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118

Screen digits are right aligned to maintain positional consistency between what a number represents (in base 10 that would be units, tens, hundreds, etc.). E.g. If I were to have 764 and then multiply it by 24, the answer would be 18336. By aligning to the right I've consistently seen the same unit representation in the same position, and when I've had new ...


31

Digits are right aligned for similar reasons as you would right align them in a spreadsheet or a table. i.e. when you see multiple numbers (and they all have a fixed set of decimal places), then it's easier to compare the numbers with each other because the digits corresponding to each place value are in the same physical position, thus making it easier to ...


10

I don't have any data about this question, neverthless here my thought: Readability is much better for right aligned numbers. Why? Consistency. The Decimal points always stays at the same location, decimal separators too. So it is much easier for a user to identify how big a number is. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


8

When using right aligned numbers you must note that decimal separators are aligned only if there are equal amount digits after decimal separator: 12 345,90 132 987,9376 Aligning such numbers left would probably be even worse, so in cases where number of digits after decimal separator are not equal numbers should probably be aligned by decimal ...


6

You're trying to create a nested master-detail-detail relationship, which is often difficult to accomplish in general. But your main problem here is visual, the relationships aren't visualized well because all three levels share the same BG color, which makes it seem like they're all "top-level". If you give the "details" panes the same BG color as the ...


4

Between those options I would suggest radio buttons, since you only want to allow for a single selection. O - At or Over Retirement Age O - Under Retirement Age O - Both If you use check boxes, people may wind up checking the top 2 instead of/in addition to "both".


4

There isn't really a "good" answer to your question, simply because they're engaged in bad practice. While that sounds negative, the simple answer is that they are not considering the User Experience properly: a flaw many designers and developers have, and one which I'm guilty of displaying myself on occasion. It may be that it takes too long, that they ...


4

This a common case in a complex workflow or process, which can be solved with progressive disclosure, like:- Initially show all parent tasks with their progress indicated and also childs status with notation like 2 off 5 childs is comleleted (indicated by showing 2/5). For more detail user can always expand a parent task to get sub-task details which in ...


4

I'd like your opinion on the process I am trying to simplify, any and all suggestions welcome. I don't know — because I don't know what the customers are like, what the booking process is like, and what the pricing and business model is. Things I would be thinking about: Is it actually faster and more convenient? You are, for example, removing ...


4

In general, columns of numbers which are being examined as numbers should be decimal-point aligned (or right-aligned if the only decimal point is "implied"). Quantities which involve more than one radix point (e.g. currency amount in Britain prior to decimalization) should align each radix point, and right-align the columns between them; e.g. an itemized ...


3

This is just another example of the famous state-action ambiguity problem, which is discussed in length on this UX.SE question. The designer of the interface in question has chosen to show the state, rather than the action. Like you, I find it a bit awkward and unintuitive, but theory wise - there's nothing wrong with it, it can be either or, and neither ...


3

Fixed names for variable circumstances is, in itself, fairly bad UX: if you can change that, I suggest you do. If it's not possible to change, however, I'd just name them after whatever goes through it: "Car" and "Pedestrian" - the user presumably knows what the app is for (opening gates) already, so just needs an identifier


3

I understand the question you are asking but think that it may be hard to give a generic one-size-fits-all answer. The UX workflow from company to company is so vast that what you ultimately decide to go with will require a lot of user research. On top of that, the workflow from product to product and even person to person is never the same (a real eye ...


2

Provide thumbnail for quick view, clicking on the thumbnail opens full image in a new browser tab. Provide a download overlay icon on top of each thumbnail for pick and download. Also provide 'Download All' action at some corner to download/save all output file. Providing thumbnail for pdf/text is possible. Please refer to below Gmail attachment ...


2

Full disclosure, I prefer keyboard shortcuts to menus even though they aren't visible. I think all menus already obscure their content, so it's not just a case of knowing where 'file, edit, etc' are you already need to know what is inside them. If you know what is inside them then chances are you know where they are positioned on the screen. As such I ...


2

You could user a "user" icon for a manually generated document, and a "computer" icon for the automatically generated ones.


2

Why do web designers force users to enter credit card numbers without hyphens or spaces? Laziness. In general, super-strict form field format requirements rarely benefits the end user. It's typically implemented that way due to lax parsing on the back end/status quo/low priority. Which is unfortunate.


2

From a user perspective, if I'm after a red shirt, I'd prefer seeing an option saying 'red shirt', rather than an option saying 'red' and another saying 'shirt'. With checkboxes: Users have to actually read the two options and ensure the two combine into the whole (all age groups - which is really what they have articulated in mind). This is an exercise ...


1

Remove all borders and rounded corners and keep each cell a single solid color. The best UI is no UI at all so make sure that everything you add absolutely has a reason for being there. Even simple things like borders and gradients can cause friction to the end user. I'm not sure the keyboard is even required to be there. Perhaps consider having a way ...


1

In our system, numbers in our common calculators are shown in powers of ten. Let’s take a number ‘8634’. 8634 = 8x1000+ 6 x100 + 3 x10 + 4 x1 So starting from right to left, we have 0 power 10 then 1 power 10 then 2 powers 10 and so on. To keep it simple, this tradition makes readability easy from right to left.


1

I think I grasped your question correctly: you want to redesign a web site, and the accompanying native app should look similar to it. You need a native app for certain features like push notifications. By going down the native route it would require you to override the GUI controls in whatever platform and redraw these controls to look how you designed ...


1

Simplicity. Both in terms of implementation and in telling the user what is expected. All users will understand what it means to enter the number with all digits and no dashes or spaces. Some small amount of customers will get confused if told that they can use dashes or spaces, and then they see their card only has spaces, no dashes. Keep in mind there ...


1

For accessibility sake (WCAG standards): As opposed to what Google or SE does, you really should include underline in order to provide a visual way to distinguish links from non-links. Don't use colours to convey meaning. (1/4 people are colourblind) Some things you could consider are perhaps using clever typography and make each entry more human ...


1

I understand why you’re asking this question but unless it is underlined or has different color users will not distinguish links from non-links. I would use navy, muted green, or brown with medium gray for non-link texts. Avoid using highly saturated colors. Use slightly different color for mouse-over. No underline for link heavy website.


1

I think this is perhaps a bit of the 'lipstick on a pig' situation. I agree with you in that the ideal UX incorporates a UI that is compatible with the business logic and technology that's running it. I'm often asked to design 'the ideal' independent of the particular technology. This can be a fun exercise, but rarely produces a result that is optimized ...


1

Remember when Microsoft introduced the ribbon UI in MS Word and dropped the FILE MENU and replaced it with the GLOWING ORB OF MYSTERY? Remember how long it took you to find the PRINT option that first afternoon of the upgrade? :) Point being that, no, it's not a requirement--as MS has clearly shown--but it is a convention. So deciding to veer away from ...


1

I would like to leave a comment but it seems that only experienced users can do it. So I have decided to write an answer instead, let's see if you can use any of my ideas for your project :-) To provide a good solution one should get more information about how this particular software is used by the users: do they use some of the boxes ("rectangles") more ...


1

Your instincts in general are on point, but your implementation is a little bit wonky. The interface you have 1) moves from right to left (first select something from the right, then enter info on the left) and 2) requires a loading/unloading step that isn't strictly necessary. Here how I would redo your interface: download bmml source – ...



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