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8

I believe the term you are looking for is "Confirmation Dialog" A simple google search on this term shows numerous examples of the paradigm you described. Confirmation Box Google Images "Chicken Box" by contrast shows delicious golden brown fried chicken Chicken Box Google Images


4

A few suggestions I'd have for distraction-free, or user-friendly, text writing UIs: • Tall text field Longform text fields, like the one I'm using to reply to you, provide an inherent white space - so making this field sufficiently tall to feel spacious would be the first step. One helpful additional feature is an expandable text field, as this one on ...


4

It's just a simple Dialog Box. Dialog boxes consist of a title bar (to identify the command, feature, or program where a dialog box came from), an optional main instruction (to explain the user's objective with the dialog box), various controls in the content area (to present options), and commit buttons (to indicate how the user wants to commit to the ...


4

When a user select a seat, she is having a device in front of her imagining the ride she is about to take. For the user the forward direction is in the line of sight and away in the distance. Thinking of going forward makes a vertical seat map more natural. The front of the vehicle need to point upward to make this analogy work. The horizontal ...


4

To expound on what @matt_d_rat wrote, There's a great write-up here about this, but it was originally designed by Norm Cox for the Xerox Star workstation in 1981! This icon is about as old as the concept of GUI itself! To see it in action check out this video and skip to around 21 minutes.


4

I would recommend using positive UI feedback to tell the user where dropping is allowed. For any specific selection, there are usually one or two regions which are valid drop targets. Highlight those and allow other areas to fade into the background. Here's an example from Atlassian Jira: Transitioning an Issue As soon as the user begins dragging the ...


4

This looks like the time selector introduced in Android KitKat; From a UX perspective this UI works well on touch-enabled interfaces but would be a lot less intuitive if used with keyboard/mouse. There is a useful overview of mobile time picker UI's here - http://blog.iangclifton.com/2014/01/22/mobile-time-pickers/ And also a nicer looking ( to me ...


4

I'd suggest you go with the empty item. For two reasons: To be consistent with your criteria options. Why should a user have to leave the date fields empty to get the complete range but have to select an option when it comes to types You usually refine your search by applying filters. Selecting "All" does not refine your search result whereas selecting a ...


3

Don't move my cheese I think this is a classic problem where the developers who've created these tools haven't been able to anticipate how their applications are going to be used. When you can anticipate everything, you're able to design a great UX on the first try. But that just isn't happening here. And then as features are added, they don't bother ...


3

(consider this more user feedback than UX professional feedback) The and and or filters are too complicated. Use and only. The user is smart enough to know that city and mountain and sea view will have few to no results. This simplifies the design (Look at View and Internet, my paint skills are limited): It works out very well with Internet since you can ...


2

First off, wireframes are not high-fidelity screens, so striving pixel perfection should not be the main goal. Having said that, Android screens are dependant on size as well as density. Reading up on Google's screen support page should help clarify. Having developed for Android before, it's more important to create a basic layout, than to achieve total ...


2

Here's another approach: I work in e-commerce and one possible solution to your additional info in a grid problem could be solved with how we display more info about our product on the product listing page. If you think of a product grid as a cell in your spreadsheet. In order to see more info about a product (in this case your cell), a pane could slide ...


2

Being a developer in PHP, Android, C# and working professionally with SharePoint I can only applaud this question. In many developing languages and IDEs it sometimes looks like someone came up with an idea and it was implemented as a button, a menu item or a keyboard shortcut. Without thinking of that this feature will actually be used by someone. Sometimes ...


2

From my comment above. One way of implementing this is to add a little gray 'x' symbol at the end of the input area, that when clicked will clear both the input area and the dropdown results. This system is fairly widespread so users are likely to understand it (for example, Windows Explorer's search box uses this). However, you can always add a caption ...


2

"Last-Chance Dance Dialog" if you want to be cute or clever.


2

The first issue is, which x does what? You have two "x" icons which may do the same thing, but perhaps not. If they do the same thing - why do you have two? If they don't do the same thing - you're using the same icon to do two different things! My concern is that a user may hit the "X" when they intended to hit the arrow, accidentally clearing their ...


1

It's a well established recommendation for publications containing masses of continuous text to use hyphenation. Nope. It's a well established recommendation for publications on paper containing masses of continuous text to use hyphenation. Even on paper you will find a bunch of style guides that recommend against it. Remember that the one of the ...


1

The first problem is that you have only one link "add" for different kind of content. If you can it should be better to contextualize each link : "add a product" on your product list "add a link" on your link list "add an image" wherever you need to insert the picture Then when you ask him to choose a kind of product, he is already answering a question, ...


1

You can simplify it by transforming the tabs into a decision tree. Something like this accordion control : Then you can just pop up the right(single) window, instead of popping up a window with tabs.


1

Try both and see which one users respond to better. A/B testing is a good way to do that. As for my personal thought, I'd think vertical is better. Much like maps have North at the top, I would think of the vehicle front as the top. This is the way I've seen airlines do it, so perhaps it's just my past experience has trained me that way.


1

It sounds to me that, if possible, multi-threading may be a fourth and best-of-both-worlds option. You could monitor the progress of the export and update the UI using a separate thread, which should result in a significant boost in export performance. If this is not an option, is too difficult, or does not help for whatever reason, talking the users into ...


1

A solution would be to talk to your front-end designer/developer, or to give him some kind of documentation about the ids/classes that you used to bind the events to. I would make sure to replace elements selectors (#mydiv > p) with selectors that point directly to ids or classes (#paragraphInsideMyDiv) so that the templates could even be done from scratch ...


1

Just because the medium changes doesn't mean visual balance no longer applies. Because web apps are in a browser and browser sizes vary depending on the user, it is a bit different when comparing it to print media, where the designer knows explicitly the dimensions of the final product. Design is not an exact science, but setting appropriate css rules with ...


1

I admire the effort of mimicking an analog(ue) clock face, but I think you're oversimplifying things into complexity. The first point of hopefully constructive criticism is, in full honesty, one of my pet peeves as a non-native English speaker; the AM/PM thing. If your target audience contains a significant amount of non-natives, you might consider showing ...


1

I cannot give a comprehensive answer, but there is one very important case where the table is superior. Sometimes we have lots of equally structured items (that's an important precondition!) and need to display lots of information about an item in an UI which supports multiple tasks (or multiple scenarios of the same task), but only one piece is relevant ...


1

1) One important aspect is that a tile layout makes it easier to analyse the items one by one (a) while a table makes it easier to compare the items (b): a) The power of getting all the data around one content item in one separated layout item is not to be underestimated. The analogy between the two entities makes it a lot easier to focus on in and make a ...


1

One of the first things to do when attempting to design a UI is to determine what information you need to display to the user, and I know this sounds like a no-brainer, but it's actually a very important step. Once you have a list of this (for you something like "stocks, return, time period, etc.") you can begin to see how the different data sets or ...


1

The Unavailable mouse pointer is always an option that's understood my millions of Windows users:


1

This question is similar to something I recently implemented which has had success. Because I am unaware of the time required to process the request your users are clicking - I will try to give a few broad options. I will try to give answers that do not require building a dashboard or a completely new UI. Cost can drive up quickly doing so. The link ...


1

Some ideas: After clicking the link, disable it so it can't be clicked again. Enable it again when it makes sense for it to be clicked again (if the process completes or fails). Display an indicator near the link to show that the process is in progress. This could be a simple spinner or throbber, a loading bar, a "please wait" message, etc. When the ...



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