Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

There are a few reasons: Robot defense. Content sites (e.g. news sites) sometimes use these buttons to provide a rudimentary defense against content scrapers. By showing only part of the content they prevent scrapers from loading the page and parsing the article. This is obviously very crude, but it is still effective. Affirmation of user intent. ...


7

Quite the opposite, there are several good reasons to do it. Take a look to this article (I don't fully agree with all of it, but you'll get the gist of it) They are important for several reasons, most importantly because they allow designers to compress content on the home page. By compressing content, you fit more content in less space. This means ...


7

This is a pretty simple interface so I only see three options: Leave it as is Move the difficulty to a second screen that appears after the start button is clicked Put the difficulty under the settings menu you have on the footer. Not #2 First of all I want to say I would rule #2 out because there is no need to make the user select their difficulty ...


5

Adding information I found that I originally posted in a comment. I was thinking of Bertin's Visual Variables, which seems to originated from the French book, Jaques Bertin's Sémiologie graphique, referenced in reference was in Designing Visual Interfaces by Mullet & Sano (1994). They are: Position Size Shape Value Colour Orientation Texture


5

I had a similar situation when I was designing an accordion menu. here you can find the related article. For navigation items such as previous and next I would use the icon based on the direction i want to point. (right placed icon for next, left placed icon for previous). For other cases left aligned icons feels more familiar.


5

So the chosen answer, while good, is incorrect as regards this particular screenshot. I am actually responsible for implementing the button in the screen shot. I can't speak for every site but I can say that the thought process (as far as I know) is basically the 3rd option given by tohster. QZ only shows the read full button when you navigate directly to ...


4

If each combobox is always going to have the same set of possible values, you could instead use a DataGridView with multiselectable cells, and change that "Copy to all" button into a "Set Selected Cells" button, so the user has to ctrl+click the cell they want to modify, select the value from the ComboBox and press that Button. This also lets the user select ...


4

A common and effective technique is to make users type the action to complete it. The example below, from Podio, is a bit extreme in my opinion, but the chances of someone accidentally deleting a workspace are pretty low.


3

Updated answer A reduced calendar may be easier to understand and use as oppose to the multiple dropdown or the range slider option. e.g. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Calendar views are helpful in orientating the user in selecting the correct date much better than a dropdown. Switching over to a weekly (or ...


3

You could have them in an accordion stacked top of each other. at default the 1st form with the contents of your 1st screen would be in expanded state. after that is completely filled it would collapse and the 2nd form would expand. only after the compulsory fields have been completed that the book button will be enabled.


3

There are a couple of websites that inform you about UI components and patterns. I am listing the most useful ones: 1. Welie A comprehensive list of UI components, principles and patterns segmented into user needs, application needs and context of design. Their library consists of Navigation, Search, Data, Shopping, Input, Feedback and Miscellaneous ...


3

Both the options are good but Tree navigation is recommended. My suggestion would be add the search box above the tree navigation to access the menu item quickly. User can type 3 letter in the search box to get the respective page link.


2

If you want to keep it conversational you could try to make one sentence out of it with a Natural Language form: http://tympanus.net/Tutorials/NaturalLanguageForm/ Something like: This reminder will repeat on the | 1st | | day | of | every | | month |. You could combine this with javascript to enable conditional extra options to make it work.


2

Showing inaccurate information to promote design is a MAJOR UX SIN you cant lie to your users to make them "like the design" If you dislike the way the graph looks you have 3 options use a different graph system I think bars are a good representation for this,but thats no doubt your personal choice. add more in between steps Not sure what the information ...


2

1.1 You seem to have space for a [ haggle (3 left) ] there. I believe that does it. 1.2 A "send haggle" button would be more clear. Don't use the counter inside the send button, though, inform that elsewhere. "You have 2 haggles left" 2.1 replace the "Send" button with a "get more haggles" paired with the above message changed to "You have 0 haggles left". ...


