque decoration Here's some originals from my current desktop (the wooden one) to help us understand what it is we are trying to represent to the user: Arrows don't add anything to this visual metaphor, they only serve to distract and confuse. As an example of this deleterious ...


7

The short answer Simply use labels. The long answer If you are to design anything based on future possibilities, you will never finish a design, because possibilities are endless. There are basically 3 design approaches (UX or software): Throwaway (revolutionary) When you have little understanding of the problem (high level of uncertainty) You design ...


7

First, you are not causing any problems, you're doing the best you can with what you have and asking for help shows you have a good head on your shoulders. So I won't sugar coat any of my answers otherwise I don't believe I'd be doing you any justice. First, throw out the term agile. I've been in the environment you are in and they call it agile because ...


6

Interface design, historically, was based on physical things from the real world in order to increase familiarity for the user, and hence trivially communicate how the interface should be expected to work through analogy. This is why we call things like "folder", "desktop", etc, by those names. In a tabbed interface, the analogy is to a folder with tabs, ...


5

Option B is breaking the horizontal line between tabs and content. #it just feels unpleasant. Option A is a complete menu plus an arrow dictating the flow direction telling you to read the content, feels good. Maybe try another option C without arrows, but A is good.


5

To show this as a two state controller, you could try any of the following. Depending of the audience's knowledge of the matter, 1 and 0 could replace true and false to save space. If they are to be read only, you have the choice of disabling them, or just print them as labels (e.g. similar to a button, but not able to press it) - all depending what you ...


4

I like the grid option you generated, it is pretty clear to see the entire week at one time. For seeing the entire week, one other option you might consider is a piano chart or heatmap type chart. Piano charts are table-style charts that make it easy to see differences in data-density. They visualize the data using a scale of brightness, size, color, ...


4

I think it really depends on the area, but maybe just the typography can help you: some ideas: 1)Strike-through PARTICIPANTS Jim Tim Bob It's quite clear who is participating and who's not. 2) disabled look I guess you can get what options are included :)


3

People don't like change because they fear loss of control over what they're used to know. We are creatures of habit but you always find the bold ones who will love and fight for the new feature, even within the existing user base. These are the ones - let's call them fans - who will help increasing the acceptance of the changed functionality. See the ...


3

To start with it's a good idea not to solely rely upon colors (because of color blindness). Colors can maybe still be kept, if they in the gray scale will result in different gray shades - which can help the user to scan the area. Selecting Activity 1 could highlight all Activity 1 areas in the schedule. Add an abbreviation of what activity each block is. ...


3

One approach is to us a syntax highlighting tool that supports your grammars such as the extensible ace editor. This would guide the correct structure by flagging when BNF / CNF syntax is correct or not understood. Extending this approach you can add special symbols as buttons above editor box (just like the ux.stackexchange UI) auto-prompt for symbols ...


3

Extending part of @dan1111's answer, one other option is adding context to your contact page. One example of this is what Github does under some particular conditions. Take this page for example. If you scroll down to the very bottom and press the "Contact" link in the footer, it takes you to the contact page however with one minor change. Basically, ...


3

You could dynamically show related questions from the FAQ when the user types in the contact form (this assumes you have a contact form instead of telling the users to send an email directly). You probably need to implement some sort of fuzzy search or look for certain keywords for this to work effectively. Stack Exchange does a similar thing in the Ask ...


2

A "down" arrow points to the headline, which directs a user's eyes and attention to follow it toward the text below. If your goal is to get them to read the text, that's a good visual cue. The "up" arrow has the opposite effect, pulling the reader's eye back to the nav bar. Option 2 has me constantly going back to read "Item" instead of the headline or ...


2

Do people (in different countries) use different list-style-type for numbering list element? (e.g. shopping list, to-do list, list of students in school, ...) Yes in some countries using different alphabets to Latin If so, does Greek use greek, Japanese use katakana, Armenians armenian, ... all the time (in every situation) or maybe in a few cases ? ...


2

This is to ensure localization is supported and when a website translation is done, the list styles also reflect localization. For example,here is a screenshot of the number options in different languages which are supported by CSS and required by the W3 for localization For example if you were localizing for Ethiopia, You would be required to use ...


2

This is not a good choice to offer the user. A few problems: The user might change their mind about whether they want to share it, but they will be locked into a choice. The user has to remember what setting they chose. If they forget and accidentally share a non-sharable file, it has destructive consequences. (Yes, you could have your program visually ...


2

So it's a control that represents something extremely intuitive to human beings... Yes/No, True/False. The problem that you state is the the current check boxes look too similar to some check boxes that represent something else. My suggesting is to use the tried and true images... A green checkmark for True and a Red X for false. (Maybe an option for ...


2

I would make the options super simple for the user. I see 3 basic scenarios: Booking an entire day off Booking 1/2 a day off Booking a custom portion off (e.g. I'm leaving at 2pm on Friday) I also see these scenarios occurring by frequency in that order (full day, 1/2 day, custom) As a result I would actually present a UI that gives these 3 options up ...


2

I think the industry has reached a point where UI/UX design needs to be done in a way that is both holistic and also systematic. By this I mean that companies looking to develop new products and services in the digital channel needs to invest time and effort in a design framework or a similar structure that allows you to combine the visual, content and ...



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