Hot answers tagged

102

If a user can't find an option or feature, then it doesn't exist There has to be some means by which a user who is looking for a feature can reasonably expect to find it, and by which users can browse features to learn what is available. Well-designed menus are really good at this. Clusters of related buttons and displays too, especially with tool tips. ...


65

Why not let the user decide? I'd simply have a toggle that enables/disables the auto repeat feature. I see two use cases: Someone is wanting a quick review of things that they have just learned (autorepeat is not really needed) Someone is learning new vocabulary and needs to absorb the nuances of each sign (autorepeat is very useful) I believe it would ...


47

A 1 or 2 seconds video is really short; and looping it will make it look like it is stuttering. I suggest create a longer video showing the sign 2, 3 times; with different camera angles (if possible). have a repeat/replay button easily accessible.


30

You'd probably needs someone who works at Microsoft to answer this one, but from the outside observer, there are a number of reasons why this might be the case: They cater for a very diverse group of users: think about the audience and users of Microsoft products and perhaps this is a way to accommodate all the different ways that people might use the ...


12

Often this can be summed up with 2 words. Backwards Compatibility The original Word users likely migrated from WordPerfect.. Which was very keyboard focused cause when you type that's where your hands are. Thus when Word first had its menus and toolbars they had to support hot keys too. When they came out with "personalized menus" where options not used ...


11

Keyboard shortcuts The fastest. Tool bars It's the fastest if it is impractical to set a keyboard shortcut for everything. And if it wasn't an editor, people sometimes just don't want to use a keyboard for whatever reasons. Context menus They are more likely showing what the users intended to do. Changing the tool bars too much on the fly may distract ...


11

From personal experience, I can comfortably watch a 2 second gif repeatedly, if and only if the transition from end to start is quite smooth. If you are working with computer generated models: Perhaps the hands could return to the default position after they finish. If you are working with content you can't influence: Perhaps you can add a fade out of the ...


9

That's kind of oldschool. We like to say "Never touch a running system" but violations against this doctrine are the fuel of progress. Personally, I have also used a 2 column website where the footer was only displayed at the left (ca. 40% width) site and no one had a problem with it. The reason why this is done seem to be the familiarity. But I also have ...


8

It's simply very painful to remove features from established software. Featuritus is often a marketing advantage. The initial redundancy of being able to invoke an action via menu or keyboard is proven useful pattern - some people prefer to use the mouse (menu) and some prefer the keyboard. The menus are more discoverable but the keyboard is faster. This ...


7

It doesn't. They probably should have stated that it's the most usual design pattern. Design patterns help people navigate unknown content, so when most sites use footers that span the page to anchor the content, users get used to the idea of when they see the horizontal divider with a bunch of links, they have probably hit the end of the page. Familiarity ...


7

Do not have the video on repeat by default; if a repeat option is offered to the user or if the sign is repeated within the video itself, make sure it's completely obvious when the sign starts and when it ends. Some signs repeat parts of the sign. Do not confuse users into thinking a sign must be repeated by repeating it.


6

First, I'm assuming that they meant that the styling of the block around all the footer content (in particular, its background colour, borders, etc) should span the width of the screen - not that the text containers within the footer should be 1-column full-width and therefore insanely wide on wide devices. That'd be bad design because the measure of the ...


4

Microsoft's Jensen Harris wrote an extensive series of blog posts about the MS Office 2007 UI design as it evolved, which went into a great deal of detail about (what was then) the radical new ribbon design, why they kept what they kept, and why they changed what they changed. Obviously a little dated now, but well worth a read.


4

Checkbox Grid/Matrix I believe you were on the right track by using a checkbox grid. It's just your design of it that needs improving. I would go with the objects as headers for a table and the attributes as the rows. Benefits The objects and corresponding available attributes are clearly visible The selected attributes are obvious - emphasised by ...


3

You're correct about the matrix of checkboxes becoming ugly :) It's also not scalable to smaller screens (if that's a concern). Several solutions come to mind: MultiSelect This seems like a great use case for a multiselect. The advantage being its scalable to nearly any number of potential options, only selected options are shown, and its searchable so ...


3

Avoid having a jump cut from the end of the video to the start without anything to indicate that's what's happening. Starting with a freeze-frame and a caption, then letting the animation play, and then having a freeze-frame which dissolves quickly (e.g. 0.1 second) back to the first freeze-frame+caption combo will make it very clear where the loop is, and ...


3

I'll agree with you, showing errors one by one could be really annoying and might have a negative impact on your business or users. A form is like a conversation with your users. Why not be a great communicator and use inline form validation that's delivered at the right place and at the right time? For example, take a look at Twitter's sign up form: In ...


2

Having a tooltip on the field input/label hover is too hidden away and only discovered by accident. How does the user know which elements have and which elements do not have a tooltip? If you do show an indication somehow that an input does have a tooltip (e.g. ? inside the input somewhere) how do you handle the opening of it for touch screen? ...


2

I took a similar approach in solving this with a 24 hour circle. I found this much easier to use. Once implemented, most users loved it - others felt like its was hard to set smaller 15 min increments. However, fine tuning into these increments depends on where on the circle the user would tap (on the outer edges are best as more surface/touch area) and ...


2

You might be mixing up use cases. Bootstrap might be responsive, but it's mainly focused on quickly bootstrapping websites. Whereas Material Design was created with a very heavy focus on mobile interactions. I would argue that, while on bootstrap you do have a dropdown + call-to-action button, on Material Design the second part is not a call-to-action. It ...


2

Sending post within the UK and abroad requires lots of decisions and different bits of information depending on previous selections. It's probably a similarly complex process in many other countries too, but the UK Royal Mail Price Finder actually does a pretty good job of this, as it's otherwise a bit of a nightmare. The overall impression is reasonably ...


2

If you look at it more closely, most of the redundancy consists of different "access vectors" to the same functionality. You may be able to achieve the same thing through the menu, through a context menu, a toolbar button or a hotkey – but you are unlikely to find multiple menu items or multiple hotkeys for the same thing. These access vectors cater to ...


2

scottishwildcat's answer already touched on Jensen Harris's excellent blog posts about the "new Office UI" (the Ribbon debuting in Office 2007), but there is one article which I think is particularly pertinent, titled "No Distaste for Paste": Early on, we were toying with the idea of not having buttons for Cut/Copy/Paste in the Ribbon. Everyone “knew” ...


2

Provide links / show buttons in context Assuming the apps you want to showcase are actually relevant to the user in this scenario (and you're not just trying to shoehorn in services for the sake of it), then just show the app buttons/links in locations relevant to their utility. So nutritional information would appear with the other metadata at the top of ...


2

Make the checkboxes bigger - this is not a problem for users with age 30+ because their vision is not on 100% as before. Use button. You should design it to contrast your current color scheme so it is easilty visible. Use some accent colors (A100,A200, A400,A700) from the material design pallete to do that. You should play with the accent colors to find the ...


2

Can you replace the checkbox with a toggle, some kind of select-button? I would place a large green submit-button at the bottom right of the page. Perhaps in its own row so it will always be visible to the user. The user shall be able to scroll trough the items and when the users is done selecting, the button is there at the "end of the list" were the users ...


2

This is a pretty common interaction on a lot of shopping websites and the norm is pretty much always: If user clicks/taps on open icon (default), turn open icon to filled icon and add to favorites. If user clicks/taps on filled icon, turn filled icon to default and remove from favorites. Moving the products to a separate section during the interaction ...


2

Don't move it automatically. If I'm halfway down the list and think "Oh, I like this one!" and click the star, I would be very frustrated if it disappeared from sight. I would instead just provide feedback that it was added to the user's favorites list by filling in your "favorites" icon. Additionally, provide a way to filter by favorites. If the thing I ...


2

Have you considered overlaying your Down and Unknown state? Here's a low fidelity mockup of what I mean: For point a, it makes sense to know when something is unknown (no data) or down (negative result). For point b, I could see a line graph for the latency then overlay a bar or change the background for times where latency is undefined or the host is ...


2

For processes where the output is indeterminate, use a progress bar which is Continuous/ Indeterminate. Here's a good example to follow for different types of Progress: I believe the 4th transition above showcasing types of Progress bars answers your question regarding how to transition between Indeterminate to Determinate and vice versa. One can even ...



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