2

I think what you're asking for is a canonical set of definitions/guidelines for standard UI components. To me, a useful set would be: Concise, so readers can refer to it quickly. Precise but not too technical, so that it can be useful for both professionals and lay audiences alike. Comprehensive enough to cover all major controls but not so pedantically ...


2

My preference would be to place the icon on the left. But if you need to have it on the right, it would also kind of work I think (but not as well as on the left). When collapsed, it should point to the right ">" When expanded it should point downwards "V" As regards expanded / collapsed state - from my (limited) testing with business users it is more ...


2

Wow! That's an impressive settings table! Even a little scary. From the looks of it, I'm assuming this is a proprietary app you can't tell us too much about. But I'll pose a few questions just the same. Is the position of a cell meaningful to the user? If it's important that they understand how a unit relates to two relational axes, the grid presentation ...


2

Whether a pattern is "better" or not is completely related to the users need and project constraints. It's hard to determine in your mockup if what your attempting to create is a faceted navigation, or an advanced search. I suspect it's the former. In order determine if a solution is "better" we would first need to know more specifics about the user and ...


2

First of all: Do not hide features This will frustrate people and make them angry Design Approach The feature is normally accessible where you want to find it (For example Main database settings when deleting a database or Account-Settings if deleting an account) You can use a red Button and other visual clues to make clear that the decision the user needs ...


2

It's not very good UX, because Apple's goal is to make devices that behave exactly how you'd expect, and as you've stated in your question most people don't expect it to work that way. Matter of fact, there is a common prank where you set autocorrect shortcuts that replace common phrases with embarrassing or weird ones. And as you type, your phone ...


1

As far as length goes, they should be as short as possible and they should be understandable by whatever your user base is. So the length also depends on your user base because you may need to add more or less of an explanation depending on your users. Also, as DA01 said, you should make sure that your UI actually needs them, rather than needlessly ...


1

As I see it, adding a '>' creates a feeling that you will be redirected somewhere else (another view!), you dont really expect a dropdown. I always apply the common sense in this case scenario: When collapsed: "V" When expanded: "A" these are self explanatory


1

Yes the position of icons is critical in buttons especially if you are working multi lingual applications. Having worked on web applications with Arabic as the primary language, I can tell you it is important that the right-to-left culture or vice versa is reflected in all aspects of UI, including placement of icons.


1

It depends on the reason you are using an icon in addition to the Text. In the examples that you have mentioned, I see two different reasons why the icon has been included Icon is being used to visually represent the task. Like you have done for the Shortlist button. Over time users would recognise the icon and not need the supporting text for their ...


1

To me, it depends if it's to perform an action or for the flow. For the flow, you'd want to "point" people in a timeline direction (as with the next button, where the arrow is after the text), where it a "back button" than the arrow would be in front of it, as per convention. The position of "actionable" icons, to me, doesn't seem to affect a whole lot, as ...


1

you need a different approach here. The user is probably only interested in exceptions (red, orange, blue?) so you should render the display differently. I would advocate having a simple traffic light screen with each colour having a number beside it green (14), orange (3), red (2), blue (1). On click user goes to listing of all the issues of that ...


1

One thing I like to always do, is looking at if from the other way around and simply go mobile-first, so it definitly makes sense to try and do this exercise. The limitation of mobile phones lets you focus on the really important parts. When going to a tablet or desktop you'll notice that adding stuff is much easier than removing stuff. For the tables, I'd ...


1

I do like the article by the NG group and how you implemented your tool tips. In general I am not the biggest fan of tool tips because they are pretty useless on touch screens. I do agree with how you display the tool tip on the element rather than on the column or row name. Here's something you can do to allow users to discover them but not have them ...


1

Guide the workflow better Observations There is too much information on the screen. The SEARCH and DETAILS panels persist and clutter the user's flow at the top. This makes scrolling awkward, and it's easy for the user to feel overwhelmed with choices because of the number of widgets on screen. Fundamentally you are using a very linear workflow. The ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible