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5

In short: Both are non-user friendly. . Math for computers... The RGB color model specifies the intensity of red, green, and blue on a scale of 0 to 255, with 0 (zero) indicating the minimum intensity. The settings of the three colors are converted to a single integer value by using this formula: RGB value= Red + (Green*256) + (Blue*256*256) Most ...


4

How about something where admins can click/drag the hours for each day. You could provide extra feedback of the actual hours selected during this action.


4

If you like graphical solutions you may try something like this: Clicking in the stripe below the edit field helps to select the hours without typing them. User may also click and drag, if they like.


3

Which one is better and why? And how does frequency setting design in website view and mobile view? Among the choices you have given (slider and drop-down), drop-down is far better than the slider design (regardless of website or mobile) due to these problems with your slider 1) Just by looking at your slider I cannot make out which different ...


3

What qualifies as a good UI implementation for desktop and mobile differs slightly. It also depends on the context in question. User probably wouldn't be able to tell the difference between 15 minutes or 17 minutes, 30 seconds or 1 minute notification. I would do away with free text input box and replace with a drop down to limit the choice. The selection ...


3

The feedback from your users are valuable. Did you ask what did they not understand about the date, start/end time? I would choose usability and sacrifice a bit on the aesthetic if necessary. There are a few factors you should consider to improve the usability. Labels and Hints Run some A/B test on your form labels. Instead of What service are you after ...


2

Focus on what the user wants: Products! Users don't come to an ecomm app to enjoy the UI. They want to shop. Start there and get everything else out of the way. Ask yourself, "How can the UI make shopping as simple as possible?" The ecomm story In my experience, the user has four primary steps. Find a product Confirm product details Add the product to ...


2

Same person? Ideally, but nearly impossible to pull off as nearly any software project of even moderate size requires a rather diverse team. Same entity? Absolutely. The ability to create a great UX is as much about the back end as it is about the front end. This is true both for pure UI work (consumer facing UI vs. admin facing UI) as well as the product ...


2

In my experience, a checkbox in the left hand column will select the whole row. Not selecting, as in this case, both the name and the subjects, but the whole row (the student, conceptually). So, I think it would be expected to select the row (a student) and perform the actions you have available, even if they are only performed on one of the columns. But, ...


2

But my question ultimately boils down to, what's the best approach to select a suitable colour that provides enough contrast, when that element bridges the gap between a dark and a light area? I believe the answer to your question can be found here and here. Whatever color you choose, you have to keep in mind web accessibility.The Web Content ...


2

This is an old question, but I'd like to share this anyway. History Random Wire has an insightful perspective on influencing factors behind Japan's internet. A few highlights ... Go on a safari around some of Japan’s most popular sites and here’s what you can expect to find (see Goo, Rakuten, Yomiuri, NicoNico, OKWave, @cosme, and more): ...


1

You have a customer detail page, you send them to another page to make changes. When they are done, they come back to the details page to save their changes. What if they spot a mistake? Are they going to go back to the edit page and make changes again? Too much back and forth don't you think? Worse still what if they forget to save? Actually nothing wrong ...


1

Here is my solution to collect working times:


1

Before choosing between them, you should think of the best possible version of each one. Eg: Text Box You could let the user type freely but also offer some default options to make them easier for them (Google Calendar does this) In the case the possible values are not too much you could offer an spinner Slider I suggest to read this N.Nielsen ...


1

I think you're on the right track but what's missing and what would make this really useful is for the design to empahise key metrics I've attached a comp This is a pattern I've seen elsewhere and addresses the use case "I have a loan amount in mind and I want to see over how many months I would need to pay it back at a rate I can afford" and brings the ...


1

A modal is going to be a much better user experience if done correctly rather than taking the user away from their current page (you're breaking the flow). Instead of making deleting an item difficult, make deleting an item easy. Then make undoing the action just as easy. A confirmation is only necessary when the following things are true: deleting the ...


1

I'm not too much into the blogging world to say if it's common for the content to be "coupled" enough to require subcribers to "be up to date" and I'm not sure if they are necessary expecting to find the "missing piece of information" in the same blog neither. If you know they do, some options may be: If new posts are related with some older ones, the ...


1

There are plenty of examples out there to pick inspiration from. Here is a use case from stackexchange app itself: The social feed has exploded and there are plenty of streams other than just the latest feed. You will find Newest post, trending, top posts, active posts and so on... Depending on the application/delivery channel you need to identify which of ...


1

I made a comment about precentages. you could attempt to do something similar to this: do NOT make this design. it has many flaws and should not be replicated on a real app, its just to show how big UI elements that take up a fixed range on the screen can look good


1

I'd suggest some similar to Amazon approach: a search bar, which let users constraint the search and then categories. In the categories menu if you can't show them all, you can just an option like "See all categories", which could redirect to a new pages with more options to navegate those categories.


1

There are some suggestions to the current design: Place related controls close to the context: Add/Remove/Clear are close to the table, and the Classes and Subjects are on the perephery Remove icons, they looks not so distinctive and if the icon fonts will not load, user will see 'Student' and 'Students' actions, instead of the intended 'Add Student' and ...


1

Do enable drag and drop if possible, but don't rely on it fully. Let people select multiple in the list and then move over like in one of the examples. Not just by checkbox clicking but the full line item clicking. Add / remove might be represented with left / right arrows. Just those text labels are not straightforward. Mark the weight consistently. '3.15 ...


1

IMHO your pattern to switch between columns is not bad UX at all, so I think it could work just right. That said, some observations: Other option would be to remove the buttons and use drag&drop. Then you won't need the buttons (cleaner interface) and it will be useful specially if you want to offer users a way of moving the items to an specific ...


1

I think there may be a couple of other reasons for the change in font size in addition to those listed. I don't think it's necessarily age related. Previously web designers were in complete control. In my experience, we do more user testing now, which means that designers get to hear feedback such as "I can barely read that article" or "My sight's not ...



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